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Talk About the Weather in Hebrew Like a Native

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Did you know that every minute of the day, one billion tons of rain falls on the earth? Hard to believe, considering the climate crisis! Of course, all that rain is not equally shared across the planet.

So, would you mention this fascinating fact to your new Israeli acquaintance? Well, small talk about local weather is actually a great conversation-starter. Everyone cares about the weather and you’re sure to hear a few interesting opinions! Seasons can be quite unpredictable these days and nobody knows the peculiarities of a region better than the locals.

HebrewPod101 will equip you with all the weather vocabulary you need to plan your next adventure. The weather can even be an important discussion that influences your adventure plans. After all, you wouldn’t want to get caught on an inflatable boat with a two-horsepower motor in Hurricane Horrendous!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Time Phrases in Hebrew

Table of Contents

  1. Talking about the weather in Israel
  2. Words for the first day of spring
  3. Do You Know the Essential Summer Vocabulary?
  4. Must-Know Autumn vocabulary
  5. Winter
  6. HebrewPod101 can prepare you for any season.


1. Talking about the weather in Israel

Talking About Weather

If you’re like me, your day’s activity plan is likely to begin with a strong local coffee and a chat about what the sky is doing. After all, being prepared could be the difference between an amazing day and a miserable one! Luckily, it’s not difficult to comment on Israeli weather - just start with these simple words and phrases.

1- Rain - גשם (geshem)

Watercolor artists, take out your paints! You might not be able to venture out on foot today, but just embrace the rain as part of your Israeli experience. When the rain stops, the air will be clean and colours vibrant.

2- The snow has covered everything - השלג כיסה את הכל (Ha’sheleg kisa et ha-kol).

A fresh blanket of snow is irresistibly beautiful. Pull on your boots and beanie, and leave your tracks in this foreign landscape. Don’t resist the urge to build a snowman – you need this!

3- Fluffy cloud - ענן צמרירי (anan tsam’riri)

When you’re waiting for a warm beach day, fluffy white clouds in a blue sky are a good sign. Don’t forget your sunscreen, as clouds will intensify the UV rays hitting your skin.

Fluffy White Cloud in Clear Blue Sky

4- The water froze on the glass - המים קפאו על הזכוכית (Ha-mayim kaf-u al ha-z’khukhit).

Night temperatures can get chilly and might freeze the condensation on your windows. A good way to clear them up is with warm salt water.

5- The heavy rain could cause flash flooding - הגשם הכבד הזה יכול לגרום לשטפונות (Ha-geshem ha-kaved ha-ze yakhol lig’rom le-shit’fonot).

If you’re visiting Israel in the wet season, it’s important to stay informed when heavy rain sets in, so keep an eye on the weather radar. Avoid river activities and rather spend this time making a home-cooked meal and brushing up on your Hebrew weather words.

Heavy Rain in a Park

6- Flood - הצפה (hatzafah)

If you do get caught in a flood, your destination should no longer be ‘home’, but the nearest high ground.

7- The typhoon has hit - הטייפון היכה (Ha’tayfun hika.)

Not all countries experience typhoons, but you need to know when to prepare for one! It will be very scary if you’ve never experienced one before. Your local neighbours are the best people to advise you on where to take shelter, as they’ve been doing it for generations. Be sure to get the low-down at the first sign of rough weather!

8- Check the weather report before going sailing - בדוק את תחזית מזג האוויר לפני הליכה לשיט (B’dok et takhazit mezeg ha-avir lif’nei halikha le-sha’it).

When planning an outdoor activity, especially on a body of water, always be prepared for a change in the weather. Ask your hotel receptionist or neighbour where you can get a reliable daily weather report, and don’t forget your sweater!

Two Men on Sailboat

9- Today’s weather is sunny with occasional clouds - המזג אוויר היום הוא שמשי עם עננים מזדמנים
(Ha-mezeg avir hayom hu shim’shi im ananim miz’dam’nim).

Sunny weather is the dream when traveling in Israel! Wake up early, pack the hats and sunblock and go and experience the terrain, sights and beautiful spots. You’ll be rewarded with happy vibes all around.

10- A rainy day - יום גשום (yom gashum)

Remember when you said you’d save the Hebrew podcasts for a rainy day? Now’s that day!

11- Scenic rainbow - נוף קשת בענן (nof keshet be-anan)

The best part about the rain is that you can look forward to your first rainbow in Israel. There’s magic in that!

12- Flashes of lightning can be beautiful, but are very dangerous - הבזקי ברק יכולים להיות יפיפיים, אך הם מסוכנים ביותר (Hevzekey barak yekholim lihiyot yefeifi’im, akh hem mesukanim beyoter).

Lightning is one of the most fascinating weather phenomena you can witness without really being in danger – at least if you’re sensible and stay indoors! Did you know that lightning strikes the earth 40-50 times per second? Fortunately, not all countries experience heavy electric storms!

Electric Storm

13- 25 degrees Celsius - עשרים וחמש מעלות צלזיוס (esrim ve’kha’mesh ma’a'lot tselzius)

Asking a local what the outside temperature will be is another useful question for planning your day. It’s easy if you know the Hebrew term for ‘degrees Celsius’.

14- Fahrenheit - פרנהייט (farenhait)

Although the Fahrenheit system has been replaced by Celsius in almost all countries, it’s still used in the US and a few other places. Learn this phrase in Hebrew in case one of your companions develops a raging fever.

15- Today the sky is clear - בהיר (bahir)

Clear skies mean you’ll probably want to get the camera out and capture some nature shots - not to mention the great sunsets you’ll have later on. Twilight can lend an especially magical quality to a landscape on a clear sky day, when the light is not filtered through clouds.

Hikers on Mountain with Clear Sky

16- Light drizzle - טפטוף קל (tiftuf kal)

Days when it’s drizzling are perfect for taking in the cultural offerings of Israel. You could go to the mall and watch a Israeli film, visit museums and art galleries, explore indoor markets or even find the nearest climbing wall. Bring an umbrella!

17- Temperature - טמפרטורה (temperatura)

Because of the coronavirus, many airports are conducting temperature screening on passengers. Don’t worry though - it’s just a precaution. Your temperature might be taken with a no-touch thermometer, which measures infrared energy coming off the body.

18- Humid - לח (lach)

I love humid days, but then I’m also a water baby and I think the two go
together like summer and rain. Find a pool or a stream to cool off in – preferably in the shade!

Humidity in Tropical Forest

19- With low humidity the air feels dry - כאשר הלחות נמוכה, יש תחושה של יובש באוויר (Ka’asher ha’lakhut nemukha, yesh tkhusha shel yovesh ba-avir).

These are the best days to go walking the hills and vales. Just take at least one Israeli friend with you so you don’t get lost!

20- The wind is really strong - הרוח מאוד חזקה (haru’akh me’od khazaka).

A strong wind blows away the air pollution and is very healthy in that respect. Just avoid the mountain trails today, unless you fancy being blown across the continent like a hot air balloon.

21- It’s very windy outside - סוער בחוץ (So’er ba-khutz).

Wind! My least favourite weather condition. Of course, if you’re a kitesurfer, a windy day is what you’ve been waiting for!

Leaves and Umbrella in the Wind

22- Wet roads can ice over when the temperature falls below freezing - phrase

The roads will be dangerous in these conditions, so please don’t take chances. The ice will thaw as soon as the sun comes out, so be patient!

23- Today is very muggy - היום מאוד לח וחם (Ha-yom me’od lakh ve-kham).

Muggy days make your skin feel sticky and sap your energy. They’re particular to high humidity. Cold shower, anyone? Ice vest? Whatever it takes to feel relief from the humidity!

24- Fog - ערפל (arafel)

Not a great time to be driving, especially in unknown territory, but keep your fog lights on and drive slowly.

Fog on a Pond with Ducks

25- Hurricane - הוריקן (hurikan)

Your new Israeli friends will know the signs, so grab some food and candles and prepare for a night of staying warm and chatting about wild weather in Israel.

Palm Trees in a Hurricane

26- Big tornado - טורנדו גדול (tor’nado gadol)

If you hear these words, it will probably be obvious already that everyone is preparing for the worst! Definitely do whatever your accommodation hosts tell you to do when a tornado is expected.

27- It’s cloudy today - מעונן היום (Me’unan ha-yom).

While there won’t be any stargazing tonight, the magnificent clouds over Israel will make impressive photographs. Caption them in Hebrew to impress your friends back home!

Cloudy Weather on Beach with Beach Huts

28- Below freezing temperatures - טמפרטורות מתחת לנקודת הקיפאון (tem’peraturor mi-takhat li’nkudat ha-kipa’on)

When the temperature is below freezing, why not take an Uber and go shopping for some gorgeous Israeli winter gear?

Woman with Winter Gear in Freezing Weather

29- Wind chill is how cold it really feels outside - צינת הרוח היא הרגשת הקור האמיתית בחוץ (Tsi’nat ha’ruach hi har’gashat h’kor ha-ami’tit ba’khuts).

Wind doesn’t change the ambient temperature of the air, it just changes your body temperature, so the air will feel colder to you than it actually is. Not all your Israeli friends will know that, though, so learn this Hebrew phrase to sound really smart!

30- Water will freeze when the temperature falls below zero degrees celsius - מים קופאים כאשר הטמפרטורה יורדת מתחת לאפס מעלות צלזיוס.מים קופאים כאשר הטמפרטורה יורדת מתחת לאפס מעלות צלזיוס (Mayim kof’im ka’asher hatem’peratura yoredet mitakhat le’efes ma’a lot tsel’zius).

If you’re near a lake, frozen water is good news! Forgot your ice skates? Don’t despair - find out where you can hire some. Be cautious, though: the ice needs to be at least four inches thick for safe skating. Personally, I just slide around on frozen lakes in my boots!

Thermometer Below Freezing Point

31- Waiting to clear up - מחכה שיתבהר (mekhake she`yitbaher)

Waiting for the weather to clear up so you can go exploring is frustrating, let’s be honest. That’s why you should always travel with two things: a scintillating novel and your Hebrew Nook Book.

32- Avoid the extreme heat - מתחמק מחום כבדמתחמק מחום כבד (mit’khamek me’khom kaved)

Is the heat trying to kill you? Unless you’re a hardened heatwave hero, definitely avoid activity, stay hydrated and drink electrolytes. Loose cotton or linen garb is the way to go!

Hand Holding a Melting Ice Cream

33- Morning frost - צינת בוקר (tsi’nat bo’ker)

Frost is water vapour that has turned to ice crystals and it happens when the earth cools so much in the night, that it gets colder than the air above it. Winter is coming!

34- Rain shower - ממטר גשם (mimtar geshem)

Rain showers are typically brief downpours that drench the earth with a good drink of water.

35- In the evening it will become cloudy and cold - בערב, יהפך להיות מעונן וקר (Ba-erev, ye’hafech lihiyot me’unan ve’kar).

When I hear this on the Hebrew weather channel, I buy a bottle of wine (red, of course) and wood for the fireplace. A cold and cloudy evening needs its comforts!

Snow in the Park at Night

36- Severe thunderstorm - סופת ברקים חמורה (sufat b’rakim kha’murah)

Keep an eye on the Israeli weather maps if it looks like a big storm is coming, so you’ll be well-informed.

37- Ice has formed on the window - קרח נוצר על החלון.קרח נוצר על החלון (Ke’rakh notsar al ha-kha’lon).

You could try this phrase out on the hotel’s helpful cleaning staff, or fix the problem yourself. Just add a scoop or two of salt to a spray bottle of water - that should work!

38- Large hailstones - גושי ברד גדולים (gu’shei ba’rad g’dolim)

As a kid, I found hail crazy exciting. Not so much now - especially if I’m on the road and large hailstones start pummeling my windscreen!

Large Hailstones on a Wooden Floor

39- Rolling thunder - רעם מתגלגל (ra’am mitgal’gel)

The rumble of rolling thunder is that low-volume, ominous background sound that goes on for some time. It’s strangely exciting if you’re safely in your hotel room; it could either suddenly clear up, or escalate to a storm.

40- Sleet - גשם-שלג (geshem-sheleg)

Sleet is tiny hard pieces of ice made from a mixture of rain and melted snow that froze. It can be messy, but doesn’t cause major damage the way hail does. Pretty cool to know this word in Hebrew!


2. Words for the first day of spring

You know the feeling: your heart skips a beat when you wake up and spring has sprung! Spring will reward you with new blossoms everywhere, birdsong in the air, kittens being born in the neighborhood and lovely views when you hit the trails. Pack a picnic and ask a new Israeli friend to show you the more natural sights. Don’t forget a light sweater and a big smile. This is the perfect time to practice some Hebrew spring words!

Spring Vocabulary


3. Do You Know the Essential Summer Vocabulary?

Summer! Who doesn’t love that word? It conjures up images of blue skies, tan skin, vacations at the beach and cruising down the coast in an Alfa Romeo, sunglasses on and the breeze in your hair. Of course, in Israel there are many ways to enjoy the summer - it all depends on what you love to do. One thing’s for sure: you will have opportunities to make friends, go on picnics, sample delicious local ice-cream and maybe even learn to sing some Hebrew songs. It’s up to you! Sail into Israeli summer with this summer vocab list, and you’ll blend in with ease.

Four Adults Playing on the Beach in the Sand


4. Must-Know Autumn vocabulary

Victoria Ericksen said, “If a year was tucked inside of a clock, then autumn would be the magic hour,” and I agree. Who can resist the beauty of fall foliage coloring the Israeli landscape? Birds prepare to migrate; travelers prepare to arrive for the best weather in Israel.

The autumnal equinox marks the moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator, making day and night almost equal in length. The cool thing about this event is that the moon gets really bright – the ‘harvest moon’, as it’s traditionally known.

So, as much as the change of season brings more windy and rainy days, it also brings celebration. Whether you honor Thanksgiving, Halloween or the Moon Festival, take some time to color your vocabulary with these Hebrew autumn words.

Autumn Phrases


5. Winter

Winter is the time the natural world slows down to rest and regroup. I’m a summer girl, but there are fabulous things about winter that I really look forward to. For one, it’s the only season I get to accessorize with my gorgeous winter gloves and snug down coat!

Then, of course, there’s ice skating, holiday decorations and bonfires. As John Steinbeck said, “What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness?” Get ready for the cold season with our list of essential Winter words!

Skier Sitting in the Snow


6. HebrewPod101 can prepare you for any season.

Now that you know how to inquire and comment on the weather in Israel, you
can confidently plan your weather-ready travel itinerary. How about this for an idea: the next
time you’re sitting in a Israeli street café, try asking someone local this question:

“Do you think the weather will stay like this for a few days?” If you loved learning these cool Hebrew weather phrases with us, why not take it a step further and add to your repertoire? HebrewPod101 is here to help!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Time Phrases in Hebrew

The Hebrew Calendar: Talking About Dates in Hebrew

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Did you know there are many different types of calendars?

As you probably know - a calendar is a system of organizing days in weeks and months for specific purposes, according to Wikipedia.

Worldwide, most countries use the Gregorian calendar. Some just work on the same framework, meaning that time is divided into units based on the earth’s movement around the sun - the “solar calendar”. Other calendars keep time by observing the moon’s movements, a combination of the moon and the sun’s movements, and seasons.

Through HebrewPod101, you can learn all about this and so much more! Our themed, culturally relevant lessons are skillfully designed so you can do your planning perfectly for a holiday or a date.

Having a good plan for a visit or a trip is like studying well for an exam. You’re just so much better prepared! For that, you could well need specific phrases to plan around appointments and such, especially on business trips. Make sure to use the charts we provide here with the days of the week in Hebrew, as well as the months in Hebrew to navigate your way as you plan. Great resources!

Also - always remember to have fun!

Table of Contents

  1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Hebrew?
  2. Talking About your Plans
  3. Can HebrewPod101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Time Phrases in Hebrew


1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Hebrew?

Days of the Week

Well, that’s not a difficult question to answer. No matter why you’re travelling, it would be best to at least know the names of days and months in Hebrew. You don’t want to miss your flight or an appointment because you confused “יום שישי” (”yom shishi,” Friday) with “יום שבת” (”yom shabbat,” Saturday)! Or maybe you planned a holiday for “יולי” (”yuli,” July), but you booked a flight for “יוני” (”yuni,” June) by accident!

Avoid this confusion by learning the Hebrew calendar before you leave.

Now, as promised, the 15 phrases to help you make and discuss plans.


2. Talking About your Plans

Months of the Year

Perhaps you’re working in Israel, or maybe you’re enjoying a prolonged holiday. Fabulous! Memorize these phrases so you can be sure to successfully negotiate meetings, appointments, dates, events, the list goes on!

1. מה אתה עושה בסופ”ש הזה?

Mah atah ose ba-sofash haze?
“What are you doing this weekend?”

This question is usually a preamble to inviting someone somewhere. Given that it’s over the weekend, it probably means a casual get-together or another social event. (But not necessarily! A manager or boss could also ask this for entirely different reasons.)

It’s a handy phrase to know when you’ve made Israeli or expat friends in the country. Or, be the one doing the inviting. Then train your ear to learn the following phrases so you can understand the response.

2. אני נוסע בסוף השבוע הזה.

Ani nose’a be’sof ha’shavua.
“I am traveling this weekend.”

This could be a reply if you’re not available because you’re doing other fun stuff.

No matter why you are visiting Israel, do take the time to explore the country! It’s beautiful and it has so many wonderful, interesting spots ready to be visited.

Couple at booking in Desk

3. אני מתכוון להישאר בבית.

Ani mitkaven lehisha’er ba’bayit.
“I am planning to stay at home.”

Maybe you feel unwell, but don’t want to give too much information? Or maybe you have work to do? Perhaps you just need some quiet gardening time…it doesn’t matter. This response is polite and honest without oversharing.

It could also be a slightly open-ended response, depending on how you deliver it. Because hey, being home could still mean your plans are flexible, right?

That said - depending on your relationship with the inviter, nuances like these will probably not be so apparent in a foreign culture. So, best to use this excuse for declining an invitation only if you are truly set on staying in.

Woman Doing Gardening

4. השבוע אני עסוק.

Ha’shavua ani asuk.
“This week I am busy.”

Another polite phrase that gives a reason for declining an invitation but without oversharing details.

Don’t decline too many invitations, though! You don’t want people to think that you’re too busy to hang out with them. They will stop inviting you out, and you know how the saying goes - all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy…! Being social is good for the soul.

5. מחר אני חופשי.

Machar ani chofshi.
“I am free tomorrow.”

Yay! Perhaps you were approached by that person and they asked about your availability for a date. This would be a fine reply. Not too eager, but still indicating that you’re interested.

Or maybe you’re just replying to a colleague or manager’s request for a meeting. Polite, honest and clear.

Alternatively, you’re just busy right now, and plans are not going the way they were…well, planned. Compromise is a lovely thing! And this phrase sounds just like that.

Use it to indicate that you want to accommodate an invitation or the inviter’s plans, despite your current unavailability. Only if you are really free, of course.

6. האם נוכל לשנות את המועד?

Hayim nukhal leshanot et ha’moed?
“Can we reschedule this?”

So, life happened and you are unable to meet obligations or attend a planned meeting. This is a suitable question to ask if you wish to indicate your willingness to still engage with whatever is on the table.

Obviously you should (ideally) not ask to reschedule a party or big meeting! (Unless you’re the boss or it’s your own party, of course.) But if there’s reasonable wiggle room regarding arrangements, then this one’s your question.

Business Man Sitting with Schedule

7. יהיה לי מספיק זמן בסוף החודש.

Yihiye li maspik zman be’sof ha’chodesh?
“I will have enough time at the end of the month.”

A go-to phrase when events or activities are likely to take up a lot of your time, such as going away for a weekend, spending the day at a local market, or writing your manager’s quarterly report (with 20 flow-charts in Powerpoint) - anything that won’t only take an hour or two.

8. מתי יהיה הזמן המתאים ביותר עבורך?

Matay yihiye ha’zman ha’matyim beyoter avurkha?
“When is the best time that suits you?”

Remember phrase #5? That was a possible reply to this question. Asked by your crush, very possibly! Or, it could be asked by any other person for any other reason, doesn’t matter.

If this is addressed to you, it usually means that the person respects your time and schedule, which is a good thing. It probably also means that their own schedule is flexible, another good thing.

This is also a polite question to ask when a manager or senior colleague wants to meet with you. Let them decide on the time, and be as accommodating as possible. This attitude shows respect for seniority - good for career building. (Within reason, of course. You don’t need to postpone your wedding or your paid-up holiday to Australia because your manager wants to see you.)

Screen Tablet Hotel

9. האם התאריך הזה מתאים לך?

Hayim ha’ta’arikh haze mat’im lekha?
“Is this date OK with you?”

But - if the other party insists that you choose a time for a meeting, appointment, or date etc., then do so! Respond with this nice, somewhat casual question that leaves space for negotiation, but only needs a simple reply.

Suitable for friends, and casual acquaintances and colleagues.

10. האם אתה זמין ביום הזה?

Hayim ata zamin ba’yom haze?
“Are you available on that day?”

This is the a-bit-more-formal version of the previous question. Again, it has room for negotiation, but only needs a simple response - nice and neat!

Maybe this is the go-to question when you’re addressing your seniors at work, or a person much older than you.

11. האם נוכל לעשות זאת בהקדם האפשרי?

Hayim nukhal la’asot zot ba’hekdem ha’efshari?
“Can we do it as soon as possible?”

This question has an urgency to it that should preferably be responded to with the same. A simple reply will be good - yes or no. Less negotiable, this is still polite because it’s a question that gives you a choice.

But stand ready with one of the phrases in this article to help tie down a time and date!

Couple Getting Engaged on a Bridge

12. אני זמין בכל ערב.

Ani zamin be’khol erev.
“I’m available every evening”

If you’re going to reply with this phrase, context is everything.

- If it’s your manager asking you to put in a bit of overtime, and you are available to - great reply! When deadlines are tight and everybody is stressing, your willingness to go the extra mile can only improve your relationship with your boss.

(Still, no need to be a doormat! If you get asked to work overtime too often, or if everyone else is goofing around while you have to graft, then re-evaluate the situation. And if you feel you’re being exploited a bit, don’t stress! Equip yourself with the diplomatic, yet assertive responses right in this article.)

- If it’s an old friend or longtime significant other asking to hang out - good reply. You know one another and appearances don’t matter any longer.

- If it’s a new crush who just asked when you’d be available for a date - stop. Not such a great reply. Tone down a bit! “Interested but not overly eager” is what you’re going for here.

Refer back to response #5, or use a counter-question, such as #1. Whatever suits you.

But if they - or anyone else - invite you to scale the Himalayas with them, then the next phrase will probably be the only sane response!

Mountaineer in Snow

13. אני צריך לתכנן את זה מראש.

Ani tsarikh letakhnen et ze me’rosh.
“I need to plan this well in advance.”

So, as said under #9, perhaps you’re invited to join someone conquer the Himalayas.

Or your company manager wants you to plan the Party that Tops All Year-End Parties Forever.

Simply - if you get asked to do something that you know will need a lot of thorough planning, this is a good phrase to respond with.

It’s an assertive phrase that demonstrates two things regarding your attitude:

a) That you know your own abilities, and respect your own schedule.
b) That your respect other people’s time and schedule too.

Then just be sure to actually do that planning well in advance!

14. אנחנו צריכים למצוא תאריך אחר.

Anachnu tsrikhim limtso ta’arikh acher.
“We need to find another date.”

So, you’re in negotiations regarding a date.

This is an assertive statement that should probably not be used with a “My way or the highway” attitude.

That stuff only works in the movies - think sharp-tongued Samuel L. Jackson. Or fierce Kristen Stewart. Yea, they can be scary, so tone down that tone.

Also, be mindful that fickle people who change plans all the time don’t keep friends! Taking others’ needs into consideration, while simultaneously having your way is a delicate art that takes proper cultivation. Use this phrase sparingly - we have better ones here to negotiate with.

Rock Concert Hands in the Air

Of course, if your planned trip to the dentist falls on the same day as the only Billie Eilish concert close by…well, priorities are priorities. Feel free to call the dentist with this phrase. Or even better, use the next one.

15. אני לא יכול לעשות את זה ביום הזה.

Ani lo yakhol la’asot et ze ba’yom ha’ze.
“I cannot do it on that day.”

This is the low-key-but-still-firm cousin of the previous phrase. You’re stating a personal fact, and depending on your tone, this can be as non-negotiable as you prefer.

Again, only use this when you really mean it, if you’re visiting Israel or any other foreign country.

So, that’s it, folks! Which phrase did you find the most helpful? Let us know in the comments!


3. Can HebrewPod101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

Numbers

Well yes, of course!

We think you will find these phrases easy to use when talking about dates and months in Hebrew. But knowing how to employ them properly could help you avoid sticky situations!

HebrewPod101 is uniquely geared to help you with this and so much more.

This InnovativeLanguage.com initiative is one of many online language-learning courses. With us, you’ll find it easy and fun to learn a new language, and here are a few reasons why:

  • Immediately upon enrollment, you’ll receive hundreds of well-designed lessons to get you going.
  • Watch superb recordings of native Hebrew speakers in cool slide-shows - the easy way to practice till you sound just like a native speaker yourself!
  • Also immediately upon enrollment, you’ll get access to a huge library of free resources! These include extensive, theme-based Vocabulary Lists and a Word of the Day List (For free, hot bargains!) These alone are sure to give your vocab-learning boxing gloves.
  • You’ll also immediately be able to use an excellent and free Hebrew online dictionary. Necessary for quick, handy translations, no matter where you find yourself.
  • For the serious learner, there are numerous enrollment upgrades available, one of which offers you a personal, online Israeli host. Allow us to hold your hand and support you in your learning!

If you’re serious about mastering Hebrew easily yet correctly, HebrewPod101 is definitely one of, if not the best, online language learning platforms available. Talking about your plans or dates in Hebrew need not ever spoil your stay.

So, hurry up—enroll today!

HebrewPod101’s Essential Hebrew Travel Phrase Guide

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Traveling to foreign countries is nearly always an exciting, enriching, and beneficial experience. Yet, some things can be real downers, such as boredom on a lengthy flight to Israel. Really, binge-watching onboard movies can only be interesting for so long! And jet lag - another huge downer. Did you know that jet lag is more severe when you travel from the West to the East?

Well, we won’t know how to beat that, but there are fortunately plenty of remedies around to investigate.

To beat flight boredom, though, we may have the answer for you at HebrewPod101! Why don’t you take the time to study Hebrew travel phrases? We make this super easy and fun, with great downloadables, like our PDF Cheat Sheets. Quickly memorize these, and impress your Israeli friends or travel guide with your flawless Hebrew!

Table of Contents

  1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases
  2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words
  3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases
  4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country
  5. HebrewPod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

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1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases

Impressing Israeli people or your travel partners will be the least of the benefits you reap from learning these helpful phrases. These are greater ones:

1) Eliminate Travel Frustration: First of all, you’ll be able to cut out a good chunk of travel frustration and inconvenience due to language barriers.

Know how to pronounce and use at least the basic Hebrew phrases, and then just look foreign. This should go a long way to help you get by and win you friends, because locals would be more inclined to help someone who took the trouble to learn a smidgen of their language.

Injured Woman In An Ambulance

2) Emergency Readiness: In case of an emergency, you will be able to get help a lot quicker if you know how to ask for what in Hebrew. Imagine miming to a doctor or nurse that you have a sore ear but that you’re allergic to penicillin. Not so easy, right?

Rather, you should know basic emergency travel phrases, especially if you suffer from a serious condition. Also, information about life-threatening allergies you have should always be on your person in the language of the country you’re visiting.

3) Sight-Seeing Readiness: Hopefully, you also travel to learn more about a country’s culture. Visiting the main tourist sites in Israel will be more interesting if you know how to ask pertinent questions in Hebrew.

In this blog, we’ll also be giving you important travel phrases to consider - from the 13 essential must-have phrases to ones that are just generally useful and good to know.

Let’s get cracking!


2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words

Preparing to Travel

Seasoned explorers of multiple countries will tell you that certain words and phrases are absolute must-knows in anyone’s travel vocabulary. Learning from them, we collated some of the most essential ones here for you.

If you know these travel phrases and words by heart in Hebrew, you will be much better equipped for your visit than most of your movie-binging travel mates.

1) תודה / toda (Thank you)

As a tourist, you will be relying on the kindness of strangers to get by. Repay them with a small acknowledgment of their friendly generosity - know how to say “thank you” in Hebrew.

2) אתה מדבר אנגלית? / ata medaber anglit? (Do you speak English?)

While it may be a bit of a cop-out, sometimes you just can’t figure out how to communicate. Maybe you’re blanking on one specific word you need, maybe they’re speaking with a heavy accent, or maybe it’s just really late and you really want to get to the hotel. In that case, try asking if they speak English, and hopefully you can make things a little bit simpler for yourself.

Don’t abuse this phrase, though! If you just try to get by without learning any of the local language, not only will you not learn anything - you’ll be out of luck if they can’t speak English!

Man Greeting Someone

3) יש אוטובוס משדה התעופה לעיר? / yesh otoboos misde hate’ufa la’ir? (Is there a bus from the airport to the city?)

Public transit is usually cheaper, if slower, than taking a taxi or rideshare. Use this phrase to see if you can get where you’re going when you’re strapped for cash, or just when you’d like to take the scenic route into town!

4) זה האוטובוס הנכון לשדה התעופה? / ze ha’otoboos hanakhon lisde hate’ufa? (Is this the right bus for the airport?)

Likewise, if you’re the kind of person who can get themselves moving early (or maybe you just have a late flight), maybe you want to take the bus to the airport rather than taking a cab. If that’s the case, you’ll want to be sure you’re actually heading the right way! You wouldn’t want to end up at a lookout point half an hour away, watching your flight take off in the distance, would you?

5) סליחה, כמה עולה נסיעה? / slikha, kama ola nesi’a? (Excuse me, what’s the fare?)

If you are paying for a cab, you’ll want to know how much. Most legal taxis will have meters, but when dealing with a currency you’re not familiar with, it can be worth asking just to double check that you’re paying the right amount - especially if the currency has cents.

6) הזמנתי מקום / hizmanti makom (I have a reservation)

This one you can expect to use at least a few times throughout your trip, unless you’re the kind of person who travels by the seat of their pants and just goes to whatever hotel, motel, or hostel has rooms available.

7) יש לכם חדרים פנויים הלילה? / yesh lakhem khadarim pnu’eem halayla? (Do you have any vacancies tonight?)

If that’s the case, you’ll definitely be using this phrase instead. Quite possibly a lot, depending on how lucky you are!

Couple with a Map

8 ) איפה תחנת הרכבת? / efo takhanat harakevet? (Where is the train station?)

If you’re in a country with an expansive commuter rail system (or maybe just a fan of other types of locomotives), you may want to know where the closest station is. Just don’t go looking for pennies on the rails!

9) אני אלרגי לבוטנים / ani alergi lebotnim (I am allergic to peanuts)

Replace “peanuts” with whatever the word for your allergen may be. If your allergy is serious, you probably already know the importance of stating this very clearly in Hebrew.

If the condition is life-threatening, be sure to have a letter or prescription from a medical professional in Hebrew on your person at all times. Consider getting a medical alert bracelet specially made in Hebrew if your stay will be longer than a month or so.

Person Declining Meat

10) יש לכם מנות צמחוניות? / yesh lakhem manot tzim’khonyot? (Do you have any vegetarian dishes?)

If you dislike eating certain things, or you have certain dietary restrictions, it would be best if you knew how to convey this clearly in Hebrew.

Remember, though, that saying “I’m vegan” or “I’m diabetic” may not be enough to get you what you want. The rules for veganism and vegetarianism are not standard everywhere in the world. Also, your patron might not understand what “diabetic” means. If you have a medical condition, it would be best to research some in-depth vocabulary beforehand.

11) אפשר לקבל מפה? / ef’shar lekabel mapa? (Could I get a map?)

Planning on exploring your destination? Hopelessly lost? Maybe just an amateur cartographer? No matter the reason, this phrase is sure to come in handy. That said, you’re more likely to get use out of it at some sort of tourist or travel center than you are asking a random passerby on the street.

12) כמה זה עולה? / kama ze ole? (How much is this?)

Even if you’re not a big shopper, you’re probably going to need this phrase at some point. Knowing how to count in Hebrew will, of course, help a lot with purchases too.

13) אתם מקבלים כרטיסי אשראי? / atem mekablim kartisei ashrai? (Do you take credit card?)

This is another travel phrase that will smooth your monetary transactions considerably.

Man Giving Credit Card to a Clerk


3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases

Travel Verbs

Unlike the previous phrases, these are not really essential so much as they are useful. Yet, knowing these will still smooth over some bumps on your journey, more than just knowing the crucial phrases would.

1) יש אינטרנט אלחוטי בחינם? / yesh internet al’khuti be’khinam? (Is the Wi-Fi free?)

If you’re abroad, your normal cellular plans probably won’t have any service, and you’ll be totally reliant on publically available Wi-Fi while you’re out and about. Just ask a server, clerk, or attendant, and they’ll be happy to let you know. Just make sure you’re paying attention when they tell you the password!

2) אתה יכול לצלם אותי, בבקשה? / ata yakhol letzalem oti, bevakasha? (Could you take a picture of me please?)

What would a trip be with no photos to commemorate the event? Just be sure to ask this of someone who actually looks like they’d be willing to, unless you’re willing to risk being given the cold shoulder or worse. If you’re at a tourist attraction, you’ll find that most people are more than happy to take one for you, so long as you take one of them as well!

3) יש לך המלצות? / yesh lekha hamlatzot? (Do you have any recommendations?)

Eating alone in a restaurant? Or going out with new Israeli friends or business colleagues? Let them help you decide what to have.

4) אני רוצה מושב במקום ללא עישון, בבקשה / ani rotze moshav bemakom lelo ishun, bevakasha (I’d like to have a non-smoking seat, please)

Though smoking has gone out of fashion in some places, it’s still popular in others. In the event you’re at a restaurant where smoking is allowed on premises, you can always ask this question to the staff and be seated elsewhere.

5) מים, בבקשה / mayim, bevakasha (Water, please)

If you’ve emptied your glass, or are cutting yourself off after a few drinks, you can always ask for some water. It can be especially useful if the restaurant is busy to the point you need to call out to someone to get service.

6) אפשר לקבל את החשבון? / efshar lekabel et ha’kheshbon? (Could I have the check?)

To finish off the restaurant related phrases, if you’re eating with friends or really want to impress your colleagues, taking the bill can be a nice treat for them. Of course, this phrase could come in handy as well if you’re eating alone and you’re just impatient to leave.

7) מה אתה ממליץ לקנות למזכרת? / ma ata mamlitz liknot lemazkeret? (What do you recommend for a souvenir?)

Now that your trip is over, what better way to cap it all off than a memento, or maybe a gift for friends and family at home? It’ll be nicer to have something recommended by the locals than a cheap bauble from the airport store, so go ahead and ask someone you’ve met what they think.


4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country

Survival Phrases

When traveling, it’s possible to keep communication smooth when you don’t share a language.

Do so by keeping these five tips in mind. They are aimed to help you communicate with those who cannot speak English very well, and also to keep your traveling experience pleasant!

1. Keep your English simple and easy to understand.
If the person you are talking to speaks very little English, use basic verbs, adjectives, and nouns, and keep sentences short.

However, don’t patronize them by talking in pidgin or like you would address a child. Keep your speech simple but natural, and use the correct grammar.

For instance, don’t say: “You come when?”. If you say: “When will you come?”, you will very likely be understood, and may even help someone who wants to improve their English.

2. Ask someone to write information down.
Apply Rule 1 first at your hotel, where the staff is very likely to be able to speak some English. Get them to write down, in their native language, things like: “I would like to go to the airport, please,” “Please take me to the beach,” or “Where is the closest bathroom?”

These written questions are something you can then give to taxi drivers or any other people who are willing and able to help you. This simple step could make your life a lot easier when you travel to a foreign country!

3. Avoid asking leading questions!
If you want the correct information from a non-native English speaker, that is.

When you need directions, for instance, don’t ask: “To get to the bus stop, do I need to turn left here?” If the person didn’t really understand you, you will probably just get a smile and a “Yes,” which could possibly make you miss your bus.

Rather, you should ask: “Where is the bus stop?” If they understand you, you will get the correct directions.

4. Pick the right person to ask for help.
Time to look at people and think a bit about their appearance! A younger person who looks like they might be a student is more likely to have English skills than the friendly but ancient lady smiling at you from a fruit stall.

If you don’t see anyone like that, head into town to the nearest bank, hospital, pharmacy, or hotel. The staff at those places usually speak a bit of English.

5. Know when to quit.
If you stuck to the above rules, but the person you are talking to only stares at you blankly, say thank you and leave. Hanging around hoping someone will suddenly understand and respond is just wasting your time, and may irritate them as well. Go find someone else.


5. HebrewPod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

So, reader, have you found this article helpful?

Do you feel comfortable enough to use some essential travel phrases in Hebrew? We’d also love to hear if you think we left out important travel phrases. Leave your suggestions and opinions in the comments!

HebrewPod101 takes the lead with many free learning tools to help you master Hebrew reading and speaking easily, and in fun ways.

These tools include:

- An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
- A new Hebrew word to learn every day
- Quick access to the Hebrew Key Phrase List
- A free Hebrew online dictionary
- The excellent 100 Core Hebrew Word List
- An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

You will also have access to topic-specific recordings like our Before You Travel: Survival Phrases lesson.

Learn even more efficiently with the help of a personal tutor, after taking an assessment test to personalize and tailor your training.

Getting a tutor is also a good option if you meet challenges in your learning, or need to fast-track correct pronunciation and diction. Your very own friendly, Hebrew-speaking teacher will be only a text away on a special app, anywhere, anytime - an excellent option for business persons!

Using a guided learning system that was developed by experts in language and online education, you’ll receive personal feedback and constant support to improve in no time. You’ll also be tasked with weekly assignments in reading, writing, and speaking to hone your Hebrew speaking skills.

Imagine how impressed your Israeli friends or colleagues will be when you display your excellent conversational skills! With HebrewPod101, getting there will be easy and fun.

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How to Use Hebrew Numbers for Daily Usage

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Especially if you’re planning a prolonged visit to Israel, using the correct Hebrew numbers for counting in Hebrew could be very important! Number systems are the other alphabet in any language. In fact, it is a language all of its own, and it serves a multitude of excellent purposes.

Table of Contents

  1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems
  2. Why is it Important to Learn Hebrew Numbers?
  3. Learning Hebrew Numbers
  4. Why Choose HebrewPod101 to Learn all about Hebrew Numbers?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Count to One Billion in Hebrew


1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems

Abacus

1. The Ishango Bone

The origin of counting, and with it numbers, is not clear to historians. While their art showed that prehistoric man had a concept of numbers, the first indication of a formal system was found to be only between 20,000 and 35,000 thousand years old. This discovery came around 1960 in the form of the so-called Ishango Bone found in the Congo, Central Africa.

The 10cm/4 inch piece of bone was a fibula from a baboon. It showed markings with a neat, unified pattern of small lines - far too organized and sophisticated to have formed spontaneously. Archeologists believe that those thin markings were carved to keep score of, or count, something. The lines seemed to represent a sequence of prime numbers and a series of duplications. Some even called it the first-ever pocket calculator!

2. Mesopotamia and Greece

Yet, evidence suggests that it wasn’t until about 4,000 years ago that humans truly started counting and using numbers. Together with the development of civilization came developed agriculture, and the need for measurement and score-keeping was increased.

For this reason, a formal number system and mathematics were developed first in the Middle East, in what was then called Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia was roughly situated in the area of modern-day Iraq and Kuwait. Allegedly, the system was pretty simple at first. Citizens used tokens that represented a certain number of items, such as one token equalling four goats, etc. This eventually evolved into a system of score marks pressed into clay, which ultimately went on to influence Greek mathematics.

3. Hindu-Arabic Numbers

Zero, meanwhile, was conceived later and elsewhere. Inspired by the Hindu religion, which allows for the concept of infinity and eternity, the Indians invented a symbol to represent nothing. The magic of the zero lies not in itself but its combination with other numbers.

The Indians were also the creators of today’s numbers, which are often referred to as Hindu-Arabic numbers. These comprise one or a combination of just ten symbols or digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 0.

Europe learned of this numeric system only around 1200 A.D., when they were introduced to it by an Italian mathematician called Leonardo Pisano Bigollo.

Pisano, also known as Fibonacci, is famous for the discovery of a mathematical sequence with countless applications. Yes, math buffs, it’s the well-known Fibonacci sequence, also called the Golden Mean.

The Roman numeric system, which was clumsy next to the newer inventions, gradually lost popularity in the West. It’s from here that they “slowly spread to conquer the world,'’ as Steven Law puts it.


2. Why is it Important to Learn Hebrew Numbers?

For us at HebrewPod101, this is an easy question to answer! Because we know that numbers are a global unifier.

Counting and numbers have made our lives easier since they were first formulated, even in their most primitive forms.

Numbers in Industry

Without knowing your numbers, you can’t properly communicate about or deal with the following:

1) Your date/time of birth, i.e., your age: This is vital information to be able to give to people like doctors, employers, law enforcement, and so forth.

2) Banking: Worldwide, our monetary systems are built on numbers. Interest, credit scores, and loans all rely on math beyond simple finger counting.

3) Time: Without knowing how to say numbers, you can’t talk or ask about the time and expect to get a useful response. You don’t want to miss an appointment or schedule something for the wrong hour!

4) Ordering data: Numbers bring order to a mostly random life! Scientists even say that numbers and the way they are organized underpin the whole universe. From using them to count your meals’ calories and the number of likes your posts get on social media, to drawing up intricate data charts and explaining existence itself - numbers are what makes these things possible.

All of the above and more are reasons why it is important to know your numbers if you plan on travelling or becoming a foreign worker abroad, in Israel or anywhere else!

Little Girl Counting


3. Learning Hebrew Numbers

Now, let’s explore the Hebrew number system a bit more! Take a look at this infographic.

Language Numbers

Can you make out for yourself what the Hebrew numbers between one (1) and nine (9) look and sound like? Easy, right?

Or, if you struggled a bit, no problem. Why not listen to how Hebrew numbers one (1) through ten (10) sound when pronounced by our native Hebrew speaker and friendly HebrewPod101 teacher?

Then, share with us in the comments your native language’s romanized pronunciation of your number system. We’d love to see all the different ways the same numbers can be pronounced!

Hand With a Thumbs Up

When you have mastered the first ten numbers, you have basically nailed the most significant part of the number system. Well done! Curious to learn the numbers from eleven upward? No problem! Why not subscribe and enroll with us now to immediately enjoy this lesson, teaching you all about Hebrew numbers eleven (11) to one hundred (100)?

Finally, if you’re curious how the numbers look once you’ve broken one hundred, why not check out our Hebrew number vocabulary page? You can see the numbers we’ve just covered, all the way up to four thousand (4,000). Plus, you can also see the Hebrew words for different numbers used in example sentences, to get an idea of how you can use them in your day-to-day conversations!


4. Why Choose HebrewPod101 to Learn all about Hebrew Numbers?

HebrewPod101, like all Innovative Language Learning ventures, takes the pain out of learning a new language by adding a lot of fun. It’s never an easy thing to learn a new language, but we formulated all your lessons so they’re nicely bite-sized, and geared to keep you motivated!

Also, we created a great number of fantastic tools to help keep struggle and boredom out of the learning process.

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! HebrewPod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective, and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect with! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Hebrew!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Hebrew with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Hebrew dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about HebrewPod101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Hebrew teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Hebrew word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Hebrew level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

So, why wait? Sign up with HebrewPod101 right away! Also, let us know in the comments if you’ve used this blog post, or any of the free lessons anywhere to master Hebrew numbers. Or, even better - share your birthdate using what you’ve learned!

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How to Say Sorry in Hebrew

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Learn how to apologize in Hebrew - fast and accurately! HebrewPod101 makes it easy for you to make amends. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Hebrew Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

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Table of Contents

  1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Hebrew
  2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Hebrew
  3. Audio Lesson - Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”
  4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Hebrew through HebrewPod101


1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Hebrew

3 Ways to Say Sorry

Nobody’s perfect, not anywhere in the world. Everybody makes mistakes, and does and says regrettable things. Then it’s time to apologize, as saying ‘I’m sorry’ is not in vain. It can be very healing! Did you know that hearing a sincerely-meant apology can have a noticeable effect on a person’s body? Research has shown that it slows down breathing and heart rate, and even causes a drop in blood pressure.

Sometimes we cannot fix what’s broken, but we can make the experience a bit easier for anyone who suffered on account of our thoughtless actions or words.

Here are a number of ways to say sorry in Hebrew. In any language, just make sure you really mean it! An insincere apology will not go down well with anyone.

Woman Apologizing

אני מתנצלת (ani mitnatzelet).
I’m sorry

These words should precede anything else you have to say. Use them sincerely and whenever you are clearly in the wrong. Acknowledging your guilt and apologizing for any wrongdoing will lift your spirits too! Often, remorse can eat away at us, and a simple ‘I’m sorry’, in Hebrew or any other language, can open the door for forgiveness and resolution of a bad situation. It can be a true gift!

ברצוני להתנצל (birtzoni lehitnatzel).
I would like to apologize.

This is a slightly more formal way to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Hebrew. Use this phrase if you’re addressing your superiors and/or elders.

אני מתנצלת בכנות (ani mitnatzelet bekhenut).
I sincerely apologize.

If you feel strongly about your apology, this is another slightly more formal phrase to use. Keep it handy for graver errors, or you might come across as insincere!

לא אעשה את זה שוב (Lo e’ese et ze shuv).
I won’t do it again.

A promise you can only make if you intend to keep it! Few things feel as bad as having to hear repeated apologies from someone for the same behavior - it means the ‘sorry’ is not sincere. Don’t be that person!

אני אוודא לא לחזור על הטעות הזו שוב (ani evade lo lachzor al hata’ut hazo shuv).
I’ll make sure not to make this mistake again.

A beautifully strong phrase! Again, say this only if you mean it - not just in the moment, but always! A bit more formal, this is an especially good phrase to use when apologizing to superiors and/or elders. It will make an especially good impression at the workplace, where accountability is an excellent quality to display!

לא התכוונתי לזה (Lo hitkavanti leze).
I didn’t mean that.

This is a tricky one… What did you mean, then?! Clear up any confusion with sincerity. Also, use this phrase only if the harm done or mistake made was due to an accident, and then admit to thoughtlessness on your part, if appropriate.

זו אשמתי (zo ashmati).
It’s my fault.

If the fault is really yours, own up to it. You will gain respect in the eyes of others! However, don’t take the blame when it’s not truly yours. It won’t be good for you, and ultimately you will not be respected much for it.

סליחה שהייתי אנוכית (slicha she’hayiti anokhit).
I’m sorry for being selfish.

This is a good phrase to keep handy, especially for your close relationships. It is difficult to admit you’re selfish, isn’t it?! However, it’s good to know when to be honest. We get used to our loved ones, which often means we forget that they need our good manners and unselfish behavior just as much as strangers do.

אני מקווה שתסלח לי (ani mekave shetislach li).
I hope you will forgive me.

This is a polite and gentle wish that can smooth over many harsh feelings. It also shows that the other person’s opinion and forgiveness are important to you.

אני לוקחת את מלוא האחריות (ani lokakhat et mlo ha’achrayut).
I take full responsibility.

This strong statement is similar to admitting that an error or transgression was your fault. It speaks of courage and the willingness to take remedial action. Good one to use…if you mean it!

לא הייתי צריכה לעשות את זה (lo hayiti tzrikha la’asot et ze).
I shouldn’t have done it.

This phrase is fine to use if you did or said something wrong. It shows, to an extent, your regret for having done or said what you did, and demonstrates that you understand your role in the mistake.

סליחה שהתעכבתי בהחזרת הכסף (slicha shehit’akavti behachzarat hakesef).
Sorry for giving your money back late.

It’s rotten to have to loan money! Yet, it’s equally rotten to have to ask for the repayment of a loan. So, do your best not to pay late in the first place, but if it can’t be helped, this would be a good phrase to use!

בבקשה אל תכעס עלי (bevakasha al tikh’as alay).
Please don’t be mad at me.

Well, this is not a very advisable phrase to use if you are clearly in the wrong. If someone is justifiably angry with you, asking them not to be mad at you would be an unfair expectation. However, if you did something wrong by accident, and if the consequences were not too serious, this request would be OK.

סליחה על האיחור (slicha al ha’ichur).
Sorry I’m late.

Punctuality is valued in most situations, but if you really cannot help being late, then apologize! This way you show respect for your host, and win their approval.

אני מתנצלת שהייתי מרושעת כלפיך (ani mitnatzelet she’hayiti merusha’t clapeikha).
I apologize for being mean to you.

Acknowledging your own meanness towards someone is no small thing, so good for you! Use this apology only if your intention is to seriously address your mean tendencies, or these words could become meaningless over time.


2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Hebrew

Woman Refusing

Congratulations! Now you know how to apologize in Hebrew! After you have apologized for a mistake, focus on fixing whatever you can, and don’t punish yourself over something that cannot be taken back or reversed. That’s healthy for you! Regret can eat away at the soul, and even destroy it. It is ultimately a useless emotion if it consumes you.

However, in language, we use apologies not only when we’ve transgressed or made mistakes. They come in handy in other situations too, when there has been no wrongdoing. Sometimes we need to express regret for having to refuse a gift, an offer, or an invitation. This can be somewhat tricky. Learn from specialists at HebrewPod101 about how to use the correct Hebrew words for this kind of ‘sorry’!


3. Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”

Say Sorry

On the run and need a quick lesson on how to say sorry in Hebrew? Don’t fret, just listen and repeat! Click here for a recorded short lesson and learn how to give the perfect apology, with perfect pronunciation in Hebrew. A little can go a long way, and you will sound like a native!


4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Hebrew through HebrewPod101

Man Looking at Computer

Online learning is here to stay, that’s a fact. In 2015, the Digital Learning Compass Partnership released a report based on surveys to determine online enrollment trends in US institutions for higher education. Thirty percent of all their students learned online! And the number is growing! However, how can you be sure you will not regret your choice of an online language learning school? First, look at the school’s credentials and what it has to offer…

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! HebrewPod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect to! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Hebrew!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Hebrew with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Hebrew dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about HebrewPod101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. Your can have your very own Hebrew teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Hebrew word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Hebrew level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

After this lesson, you will know almost every ‘sorry for’ in Hebrew, but don’t let it be that you’re sorry for missing a great opportunity. Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in HebrewPod101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Hebrew!

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Learn How to Confidently Introduce Yourself In Hebrew

Start off the year by learning how to introduce yourself properly in Hebrew! Learn easily with HebrewPod101 in this four-minute video!

Table of Contents

  1. 10 Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself in Hebrew
  2. Important Tips for Introducing Yourself
  3. Video - How to Introduce Yourself in Hebrew
  4. Why HebrewPod101 is Perfect for Learning all about Hebrew Introductions

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1. 10 Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself in Hebrew

First impressions are absolutely everything! Right? No, wrong - who you are every day is much more important. But first impressions are definitely not unimportant either. Make sure to introduce yourself correctly, as it could mean the difference between getting a job offer or a polite refusal from an employer. HebrewPod101 shows you how to read, write and pronounce these self-introductions and conversation-starters like a native speaker!

But first, a tip - wait to be asked before offering personal details such as your age. Good conversation is about unspoken reciprocity, and giving too many personal details too soon can be embarrassing for your Israeli friend. Rather use phrases that encourage your friend to talk about him or herself - most people like doing that! Also, it shows you take real interest in other people.

1- Hello, it’s nice to meet you.

שלום, נעים להכיר אותך.
shalom, na-eem lehakir otkha.

This phrase is an excellent way to start an introduction. It is a greeting that immediately expresses interest in the other person.

2- My name is Talia.

שמי טליה.
shmi Talia.

Self-explanatory - just replace ‘Talia’ with your own name! Also, pay close attention to what your new Israeli acquaintance’s name is. Remembering it will make them feel that you are really interested in him/her as a person!

Countries

3- I’m from Israel.

אני מישראל.
ani me’Israel.

Sharing something about yourself is a nice conversation starter. It shows that you’re willing to engage meaningfully with the other person. In an informal setting, you can expect the other person to respond in kind. At work, this is probably information you need to volunteer only if asked. Again, remember to replace ‘Israel’ with your own country of birth!

4- I live in Jerusalem.

אני גר בירושלים.
ani gar be’yerushalaim.

Same as above - replace ‘Jerusalem’ with your town or city of abode!

5- I’ve been learning Hebrew for a year.

אני לומד עברית כבר שנה. אני לומד עברית כבר שנה.
ani lomed ivrit kvar shanah.

Say this only if it’s true, obviously. And prepare to dazzle your audience! If you have indeed worked faithfully at your Hebrew for a year, you should be pretty good at it! Use this phrase after your introduction - it is likely to indicate that you wish to engage in Hebrew conversation.

Two people talking

6- I’m learning Hebrew at HebrewPod101.com.

אני לומד עברית עם עברית פוד וואן או וואן דוט קום.
ani lomed ivrit eem ivrit pod wan o wan dot kom.

This will be the best reply if anyone asks (Very impressed, of course!) where you study Hebrew! Simply volunteering this information, especially in a casual conversation, could make you sound like a salesperson, and you want to avoid that. Often, an employer will want this information though, so best to memorize and have this phrase handy!

7- I’m 27 years old.

אני בן עשרים ושבע.
ani ben esrim ve’sheva.

This is a line that may just get you a ‘TMI!’ look from a stranger if you volunteer it without being asked. He/she may not be willing to divulge such an intimate detail about him/herself right at the start of your acquaintance, so don’t force reciprocity. However, it’s a good phrase to know in a job interview; again, probably best only if your prospective Israeli employer asks. Also, remember to give your true age!

First encounter

8- I’m a teacher.

אני מורה.
ani moreh.

You’re still offering information about yourself, which lends good momentum to keep the conversation going! Replace ‘teacher’ with your own occupation - and learn the related vocabulary with HebrewPod101!

People with different jobs

9- One of my hobbies is reading.

אחד התחביבים שלי הוא קריאה.
ekhad ha’takhbivim sheli hu kri-ah.

Your hobby is another topic with lots of potential for starting a good conversation! People are often eager to talk about their hobbies, and why they like them!

10- I enjoy listening to music.

אני נהנה להאזין למוסיקה.
ani nehene le’ha-azin le’muzika.

If you’re still talking about your hobbies, this would be a good line to go with the previous one. Otherwise, wait for your conversation partner to start talking about what they enjoy doing!

2. Important Tips for Introducing Yourself

Introducing yourself

A correct Hebrew introduction will make a good impression upon meeting a person for the first time. Why is this first impression important? Simple - it gives an indication of who you are as a person. So, while you want to be truthful when representing yourself, you also need to be prepared to put your best foot forward!

First impressions are often lingering and difficult to change. In addition, it’s easier to make a negative impression than a good one, often without intending to. So, how can you make sure that your self-introduction will impress Israeli natives?

1- Research: First, research the culture! Different cultures have different social rules, and you will be halfway towards making a great first impression if you know the proper Israeli customs for self-introductions. It will also help you avoid social mistakes - sometimes, what is acceptable in one culture is insulting in another, such as making eye contact, or giving a handshake. In your culture, what is appropriate when a person introduces him or herself?

Also, be sure to distinguish between introductions in different situations, such as a formal and a social situation. There are bound to be differences in how you address people! The internet can be an important tool for this endeavor. Alternatively, you could visit your local library to search for books on this topic, or you could ask Israeli friends to explain and demonstrate their cultural habits for introductions. Honoring someone’s culture shows that you respect it, and as we know - a little respect can go a very long way in any relationship!

Someone studying

2- Study the Correct Phrases and Vocabulary: Be sure to learn Hebrew phrases and vocabulary that tell people who you are, and that encourage them to engage in conversation with you. Each situation will determine how to address the person you want to introduce yourself to. Also, make sure your pronunciation is correct! It would be most valuable to have Hebrew-speaking friends who can help you with this. Or read on for a quick phrase and video lesson on Hebrew introductions right here at HebrewPod101!

3- Appearance: This is pretty obvious - if you want to make a good impression introducing yourself to anyone for the first time, you need to be neatly dressed and well groomed! A shabby, dirty or careless appearance and bad body odor are to be avoided at all costs; in most cultures, these will not impress!

Also, make sure to dress appropriately, not only for the occasion, but also for the culture. For instance, bare shoulders or an open-necked shirt is an acceptable gear in many Western countries. Yet, in some cultures, dressing like this could deeply offend your host. No amount of good manners and properly expressed introductions is likely to wipe out a cultural no-no! So, be sure to know how to dress, and take care with your appearance when you are about to introduce yourself to someone for the first time!

Following are some neat phrases with which you can introduce yourself in Hebrew, and get a conversation started too!

3. Video - How to Introduce Yourself in Hebrew

Good, you read and perhaps even memorized the preceding phrases to successfully introduce yourself in Hebrew! Watch this short video now to get a quick lesson on Hebrew grammar for these introductions, as well as how to pronounce them correctly. You will sound like a native when you can copy the presenter perfectly!


4. Why HebrewPod101 is Perfect for Learning all about Hebrew Introductions

  • Culturally Focused Lessons: All our material is aimed not only to help you learn perfect Hebrew, but also to introduce you to the Israeli culture! Learn here, for instance, a list of favorite Israeli foods. Alternatively, listen to these audio lessons on Israeli culture! Studying through us could be very valuable before visiting Israel for any purpose.
  • Accurate and Correct Pronunciation & Inflection: Our hosts and voice actors are native Hebrew speakers of the best quality! It is important for us that you speak Hebrew correctly to avoid embarrassing misunderstandings and miscommunications. If you practice and can copy these presenters well, you will sound just like Hebrew natives and your introduction will be easily understood!
  • State-of-the-Art Lesson Formats and Methods: Efficacy in learning is our highest priority. You will have access to learning tools that were carefully developed by learning specialists over more than a decade! We use only well-researched, proven lesson formats and teaching methods to ensure fast, accurate, fun and easy learning! Millions of happy subscribers can’t be wrong! Create a lifetime account with HebrewPod101 for free access to many learning tools that are updated every week.
  • Learn to Read and Write in Hebrew: We don’t only teach you to speak, you can also learn to read and write in Hebrew! This way you can express your Hebrew introduction in more than one way and be thoroughly prepared.
  • A Learning Plan that Suits your Pocket: HebrewPod101 takes pride in making learning not only easy and fun, but also affordable. Opening a lifetime account for free will offer you a free seven-day trial, after which you can join with an option that suits your needs and means. Learning Hebrew has never been easier or more affordable! Even choosing only the ‘Basic’ option will give you access to everything you need to learn Hebrew effectively, like thousands of audio and video lessons! However, if you need to learn Hebrew fast, the Premium and Premium Plus options will be good to consider, as both offer a vast number of extra tools to ensure efficient learning. This way you can be sure that you will reach your learning goal easily!

Whatever your needs are for learning Hebrew, make sure to do it through HebrewPod101, and you will never have to google: “How do I introduce myself in Hebrew” again!

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How to Say I Love You in Hebrew - Romantic Word List

Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Hebrew could be just what you need to find it.

Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Hebrew partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At HebrewPod101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Hebrew lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Hebrew dating easy for you.

Table of Contents

  1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
  2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
  3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
  4. Hebrew Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
  5. Hebrew Quotes about Love
  6. Marriage Proposal Lines
  7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
  8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Hebrew Faster?

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1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

So, you have met your Hebrew love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Hebrew word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Hebrew date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

Hebrew Date Phrases

Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

  • רוצה לצאת איתי לארוחת ערב?
  • rotse latset yti learuchat erev?

The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Hebrew is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

Are you free this weekend?

  • אתה חופשי בסוף השבוע?
  • ata chofshi besof hashavua?

This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

Would you like to hang out with me?

  • רוצה לבלות יחד?
  • rotse levalot yachad?

You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

What time shall we meet tomorrow?

  • באיזו שעה אתה רוצה להפגש מחר?
  • be’eizo sha’a ata rotse lehipagesh machar?

Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

Where shall we meet?

  • איפה אתה רוצה להיפגש?
  • eifo ata rotse lehipagesh?

You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

You look great.

  • אתה נראה נהדר.
  • ata nir’eh neheder

A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

You are so cute.

  • אתה כל כך חמוד.
  • ata kol kakh chamud

If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

What do you think of this place?

  • מה אתה חושב על המקום הזה?
  • ma ata choshev al hamakom haze?

This another good conversation starter. Show off your Hebrew language skills!

Can I see you again?

  • רוצה להפגש שוב?
  • rotse lehipagesh shuv?

So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

Shall we go somewhere else?

  • רוצה ללכת למקום אחר?
  • rotse lalekhet lemakom acher?

If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

I know a good place.

  • אני מכירה מקום טוב.
  • ani mekira makom tov

Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

I will drive you home.

  • אני אסיע אותך הבייתה.
  • ani asiya otkha habayta

If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

That was a great evening.

  • זה היה ערב נהדר.
  • ze haya erev neheder

This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

When can I see you again?

  • מתי אני רואה אותך שוב?
  • matai ani roah otkha shuv?

If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

I’ll call you.

  • אני אתקשר אליך.
  • ani etkasher eleykha

Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

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2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

You learned all the Hebrew phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Hebrew below!

Date Ideas in Hebrew

museum

  • מוזאון
  • Museum

If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

go to the aquarium

  • ללכת לאקווריום
  • lalekhet la’akvaryum

Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

walk on the beach

  • ללכת על החוף
  • lalekhet al hachof

This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

have a picnic

  • לעשות פיקניק
  • la’asot piknik

If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

cook a meal together

  • לבשל ארוחה ביחד
  • levashel arucha beyachad

If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

have dinner and see a movie

  • ללכת לארוחת ערב וסרט
  • lalekhet learuchat erev veseret

This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

candlelit dinner

  • ארוחת ערב לאור נרות
  • aruchat erev leor nerot

A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

go to the zoo

  • ללכת לגן החיות
  • lalechet legan hachayot

This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

go for a long walk

  • לצאת להליכה ארוכה
  • latset lehalikha aruka

Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

go to the opera

  • ללכת לאופרה
  • lalekhet laopera

This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

Valentine's Day Words in Hebrew

Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Hebrew - think how impressed your date will be!

4. Hebrew Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Hebrew yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Hebrew? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Hebrew love on this special day!

Valentine's Day Words in Hebrew

I love you.

  • אני אוהב אותך.
  • ani ohev otkha.

Saying ‘I love you’ in Hebrew carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

You mean so much to me.

  • אתה כל כך חשוב לי.
  • ata kol kakh khashuv li.

This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

Will you be my Valentine?

  • התהיה בן זוגי בחג האהבה?
  • ha`tihiye ben zugi be`khag ha`ahava?

With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

You’re so beautiful.

  • את כל כך יפה.
  • at kol kakh yafa.

If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Hebrew, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

I think of you as more than a friend.

  • אני חושב עליך כיותר מידידה.
  • ani khoshev alaikh ke`yoter miydida.

Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Hebrew dating culture.

A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

  • מאה לבבות יהיו מעט מדי כדי להכיל את כל האהבה שלי אלייך.
  • mea levavot ihiyu meat midai kdei lehakhil et kol ha`ahava sheli elaikh.

You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

Love is just love. It can never be explained.

  • אהבה היא פשוט אהבה. היא אף פעם לא מוסברת.
  • ahava hi pashut ahava. hi af pa-am lo musberet.

If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

You’re so handsome.

  • אתה כל כך יפה.
  • ata kol kakh yafe.

Ladies, this phrase lets your Hebrew love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

I’ve got a crush on you.

  • אני דלוק עלייך.
  • ani daluk alaikh.

If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

You make me want to be a better man.

  • את גורמת לי לרצות להיות אדם טוב יותר.
  • at goremet li lirtsot lihiyot adam tov yoter.

Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Hebrew girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

Let all that you do be done in love.

  • עשה הכל באהבה.
  • ase hakol be`ahava.

We hope.

You are my sunshine, my love.

  • אתה הקרן אור שלי, האהבה שלי.
  • ata ha`keren or sheli, ha`ahava sheli.

A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

Words can’t describe my love for you.

  • מילים לא יכולות לתאר את האהבה שלי אלייך.
  • milim lo yekholot letaer et ha`ahava sheli elekha.

Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

We were meant to be together.

  • נועדנו להיות יחד.
  • noadnu lihiyot yakhad.

This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

  • אם חשבת על מישהו בזמן שקראת את זה, אתה ללא ספק מאוהב.
  • eem khashavta al mishehi bizman she`karata et ze, ata lelo safek meohav.

Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

5. Hebrew Quotes about Love

Hebrew Love Quotes

You’re a love champ! You and your Hebrew lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Hebrew that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

6. Marriage Proposal Lines

Hebrew Marriage Proposal Lines

Wow. Your Hebrew lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Hebrew custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

Hebrew Break-Up Lines

Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • אנחנו צריכים לדבר.
    • anakhnu tsrikhim le`daber.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • זה לא אתה. זה אני.
    • ze lo ata. ze ani.

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Hebrew lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • אני פשוט לא מוכן למערכת יחסים מהסוג הזה.
    • ani pashut lo mukhan le`ma-arekhet yakhasim meha`sug haze.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • בוא פשוט נהיה חברים.
    • bo pashut nihiye khaverim.

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Hebrew, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • אני חושב שאנחנו צריכים הפסקה.
    • ani khoshev she`anakhnu tsrikhim hafsaka.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • מגיע לך יותר טוב.
    • megi-ah lekha yoter tov.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • אנחנו צריכים להתחיל לצאת עם אנשים אחרים.
    • anakhnu tsrikhim lehatkhil latset eem anashim akherim.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • אני צריך את החופש שלי.
    • ani tsarikh et ha`khofesh sheli.

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • אני חושב שאנחנו מתקדמים מהר מדי.
    • ani khoshev she`anakhnu mitkadmim maher midai.

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • אני צריך להתמקד בקריירה שלי.
    • ani tsarikh le`hitmaked ba`karyera sheli.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • אני לא מספיק טוב בשבילך.
    • ani lo maspik tov bishvilekh.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • אני פשוט לא אוהב אותך יותר.
    • ani pashut lo ohev otakh yoter.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • אנחנו פשוט לא מתאימים.
    • anakhnu pashut lo mat-eemim.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • עדיף כך.
    • adif kakh.

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • התרחקנו אחד מהשניה.
    • hitrakhaknu ekhad meha`shniya.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Hebrew faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. HebrewPod101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Hebrew language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Hebrew Faster!

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    1- Being in a love relationship with your Hebrew speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    HebrewPod101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Hebrew, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Hebrew even faster.

    2- Having your Hebrew romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Hebrew language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Hebrew lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Hebrew partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why HebrewPod101 helps you learn Hebrew Even Faster when you’re In Love

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Hebrew is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at HebrewPod101 is translated into both English and Hebrew. So, while your partner can help you learn Hebrew faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Hebrew Culture
    At HebrewPod101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Israel. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Hebrew partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Hebrew Phrases
    You now have access to HebrewPod101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Hebrew soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    The Top 15 Ways to Say Hello in Hebrew

    Thumbnail

    Lewis Carroll, in the famous book Alice in Wonderland, wrote some of the best advice ever given: “Begin at the beginning.”

    When learning Hebrew, as with any language, there’s no better beginning than learning how to say hello in Hebrew. We say hello to people all the time, every day.

    Whether we want to greet a friend, start a conversation with a stranger to ask for directions, or perhaps introduce ourselves to someone we see from across the bar, knowing the right Hebrew greeting is essential!

    Is the first thing that comes to your mind when you think of hello in Hebrew shalom? You’re not alone, as this is the most common and popular way to say hello in Hebrew greetings.

    As in many languages, there are several different ways to say hello in Hebrew. How you say hello in Hebrew depends largely on the situation, setting, and who you’re talking to. Greetings can be formal, informal, general, situation- or time-specific, even imported from English or Arabic!

    That said, how do we boil down the answer to “What’s hello in Hebrew?”

    In the following lesson, we’ll take a look at these different Hebrew greetings so you can learn how to say hello in Hebrew in any situation, at any time, with confidence and comfort. Luckily, this language is generally not very grammar-intensive, so just sit back, relax, and have fun with these! Here we go!

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    Table of Contents

    1. General Greetings
    2. Situation-Specific Greetings
    3. Greetings with Questions
    4. Time-Specific Greetings
    5. How HebrewPod101.com Can Help!


    1. General Greetings

    Thumbnail

    Let’s begin with some general greetings. These are greetings in Hebrew that you can feel comfortable using in just about any situation. Before we dive in, however, it’s well worth mentioning that modern Hebrew—unlike Biblical Hebrew—doesn’t make very much use of formalities in spoken conversation.

    That being said, it’s best to avoid too much informality with the elderly or people of authority (such as police officers). In other words, the baseline of Hebrew is neither formal nor informal.

    This is exactly the way we could describe the most well-known Hebrew word for hello: שלום (shalom). Most of us know that this word means “peace.” However, it’s also the most classic of Hebrew greetings. It’s neither formal nor informal, and you can use it both to say hello and goodbye in Hebrew, to anyone! Let’s take a look.

    Doves in Flight

    • שלום
      Shalom
      Hello / Goodbye [literally “Peace” when translated]
    • שלום! אני מרגרט.
      Shalom! Ani Margaret.
      Hello! I’m Margaret.
    • שלום! נתראה מחר.
      Shalom! Nitra’eh machar.
      Goodbye! See you tomorrow.

    Note that if we use this word twice in a row, it can be used to add emphasis and warmth to our greeting:שלום, שלום. For example, if you want to say “Hello, friend” in Hebrew or even “Hello and welcome,” in Hebrew, this is a great way to go about it.

    • שלום, שלום, חברים. בואו כנסו.
      Shalom, shalom, chaverim. Bou kansu.
      Well, hello, friends, come on in.

    This next one is taken straight from English, so it should be a piece of cake for you!

    • היי
      Hay
      Hi
    • היי, אני שלי. איך קוראים לך?
      Hay, ani Sheli. Eykh korim lekha?
      Hi, I’m Shelley. What’s your name?

    The last common greeting we’ll look at is taken from Arabic. It’s used as a Hebrew slang for hello, so, while it will impress your Israeli friends, it’s best to avoid using it in formal settings.

    • אהלן
      Ahalan
      Hey

    Here’s how you would use this slang word to say “Hello brother,” in Hebrew:

    • אהלן, אחי! איזה טוב שבאת!
      Ahalan, achi! Eyzeh tov she-bata!
      Hey, brother. It’s great that you came!


    2. Situation-Specific Greetings

    Sundial

    Now that we’ve seen some general greetings, let’s have a look at greetings appropriate to specific situations. Just remember that you want to be sure you use them in the correct setting.

    The first one we’ll look at is a greeting that’s commonly used when we’re welcoming someone, for example, as a guest in our home or perhaps an invitee to a party we’re hosting.

    This greeting, ברוך הבא (barukh haba) literally means “Blessed is he who comes.” However, its connotation is akin to “Welcome.” Apart from the uses mentioned above, it can also be used in a more general sense if we’re simply welcoming someone who arrived from somewhere else. Note that it’s necessary to use the correct grammar in terms of masculine/feminine and singular/plural.

    • ברוך הבא.
      Barukh haba.
      Welcome. [speaking to men]
    • ברוך הבא. זה הבית שלנו.
      Barukh haba. Zeh habayit shelanu.
      Welcome. This is our home.
    • ברוכה הבאה.
      Brukha ha-ba’ah.
      Welcome. [speaking to a woman]
    • ברוכה הבאה. זה הבית שלנו.
      Brukha ha-ba’ah. Zeh habayit shelanu.
      Welcome. This is our home.
    • ברוכים הבאים.
      Brukhim ha-baim.
      Welcome. [speaking to men or a mixed group]
    • ברוכים הבאים. זה הבית שלנו.
      Brukhim ha-baim. Zeh ha-bayit shelanu.
      Welcome. This is our home.
    • ברוכות הבאות.
      Brukhot ha-ba’ot.
      Welcome. [speaking to women]
    • ברוכות הבאות. זה הבית שלנו.
      Brukhot ha-baot. Zeh ha-bayit shelanu.
      Welcome. This is our home.

    The next situational greeting we’ll see is used when answering the telephone. You may notice that this greeting is basically just a hebraicized version of “hello” in English. Allow yourself to chuckle at the sound of it, but remember that if you really want to sound like a native speaker, this is the way Israelis answer the phone!

    • הלו?
      Halo?
      Hello? [when answering the telephone]
    • הלו? עם מי אני מדברת, בבקשה?
      Halo? Im mi ani medaberet, bevakashah?
      Hello? With whom am I speaking, please?


    3. Greetings with Questions

    Woman Holding Question Mark

    The next category of greetings we’re going to look at are greetings with questions. Just like in English, there are quite a number of greetings that incorporate questions. These can either be used straight off the bat to greet someone, or can follow one of the general greetings we learned earlier, such as שלום (shalom) meaning “hello” or היי (hay) meaning “hi.” For example, you could use these phrases to say “Hello, how are you?” in Hebrew.

    1- More Formal

    • מה שְׁלוֹמְךָ?
      Mah shlomkha?
      How are you? [speaking to a man]
    • מה שלומך? שנזמין שולחן?
      Mah shlomkha? She-nazmin shulchan?
      How are you? Should we get a table?
    • מַה שְּׁלוֹמֵךְ?
      Mah shlomekh?
      How are you? [speaking to women]
    • מה שלומך? שנזמין שולחן?
      Mah shlomekh? She-nazmin shulchan?
      How are you? Should we get a table?
    • מַה שלומכם?
      Mah shlomkhem?
      How are you? [speaking to men or a mixed group]
    • מה שלומכם? שנזמין שולחן?
      Mah shlomekhem? She-nazmin shulchan?
      How are you? Should we get a table?
    • מַה שלומכן?
      Mah shlomkhen?
      How are you? [speaking to women]
    • מה שלומכן? שנזמין שולחן?
      Mah shlomkhen? She-nazmin shulchan?
      How are you? Should we get a table?

    2- More Informal

    Note that the following greetings are more informal, and should generally be used with people you’re already familiar with. These are phrases like “Hello, what’s up?” in Hebrew.

    • מה נשמע?
      Mah nishma?
      What’s up?
    • מה נשמע? איך העבודה החדשה?
      Mah nishma? Eykh ha-avodah ha-chadashah?
      What’s up? How’s the new job?
    • מה חדש?
      Mah chadash?
      What’s new?
    • מה חדש? כבר מצאתם דירה?
      Mah chadash? Kvar matzatem dirah?
      What’s new? Did you find an apartment yet?
    • מה קורה?
      Mah koreh?
      What’s happening?
    • מה קורה, גבר? שנים שלא ראיתי אותך!
      Mah koreh, gever? Shanim she-lo ra’iti otkha!
      What’s happening, man? I haven’t seen you for ages!
    • מה העניינים?
      Mah ha-inyanim?
      What’s going on?
    • היי, שלומית! מה העניינים? יש חדשות לגיי החתונה?
      Hay, Shlomit! Mah ha-inyanim? Yesh chadashot le-gabey ha-chatunah?
      Hey, Shlomit! What’s going on? Any news on the wedding?
    • מה המצב?
      Mah ha-matzav?
      What’s up?
    • מה המצב, איילת? למה לא באת לשיעור?
      Mah ha-matzav, Ayelet? Lamah lo bat la-shi’ur?
      What’s up, Ayelet? Why didn’t you come to class?


    4. Time-Specific Greetings

    The final category of greetings we’re going to see today are greetings that make reference to the time of day. Just as in most languages, it’s very common to greet people in such a time-specific way. Just as with the greetings that use questions, you can use the following greetings either by themselves or after using one of the general greetings we saw at the beginning of the lesson.

    The phrases we’ll go over in this section include things like “Hello, good day,” in Hebrew and “Hello, good morning,” in Hebrew.

    • בוקר טוב.
      Bokher tov.
      Good morning.
    • בוקר טוב! בא לך קפה?
      Bokher tov! Ba lekha kafeh?
      Good morning! Would you like coffee?
    • צהריים טובים.
      Tzohorayim tovim.
      Good afternoon.
    • צהריים טובים לכם. המונית שלכם מחכה בחוץ.
      Tzohorayim tovim lakhem. Ha-monit shelakhem mechakah bachutz.
      Good afternoon to you. Your taxi is waiting outside.
    • ערב טוב.
      Erev tov.
      Good evening.
    • ערב טוב. אני מקווה שתנוחו, ונתראה מחר!
      Erev tov. Ani mekaveh she-tanuchu, ve-nitraeh machar!
      Good evening. I hope you rest, and see you tomorrow!

    Note that, much like in English, לילה טוב (laylah tov) or “good night” is used not as a greeting, but rather as a farewell.


    5. How HebrewPod101.com Can Help!

    How to say hello in Hebrew isn’t too hard, right?

    As you can see, there are quite a few ways to say hello in modern Hebrew, so definitely get some practice in on these and use them to spice up your Hebrew! We’re here to help your practice, so that you can enrich your language ability and boost your confidence, right from the first hello!

    Remember that, as mentioned earlier, we Hebrew-speakers are generally not very formal when speaking on the street or among friends and family, so don’t feel uncomfortable giving a casual hello in Hebrew with people your age or people you already know! Just practice a few that you like and start using them as you greet Hebrew speakers.

    I hope you found this lesson helpful and fun. Feel free to check in and let us know if you feel confident about saying hey in Hebrew, or if you need some more tips! We look forward to hearing from you, and hope that you’ll continue visiting HebrewPod101.com on your journey to language mastery! Shalom!

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    How to Celebrate April Fools’ Day in Hebrew

    How to Celebrate April Fools' Day in Hebrew!

    Most everyone is familiar with this day, as it is celebrated nearly everywhere the world. Yet, when exactly is April Fools’ Day? And where did April Fools come from? April Fools’ Day is observed on April 1st every year. This day of jokes and pranks is believed to have stemmed from the 16th-century calendar change in France, when New Year’s Day was moved from April 1 to January 1. This action was taken due to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar.

    However, a few people were resistant to the calendar change, so they continued to observe New Year’s Day on April 1st, rather than the new date. They were referred to as the “April Fools”, and others started playing mocking tricks on them. This custom endured, and is practiced to this day around the world!

    Table of Contents

    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day
    2. Hebrew Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day
    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody
    4. How Can HebrewPod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?
    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Hebrew - Testing New Technology

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    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day

    Do you want to know how to say April Fools’ Day in Hebrew? Well, there are millions of ways and words, but here are the top one million Hebrew words you really need to know! Simply click this link. Here are some of them you will find useful:

    1. joke - התבדח - hit’ba’deach
    2. funny - מצחיק - matz’chik
    3. surprise - הפתעה - hafta-ah
    4. sneaky - חמקני - khamkani
    5. prankster - קנדס - kundas
    6. prank - מתיחה - metikhah
    7. play a joke - מעשה קונדס - ma’ase kundas
    8. lie - שקר - sheker
    9. humor - הומור - humor
    10. fool - טיפש - tipesh
    11. deceptive - מטעה - mat’eh
    12. April 1st - הראשון לאפריל - ha-rishon le-april

    2. Hebrew Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day

    Hebrew Phrases for April Fools' Day

    Don’t limit yourself to practical jokes - use these April Fools’ phrases in Hebrew to prank your favorite Hebrew speaking friend or colleague!

    1. I learned Hebrew in 1 month.
      • למדתי עברית בחודש אחד.
      • lamadeti ivrit be`khodesh ekhad.
    2. All classes for today got canceled.
      • כל השיעורים להיום בוטלו.
      • kol ha`shiurim le`hayom butlu.
    3. I’m sorry, but I’ve just broken your favorite pair of glasses.
      • אני מצטער, אבל הרגע שברתי את זוג המשקפיים האהוב עליך.
      • ani mitstaer, aval harega shavarti et zug ha`mishkafa-eem ha`ahuv alekha.
    4. Someone has just hit your car.
      • מישהו פגע הרגע במכונית שלך.
      • mishehu paga harega bam`khonit shelkha.
    5. I’m getting married.
      • אני מתחתן.
      • ani mitkhaten.
    6. You won a free ticket.
      • זכית בכרטיס חינם.
      • zakhita be`kartis khinam.
    7. I saw your car being towed.
      • ראיתי את המכונית שלך נגררת.
      • raiti et ha`mekhonit shelkha nigreret.
    8. They’re giving away free gift cards in front of the building.
      • מחלקים כרטיסי מתנה חינם בכניסה לבניין.
      • mekhalkim kartisei matana khinam ba`knisa la`binyan.
    9. A handsome guy is waiting for you outside.
      • בחור חתיך מחכה לך בחוץ.
      • bakhur khatikh mekhake lakh ba`khuts.
    10. A beautiful lady asked me to give this phone number to you.
      • אשה יפה ביקשה ממני לתת לך את מספר הטלפון הזה.
      • isha yafa biksha mimeni latet lekha et mispar ha`telefon haze.
    11. Can you come downstairs? I have something special for you.
      • את יכולה לרדת למטה? יש לי משהו מיוחד בשבילך.
      • at yekhola laredet lemata? yesh li mashehu meyukhad bishvilekh.
    12. Thank you for your love letter this morning. I never could have guessed your feelings.
      • תודה על מכתב האהבה שלך הבוקר. לעולם לא הייתי מנחשת שכך אתה מרגיש.
      • toda al mikhtav ha`ahava shelkha ha`boker. leolam lo haiti menakheshet she`kakh ata margish.

    Choose your victims carefully, though; the idea is to get them to laugh with you, not to hurt their feelings or humiliate them in front of others. Be extra careful if you choose to play a prank on your boss - you don’t want to antagonize them with an inappropriate joke.

    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody

    Choose Bad or Good

    Right, now that you know the top million April Fools’ words in Hebrew, let’s look at some super pranks and tricks to play on friends, colleagues and family. Some April Fools ideas never grow old, while new ones are born every year.

    Never joke in such a way that it hurts anyone, or humiliates them badly in front of others - the idea is for everybody to laugh and enjoy the fun! Respect is still key, no matter what day of the year it is.

    Cockroach prank

    1- Infestation

    This trick is so simple, yet so creepy, it’s almost unbelievable. Take black paper, cut out the silhouette of a giant cockroach, a spider or another insect, and stick it inside the lampshade of a table lamp. When the lamp is switched on, it will look like a monstrous insect is sitting inside the lampshade. Or, get a whole lot of realistic-looking plastic insects, and spread them over a colleague’s desk and chair, or, at home, over the kids’ beds etc. Creep-factor: stellar.

    2- Which One Doesn’t Fit?

    Put the photo of a celebrity or a notorious politician in a frame, and take it to work on April Fools’ Day. Hang the photo on the staff picture wall, and wait. You’ll be surprised how long it can take for people to notice that one picture doesn’t fit.

    3- Something Weird in the Restroom

    At work, replace the air freshener in the restroom with something noxious like insect killer, oven cleaner or your own odious mixture in a spray bottle. Be sure to cover the bottle’s body so no one suspects a swap.

    Or paint a bar of soap with clear nail polish, and leave it at the hand wash basin. It will not lather.

    Or, if your workplace’s restroom has partitioned toilets with short doors, arrange jeans or trousers and shoes on all but one of the toilet covers, so it looks like every stall is occupied. Now wait for complaints, and see how long it takes for someone to figure out the April Fools’ Day prank. You’ll probably wish you had a camera inside the restroom. But, unless you don’t mind getting fired, don’t put your own recording device in there!

    Funny Face

    4- Call Me Funny

    Prepare and print out a few posters with the following instructions: Lion Roar Challenge! Call this number - 123-456-7890 - and leave your best lion’s roar as voicemail! Best roarer will be announced April 10 in the cafeteria. Prize: $100. (Lion’s roar is just an example; you can use any animal call, or even a movie character’s unique sound, such as Chewbacca from Star Wars. The weirder, the funnier. Obviously!) Put the posters up in the office where most of the staff is likely to see them. Now wait for the owner of the number to visit you with murderous intent. Have a conciliatory gift ready that’s not a prank.

    5- Minty Cookies

    This is another simple but hugely effective prank - simply separate iced cookies, scrape off the icing, and replace it with toothpaste. Serve during lunch or tea break at work, or put in your family’s lunch boxes. Be sure to take photos of your victim’s faces when they first bite into your April Fools’ cookies.

    6- Wild Shopping

    At your local grocer, place a realistic-looking plastic snake or spider among the fresh vegetables. Now wait around the corner for the first yell.

    7- The Oldest Trick in the Book

    Don’t forget probably the oldest, yet very effective April Fools’ joke in the book - smearing hand cream or Vaseline on a door handle that most staff, family or friends are likely to use. Yuck to the max!

    8- Sneeze On Me

    Another golden oldie is also gross, yet harmless and utterly satisfying as a prank. Fill a small spray bottle that you can easily conceal with water. Walk past a friend, colleague or one of your kids, and fake a sneeze while simultaneously spraying them with a bit of water. Expect to be called a totally disgusting person. Add a drop of lovely smelling essential oil to the water for extra confusion.

    9- Word Play Repairs

    Put a fresh leek in the hand wash basin at home or work, and then tell your housemates or colleagues this: “There’s a huge leak in the restroom/bathroom basin, it’s really serious. Please can someone go have a look?!” Expect exasperation and smiles all around. Note that this prank is only likely to work where people understand English well.

    10- Scary Face

    Print out a very scary face on an A4 sheet of paper, and place it in a colleague’s, or one of your kid’s drawers, so it’s the first thing they see when they open the drawer. You may not be very popular for a while.

    11- Wake Up To Madness

    Put foamy shaving cream, or real whipped cream on your hand, and wake your kid up by tickling their nose with it. As long as they get the joke, this could be a wonderful and fun way to start April Fools’ Day.

    Computer Prank

    12- Computer Prank

    This one’s fabulous, if you have a bit of time to fiddle with a colleague, friend or your kid’s computer. It is most effective on a computer where most of the icons they use are on the desktop background itself (as opposed to on the bottom task bar).

    Take and save a screenshot of their desktop with the icons. Set this screenshot as their background image. Now delete all the working icons. When they return to their computer, wait for the curses when no amount of clicking on the icons works.

    13- Monster Under the Cup

    This one will also work well anywhere people meet. Take a paper cup, and write the following on it in black pen: “Danger! Don’t lift, big spider underneath.” Place it upside-down on prominent flat surface, such as a kitchen counter, a colleague’s desk or a restaurant table. Expect some truly interesting responses.

    Door Prank

    14- Prank Door

    Write in large letters on a large and noticeable piece of paper: PUSH. Tape this notice on a door that should be pulled to open, and watch the hilarious struggle of those clever souls who actually read signs.

    4. How Can HebrewPod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?

    If you happen to visit Israel, or if you work for any Hebrew speaking company, knowing the above Hebrew prankster phrases can really lighten up your day. Showing you have a sense of humor can go a long way to cement good relationships in any situation. These phrases are at your disposal for free, as well as are these 100 core Hebrew words, which you will learn how to pronounce perfectly.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Master A Language!

    Also, don’t stop at learning April Fools’ phrases in Hebrew - bone up your Hebrew language skills with these FREE key phrases. Yes, HebrewPod101 doesn’t joke when it comes to effective, fun and easy learning.

    Now, as a bonus, test our super-learning technology, and learn the Top 1000 most useful phrases in Hebrew below! But that’s not all. Read on to learn how you can be eligible for large enrollment discounts at HebrewPod101.

    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Hebrew - testing new technology

    Help us by being a language guinea pig! Listen to this video above with embedded cutting-edge, frequency-based learning technology that enables you to learn large amounts of data in record time.

    • Note: This technology is in beta-phase of development, and we invite your input for fine-tuning.
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    Thank you for helping HebrewPod101! We’re serious about making learning Hebrew fun.

    5 Ways to Profit from Your Mistakes While Learning Hebrew

    5 Ways to Profit from Your Mistakes While Learning Hebrew

    The fear of making mistakes is one of the biggest roadblocks to language learning. Out of all the discomforts that come with learning a foreign language nothing looms quite as daunting in the mind of a beginner.

    It’s almost as if we’re hardwired to want perfection when we speak. However the reality is that mistakes are unavoidable. I’d even go so far as to say that they’re an integral part of the learning process.

    But still we try are hardest to fight them, thinking that perhaps the key to learning rests in the flashiest method or the LiveFluent Hebrew course or HebrewPod101.

    Think of small children who are just starting to learn English. They mispronounce words. They use words incorrectly, and their grammar is usually pretty lousy. Sometimes they even make up their own words. Research and academic opinion show that this is all a natural part of the process. If making mistakes made up such a huge part of learning our native language, why do you expect it to be any different when learning a foreign one?

    In this post we’ll talk about five ways you profit from your mistakes while learning Hebrew. Because in the end mistakes shouldn’t be feared they should be welcomed. The more you make the faster you will learn.

    1) Be humble

    There’s no room for pride when you’re learning Hebrew. If you’re a beginner, native speakers will likely be very accommodating with your mistakes and slower reaction times during conversations. There’s no reason to be embarrassed. Remember that it’s a sign of respect to learn another person’s language. No one expects you to speak flawlessly right from the start. No on else with hold your mistakes against you, so make sure you don’t either.

    2) Don’t play the comparison game

    Whether it’s a native speaker or another Hebrew learner don’t make the mistake of comparing your progress to someone else’s. No doubt at the beginning there will be times when it feels like everyone is speaking perfect Hebrew while you’re left you in the dust.

    Try not to get discouraged. It’s your race to run not theirs. Everyone has their story, their own reason and method for learning Hebrew. Comparing your progress to someone else’s is like well…comparing apples and oranges.

    It’s easy to freak out when someone speaks perfectly while you’re struggling to make the most basic sentences. But don’t forget that while you can easily see someone else’s success, you’re much less likely to see the hard work that got them their. Every Hebrew speaker you meet had to learn the language at some point. Whether it was as a child or an adult they too had to wade through their mistakes before they could speak fluently.

    Get feedback on your mistakes

    3) Get feedback on your mistakes

    Anytime you write or speak Hebrew try to get feedback from someone who speaks the language. I cannot stress this enough. You can make mistakes day and night, but if you’re never corrected they do you no good. You can’t learn from a mistake if you don’t know that it’s a mistake. Many in the language learning community hold that feedback is an integral part of the language acquisition process.

    Encourage friends and language partners to correct your Hebrew anytime all the time. Worst case scenario you’ll make a mistake 100 times and get corrected 100 times. It might seem petty or frustrating, but it’s all worth it the 101st time when you finally remember your mistake and start speaking correctly.

    Some mistakes will be easy to amend and you’ll adjust your Hebrew right away. Others might take awhile. Speaking a foreign language is a lot like juggling. There are a lot of moving pieces you have to keep in place. Whether it’s pronunciation, grammar, or vocabulary getting feedback on your effort will help refine your Hebrew until you feel comfortable in the language.

    Listen to your brain

    4) Listen to your brain

    After all the practice and feedback, eventually you’ll start to notice that certain Hebrew words come to mind quicker than you have the chance to think about them. Instead of having to scan your brain for the latest “Hebrew word file”, you sort of instinctively come up with a word for a given sentence.

    Don’t hesitate to blurt this word out. Sometimes it will be completely wrong. Other times it will be dead on. When words start coming to mind instinctively that means your brain is starting to get more and more used to using Hebrew. The incorrect words (I like to call them brain farts), are sort of like growing pains. You’ll have them for a little while but over time you’ll see them less and less until all of your instinctual words are correct (this is essentially fluency).

    So don’t let the fear of making a mistake short circuit your brain’s natural learning process. Go with whatever word your brain gives you!

    5) Never take the easy way out

    If there are two ways to say what you want to say in Hebrew, one you know and are comfortable with, and the other you’re not sure off….use the one you’re least comfortable with. Purposely choose subjects and sentence constructions that are difficult for you. Don’t get complacent and fall into the trap of using the same phrase over and over again, or having the same type of conversation with a language partner.

    You always want to push the boundaries. Think of it as lifting weights. If you only ever lift 20 lbs for 20 reps, you’re not likely to get stronger after a certain point. Eventually you have to increase the weight. When you do it’ll burn and it won’t be comfortable, but overtime your body will adapt and you will become stronger.

    It’s the same with languages. Except in this case your brain is the muscle and the weights are the difficulty of the language.

    6) Enjoy the language for its own sake

    Small children not only make a ton of mistakes when they learn to speak, they also have a ton of fun. To them life and language are both one giant mysterious adventure. They aren’t worried about making progress, impressing people, or speaking perfectly.

    Take a note from their playbook. Enjoy Hebrew as you learn it. Let your focus be on the beauty and magic of the language. Savor the times you get to use it. If you loosen up and enjoy the ride you will learn much faster.

    Final thoughts

    Mistakes are a powerful and indispensable part of learning a language. I hope this post inspired you to stop being afraid of them and start embracing them. This subtle change in outlook could mean the world to your Hebrew learning!