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Hebrew Verbs List: 100 Must-Know Hebrew Verbs

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Have you seen HebrewPod101’s lessons on 100 Nouns and 100 Adjectives? Today, we’re going to take a look at the top 100 Hebrew verbs! Today’s lesson will both offer you an introduction to the unique grammar of Hebrew verb conjugation, as well as help you to arm your language toolkit with essential verbs.

Verbs are simply a necessity, moreso perhaps in Hebrew than in any other language. In fact, many sentences and questions in Hebrew are actually nothing more than conjugated verbs, so it’s not uncommon to hear one-word sentences and questions.

In this article, we’ll cover the basics of Modern Hebrew verbs, which, it should be noted, differ significantly from verb usage in the Bible. We’ll look at the ways a verb’s declension changes depending on what relationship we want to form between it and the agent and/or object of our sentence. And we’ll get a nice, useful list of the most common Hebrew verbs along the way!

For the purpose of getting a solid grasp on the verb patterns, we’ll look at conjugation in the past tense only, using third-person singular masculine to keep things simple. Once you’ve mastered the past tense, it will be easy enough to build the present and future tenses on that foundation and to apply grammatical gender and number. 

Remember that this is one aspect of Hebrew you can breathe easy about. In most language applications, we essentially only use three tenses: simple past, simple present, and simple future.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Useful Verbs in Hebrew Table of Contents
  1. Introduction to the Binyanim, or Hebrew Verb Conjugation Patterns
  2. Paal Verbs
  3. Piel Verbs
  4. Hif’il Verbs
  5. Huf’al Verbs
  6. Pual Verbs
  7. Nifal Verbs
  8. Hitpael Verbs
  9. Conclusion: Verbs are where the action’s at!

1. Introduction to the Binyanim, or Hebrew Verb Conjugation Patterns

Similar to other languages, the Hebrew verb system uses patterns to help us conjugate verbs. Luckily for Hebrew language learners, these patterns are pretty strictly followed, with few exceptions. Also to your advantage as a student of Hebrew is the fact that there’s a logical division of verbs into these different conjugation patterns. In fact, the conjugation pattern tells us the verb’s function. For example, it tells us if it’s an active verb, a passive verb, or a reflexive verb.

Roots of a Tree

Additionally, remember that the entire Hebrew language is built on the shoresh, or “root” system. So we’ll see that most verbs will be represented in different conjugation patterns that will use the meaning of the root word in different relationships. Hebrew verb roots will, for example, indicate if the verb represents doing something to something or someone else, doing something to ourselves, or having something done to us, etc. 

Here are the different Hebrew verb categories according to their conjugation patterns:

HEBREW ACTIVE VERBS

• פעל

Pa’al

• פיעל

Piel

• הפעיל

Hif’il

HEBREW PASSIVE VERBS

• הופעל

Huf’al

• פועל

Pual

• נפעל

 Nif’al

HEBREW REFLEXIVE VERBS

• התפעל

Hitpael

2. Paal Verbs

Top Verbs

To make more sense of the Hebrew verb types, let’s start by taking a look at the root פ״ע״ל (peh-ayin-lamed). This word always has something to do with action, and its various conjugations are not only verbs unto themselves, they’re also the names for the other verbs in Hebrew that follow the same pattern. For example, פעל (paal) means “worked” or “performed,” but it’s also the name for the category of verbs that follow the same pattern, with the vowels קמץ (kamatz) and then פתח (patakh), both of which sound like the “a” in the word “father.” These verbs are general action verbs. 

Here’s a list of paal verbs with example sentences:

  • אמר

Amar

“Said”

דוד אמר שלום לחברים שלו.

David amar shalom la-khaverim shelo.

“David said hello to his friends.”

  • שאל

Sha’al

“Asked”

הוא שאל אותי איפה התחנה המרכזית.

Hu shaal oti eyfoh hatakhanah hamerkazit.

“He asked me where the central bus station is.”

  • כתב

Katav

“Wrote”

הוא כתב לי מכתב באנגלית.

Hu katav li mikhtav be-Anglit.

“He wrote me a letter in English.”

  • בנה

Banah

“Built”

אבא בנה בית מעץ.

Aba banah bayit me-etz.

“Father built a wooden house.”

  • גמר

Gamar

“Finished”

הוא גמר את שיעורי הבית שלו מיד אחרי שחזר הביתה.

Hu gamar et shiurey habayit shelo miyad akharey shekhazar habaytah.

“He finished his homework right after he got home.”

  • שלח

Shalakh

“Sent”

בועז שלח לי מייל לגבי העסקה.

Boaz shalakh li meyl legabey ha-iskah.

“Boaz sent me an email about the deal.”

  • סגר

Sagar

“Closed”

הוא סגר את הדלת מאחוריו.

Hu sagar et ha-delet me’akhorav.

“He closed the door behind him.”

  • ראה

Raah

“Saw”

משה ראה את השמיים האפורים ולבש מעיל גשם.

Mosheh raah et hashamayim haaforim velavash meil.

“Moshe saw the gray sky and put on a coat.”

  • חשב

Chashav

“Thought”

הוא חשב על הבחורה הכי יפה בכיתה והסמיק.

Hu khashav al habakhurah hakhi yafah bakitah vehismik.

“He thought about the prettiest girl in the class and blushed.”

  • זכר

Zakhar

“Remembered”

הוא לא זכר את שמו של האיש הזקן.

Hu lo zakhar et shmo shel ha-ish ha-zaken.

“He didn’t remember the old man’s name.”

  • בחר

Bakhar

“Chose”

רם בחר את הגלידה בטעם וניל.

Ram bakhar et ha-glidah be-ta’am vanil.

“Ram chose the vanilla-flavored ice cream.”

  • שמע

Shama

“Heard”

הוא לא שמע את השעון המעורר שלו.

Hu lo shama et ha-shaon ha-meorer shelo.

“He didn’t hear his alarm clock.”

  • חלם

Khalam

“Dreamt”

דניאל חלם על אי יפה באוקיינוס השקט.

Daniel khalam al ee yafeh ba-okiyanus ha-shaket.

“Daniel dreamt of a beautiful island in the Pacific Ocean.”

  • שמר

Shamar

“Kept” / “Guarded” / “Put away”

אריק שמר את השאריות במקרר.

Arik shamar et ha-she’eriyot ba-mekarer.

“Arik put away the leftovers in the refrigerator.” 

  • מכר

Makhar

“Sold”

סבא שלי מכר את האוטו הישן שלו.

Saba sheli makhar et ha-oto ha-yashan shelo.

“My grandfather sold his old car.”

3. Piel Verbs 

More Essential Verbs

Similar to paal verbs, piel verbs also describe general action verbs and don’t necessarily involve or mention the object of the action being described. They simply follow a different conjugation pattern, which we must learn by practicing. Note that the vowels here are חיריק (khirik) and צירי (tzeyrey), equivalent to the “ee” in “tree” and the “ay” in “tray,” respectively. 

The following is a list of essential Hebrew verbs that fall under the piel category, along with example sentences.

  • נישק

Nishek

“Kissed”

אבא נישק את אמא לכבוד שבת.

Aba nishek et ima likhvod Shabat.

“Father kissed mother for the Sabbath.”

  • שילם

Shilem

“Paid”

הבחור הנדיב שילם על ההזמנות של כולם.

Ha-bakhur ha-nadiv shilem al ha-hazmanot shel kulam.

“The generous fellow paid for everyone’s orders.”

  • מילא

Mile

“Filled (out)”

השוטר מילא את הדו״ח עם פרטי התאונה.

Ha-shoter mila et haduakh im pirtey ha-teunah.

“The police officer filled out the report with the details of the accident.”

  • דיבר

Diber

“Spoke”

הילד דיבר בקול חזק מאוד.

Ha-yeled diber bekol khazak meod.

“The boy spoke in a very loud voice.” 

  • לימד

Limed

“Taught”

אבא שלי לימד אותי לנהוג.

Aba sheli limed oti linhog.

“My father taught me to drive.”

  • טאטא

Tita

“Swept”

העובד טאטא את הרצפה בחנות.

Ha-oved tita et ha-ritzpah ba-khanut.

“The employee swept the floor in the store.” 

  • ביטל

Bitel

“Canceled”

ראש הממשלה ביטל את הנסיעה שלו לחו״ל.

Rosh ha-memshalah bitel et ha-nesiah shelo le-khu”l.

“The prime minister canceled his visit abroad.”

  • חיבר

Khiber

“Connected”

הטכנאי חיבר לי אינטרנט בדירה.

Ha-tekhnay khiber li internet ba-dirah.

“The technician connected the internet in my apartment.”

  • סיפר

Siper

“Told”

החייל סיפר לנו על המבצע המסוכן.

Ha-khayal siper lanu al ha-mivtza ha-mesukan.

“The soldier told us about the dangerous mission.”

  • מיהר

Miher

“Rushed”

השחקן מיהר לתפוס את הכדור.

Ha-sakhkan miher litfos et ha-kadur.

“The player rushed after the ball.”

  • לכלך

Likhlekh

“Dirtied”

הילד ליכלך את המכנסיים שלו בבוץ.

Ha-yeled likhlekh et ha-mikhnasayim shelo ba-botz.

“The boy dirtied his pants in the mud.”

  • חייך

Khiyekh

“Smiled”

הוא חייך לי מבעד לחלון.

Hu khiyekh li mibead lakhalon.

“He smiled at me through the window.”

  • טייל

Tiyel

“Traveled”

שלמה טייל שנה בהודו אחרי הצבא.

Shlomoh tiyel shanah be-Hodu akharey ha-tzava.

“Shlomo traveled for a year in India after the army.”

  • ניצח

Nitzeach

“Won”

הצבא ניצח במלחמה מול האויב.

Ha-tzava nitzeakh ba-milkhamah mul haoyev.

“The army won the war against the enemy.”

  • סימן

Simen

“Marked” / “Highlighted / “Mentioned”

המורה סימן את הדוגמה במאמר.

Hamoreh simen et hadugmag bamaamar.

“The teacher marked the example in the article.”

4. Hif’il Verbs

Hand Turning on Light

Hebrew Hif’il verbs are also action verbs, but these specifically describe something done to something or someone, like a transitive verb in English with an object. For example, in the case of הפעיל (Hif’il), the name of this verb conjugation pattern, the verb of the same name means “to operate something or someone.”

These are very handy verbs to know as they will help us describe all sorts of interactions in day-to-day life. Note that they mostly use the vowel חיריק (khirik) twice, equivalent to the “ee” in “tree,” though some also use צירי (tzeyrey) and חיריק (khirik), equivalent to the “ay” in “tray” and the “ee” in “tree,” respectively. 

The following is a list of some of the most common Hif’il verbs, along with example sentences.

  • הפעיל

Hif’il

“Activated” / “Turned on”

הנהג הפעיל את המזגן באוטובוס.

Hanahag Hif’il et hamazgan baotobus.

“The driver turned on the air conditioner on the bus.”

  • השמיע

Hishmia

“Sounded” / “Played (audio)”

הוא השמיע לי דיסק של מוזיקה קלאסית.

Hu hishmia li disk shel muzikah klasit.

“He played me a CD of classical music.”

  • הכניס

Hikhnis

“Put in” / “Brought in” / “Ushered in”

המנהל הכניס אותנו למשרד שלו לשיחה רצינית.

Hamenahel hikhnis otanu lamisrad shelo lesikhah retzinit.

“The manager ushered us into his office for a serious conversation.”

  • הציע

Hetzia

“Offered” / “Suggested”

אבא הציע לי עבודה אצלו במשרד אחרי האוניברסיטה.

Aba hetzia li avodah etzlo bamisrad akharey hauniversitah.

“Dad offered me a job in his office after university.”

  • הפריע

Hifria

“Bothered”

הכלב של השכנים הפריע לי לישון כל הלילה.

Hakelev shel hashkhenim hifria li lishon kol halaylah.

“The neighbors’ dog bothered me all night as I tried to sleep.”

  • הביא

Hevi

“Brought”

אח שלי הביא לנו מתנות מפריז.

Akh sheli hevi lanu matanot mePariz.

“My brother brought us presents from Paris.”

  • הכין

Hekhin

“Prepared”

מוחמד הכין לנו חומוס ממש טעים.

Mukhamad hekhin lanu khumus mamash taim.

“Muhammad prepared some really tasty hummus for us.”

  • הציל

Hitzil

“Saved” / “Rescued”

המעיל הזה ממש הציל אותי מהקור היום.

Hameil hazeh mamash hitzil oti mehakor hayom.

“This coat really saved me from the cold today.”

  • הבין

Hevin

“Understood”

התייר לא הבין אותנו בכלל.

Hatayar lo hevin otanu bikhlal.

“The tourist didn’t understand us at all.”

  • הביט

Hebit

“Looked”

האיש הביט בנוף וחייך.

Haish hebit banof vekhiyekh.

“The man looked at the view and smiled.”

  • הזכיר

Hizkir

“Reminded”

שמואל הזכיר לנו לקחת קרם הגנה.

Shmuel hizkir lanu lakakhat krem haganah.

“Shmuel reminded us to take sunscreen.”

  • הבטיח

Hivtiakh

“Promised”

זוהר הבטיח לי לשמור על הכלב בסוף השבוע.

Zohar hivtiakh li lishmor al hakelev besof hashavua.

“Zohar promised to watch my dog this weekend.”

  • הזמין

Hizmin

“Ordered” / “Invited”

חבר שלי הזמין אותי לקונצרט ביום שני.

Khaver sheli hizmin oti le-kontzert be-yom sheni.

“My friend invited me to a concert on Monday.”

  • החזיר

Hekhzir

“Returned” / “Brought back”

נהג המונית החזיר אותי הביתה מתחנת הרכבת.

nahag ha-monit hekhzir oti ha-baytah metakhanat ha-rakevet.

“The taxi driver brought me back home from the train station.”

  • החביא

Hekhbi

“Hid”

הקוסם החביא את הקלף בשרוול שלו.

Hakosem hekhbi et haklaf basharvul shelo.

“The magician hid the card up his sleeve.”

5. Huf’al Verbs 

Negative Verbs

Huf’al verbs can be thought of as the passive or past participle of Hif’il verbs. In other words, we’re thinking of the same meaning of the shoresh and the same interaction, just described from the perspective of the object and not the agent. 

To this end, in our examples we’ll look at the Huf’al form of some of the same Hif’il verbs we just saw above. Note that these verbs use the vowels שורוק (shuruk) or קובוץ (kubutz), and then פתח (patakh), like “oo” in “cool” and “a” in “father,” respectively.

  • הופעל

Huf’al

“Was operated” / “Was activated”

השעון המעורר הופעל לשש בבוקר.

Hashaon hameorer Huf’al leshes baboker.

“The alarm clock was activated for six in the morning.”

  • הושמע

Hushma

“Was played” / “Was heard” / “Was sounded”

השיר היפה הושמע ברדיו.

Hashir hayafeh hushma baradiyo.

“The pretty song was played on the radio.”

  • הוכנס

Hukhnas

“Was brought in” / “Was put in”

התלמיד החדש הוכנס למשרד המנהל.

Hatalmid hakhadash hukhnas lemisrad hamenahel.

“The new student was brought in to the principal’s office.”

  • הוצע

Hutza

“Was proposed” / “Was suggested”

הרעיון הוצע על ידי איש צוות מירושלים.

Haraayon hutza al yedey ish tzevet meYerushalayim.

“The idea was proposed by a staff member from Jerusalem.”

  • הובא

Huva

“Was brought”

החומר לבניין הובא לאתר במשאית.

Hakhomer lebinyan huva laatar bemasait.

“The building material was brought to the site by truck.”

  • הוצל

Hutzal

“Was saved” / “Was rescued”

הילד הוצל מהזרם על ידי המציל.

Hayeled hutzal mehazerem al yedey hametzil.

“The boy was rescued from the current by the lifeguard.”

  • הובטח

Huvtakh

“Was promised” / “Was guaranteed”

המקום שלי במשרד הובטח על ידי הבוסית.

Hamakom sheli bamisrad huvtakh al yedey habosit.

“My position in the office was guaranteed by the boss.”

  • הוחזר

Hukhzar

“Was returned” / “Was brought back”

הכלב שלי הוחזר הביתה על ידי שכן שהכיר אותו ברחוב.

Hakelev sheli hukhzar habaytah al yedey shakhen shehekir oto barekhov.

“My dog was brought back home by a neighbor who recognized him in the street.”

  • הוקם

Hukam

“Was established” / “Was founded” / “Was erected”

התיאטרון הוקם לפני יותר ממאה שנה.

Hateatron hukam lifney yoter memeah shanah.

“The theater was founded more than 100 years ago.”

  • הומלץ

Humlatz

“Was recommended” / “Was suggested”

בית הקפה הזה הומלץ לי על ידי ידידה.

Beyt hakafeh hazeh humlatz li al yedey yedidah.

“This café was recommended to me by a friend.”

  • הופסק

Hufsak

“Was stopped” / “Was turned off” / “Was disconnected”

שירות האינטרנט הופסק בגלל אי תשלום.

Sheyrut hainternet hufsak biglal iy tashlum.

“The internet service was disconnected for failure to pay.”

  • הוצב

Hutzav

“Was placed” / “Was set up”

הבסיס הוצב קרוב לגבול.

Habasis hutzav karov lagvul.

“The base was set up near the border.”

  • הושג

Husag

“Was achieved”

השלום עם מצרים הושג על ידי מנחם בגין.

Hashalom im Mitzrayim husag al yedey Menakhem Begin.

“Peace with Egypt was achieved by Menachem Begin.”

  • הועבר

Huavar

“Was transferred”

המכתב שלך הועבר ישר למנהל.

Hamikhtav shelkha huavar yashar lamenahel.

“Your letter was transferred directly to the manager.”

  • הושם

Husam

“Was applied”

למה מחייבים אותי עוד פעם אם המס כבר הושם?

Lamah mekhayvim oti od paam im hamas kvar husam?

“Why are you charging me again if the tax was already applied?”

6. Pual Verbs

Car being Pushed by Man

Pual verbs can be thought of as the past participle of piel verbs. So once again, we’re thinking of the same meaning of the shoresh and the same interaction, but described from the perspective of the object. Again, in our examples, we’ll look at the pual form of some of the same piel verbs we looked at earlier. 

Note that these verbs use the vowels שורוק (shuruk) or קובוץ (kubutz), and then פתח (patakh), like “oo” in “cool” and “a” in “father,” respectively.

  • שולם

Shulam

“Was paid”

החשבון שולם מראש.

Hakheshbon shulam merosh.

“The bill was paid in advance.”

  • בוטל

Butal

“Was canceled”

הקונצרט בוטל בשל מזג האוויר.

Hakontzert butal beshel mezeg haavir.

“The concert was canceled due to the weather.”

  • חובר

Khubar

“Was connected”

החשמל חובר לפני שבוע.

Hakheshmal khubar lifney shavua.

“The electricity was connected a week ago.”

  • סופר

Supar

“Was told”

הסיפור המפורסם הזה סופר בספר הזכרונות של סבא שלי.

Hasipur hamefursam hazeh supar besefer hazikhronot she saba sheli.

“That famous story was told in my grandfather’s memoirs.”

  • גודל

Gudal

“Was raised” / “Was cultivated”

במקור הפלפל גודל במקסיקו.

Bamakor hapilpel gudal beMeksiko.

“Originally, pepper was cultivated in Mexico.”

  • דובר

Dubar

“Was spoken”

היידיש דובר על ידי יהודי אירופה לפני מלחמת העולם השנייה.

Hayidish dubar al yedey yehudey Eyropah lifney Milkhemet Haolam Hashniyah.

“Yiddish was spoken by European Jews before World War II.”

  • יושב

Yushav

“Was settled”

הגליל יושב בעיקר על ידי חקלאים.

HaGalil yushav beikar al yedey khaklaim.

“The Galil was settled mostly by farmers.”

  • כונה

Kunah

“Was called” / “Was nicknamed”

דוד בן ישי כונה גם דוד המלך.

David ben Yishay kunah gam David Hamelekh.

“David son of Jesse was also called King David.”

  • טופל

Tupal

“Was handled” / “Was treated”

התיק שלך כבר טופל.

Ha-tik shelkha kvar tupal.

“Your case was already handled.”

  • זומן

Zuman

“Was invited”

יעקב זומן להשתתף בחידון התנ״ך.

Yaakov zuman lehishtatef beKhidon Hatana”kh.

“Yaakov was invited to take part in the Bible Contest.”

7. Nifal Verbs

Nifal verbs are a bit trickier to describe because they’re used in a diverse set of circumstances. Like Huf’al and Pual verbs, they can sometimes be passive; however, they can sometimes also be active or even be used in situations where they’re something akin to the progressive tense in English. 

We can make more sense of this by seeing some examples. Note that these verbs use different vowel combinations in addition to the חיריק (khirik) and פתח (patakh), like “ee” in “tree” and “a” in “father,” respectively, of the category name נפעל (nifal).

  • נכנס

Nikhnas

“Came in” / “Went in”

הרופא נכנס לבית החולים להתחיל את המשמרת שלו.

Harofe nikhnas leveyt hakholim lehatkhil et hamishmeret shelo.

“The doctor went in to the hospital to start his shift.”

  • נודע

Noda

“Made aware of” / “Became known”

מתי נודע לך על מות השכן?

Matay noda lekha al mot hashakhen?

“When were you made aware of your neighbor’s death?”

  • נראה

Nir’eh

“Look” / “Appear”

אני נראה טוב עם עניבה?

Ani nireh tov im anivah?

“Do I look good in a tie?”

  • נשמע

Nishma

“Sound”

נשמע לך כמו רעיון טוב?

Nishma lekha kemo raayon tov?

“Does that sound like a good idea to you?”

  • נרדם

Nirdam

“Fall asleep”

הכלב שלי תמיד נרדם ליד הכיסא שלי.

Ha-kelev sheli tamid nirdam leyad ha-kise sheli.

“My dog always falls asleep beside my chair.”

  • נמצא

Nimtza

“Is found” / “Is encountered” / “Is located”

איפה נמצא הקניון, בבקשה?

Eyfoh nimtza ha-kanyon be-vakasha?

“Where is the mall located, please?”

  • נמשך

Nimshakh

“Continue” / “Last”

הגשם נמשך כל היום.

Ha-geshem nimshakh kol ha-yom.

“The rain lasted all day.”

  • נשאר

Nish’ar

“Remain” / “Stay”

למה אתה לא נשאר אצלי בדירה?

Lamah atah lo nishar etzli badirah?

“Why don’t you stay at my apartment?”

  • נגמר

Nigmar

“Finish” / “Be over”

הסרט כבר נגמר?

Ha-seret kvar nigmar?

Is the movie already over?”

  • נעצר

Ne’etzar

“Stop” / “Get arrested”

פתאום השעון שלי נעצר!

Pitom hashaon sheli neetzar!

“My watch suddenly stopped!”

  • נסתר

Nistar

“Hidden”

מה שנסתר בלב הוא תמיד מסתורין.

Mah shenistar balev hu tamid mistorin.

“What’s hidden in the heart is always a mystery.”

  • נלווה

Nilveh

“Accompany”

אני מחפש אביזר נלווה לתיק הזה.

Ani mekhapes avizar nilveh latik hazeh.

“I am looking for an accessory to accompany this bag.”

  • נזכר

Nizkar

“Mentioned”

זה אותו המקום הנזכר בתנ״ך.

Zeh oto hamakom hanizkar baTana”kh.

“This is the same place that is mentioned in the Bible.”

  • נשלח

Nishlakh

“Sent”

המסרון שלך נשלח בהצלחה.

Ha-misron shelkha nishlakh be-hatzlakhah.

“Your message was sent successfully.”

  • נקרא

Nikra

“Called”

המקום הזה נקרא עמק השלום.

Ha-makom hazeh nikra Emek Hashalom.

“This place is called The Valley of Peace.”

8. Hitpael Verbs

Woman Putting on Lipstick

Hitpael verbs are definitely one of the coolest features of Hebrew. This is the reflexive form of a verb, meaning it describes something that an agent does to him- or itself. This form is used very commonly in Hebrew. 

Note that it uses three vowels: חיריק (khirik), like “ee” in “tree,” פתח (patakh), like “a” in “father,” and צירי (tseyrey), like “ay” in “tray.”

  • התקרר

Hitkarer

“Got cold”

האוכל שלך התקרר.

Ha-okhel shelkha hitkarer.

“Your food got cold.”

  • התחמם

Hitkhamem

“Got warm”

הוא התחמם מול האח.

Hu hitkhamem mul ha-akh.

“He got warm in front of the fireplace.”

  • הסתכל

Histakel

“Looked at”

הוא הסתכל על כל התמונות אבל זיהה את גנב.

Hu histakel al kol ha-tmunot aval lo zihah et ha-ganav.

“He looked at all the pictures, but didn’t recognize the thief.”

  • הסתובב

Histovev

“Turned around”

הוא הסתובב וראה שמישהו עוקב אחריו.

Hu histovev ve-ra’ah she-mishehu okev akharav.

“He turned around and saw that someone was following him.”

  • הסתדר

Histader

“Worked out” / “Came together”

הכל הסתדר לי אחרי שסיימתי את הצבא.

Hakol histader li keshe-siyamti et ha-tzava.

“Everything worked out for me after I finished the army.”

  • הסתבך

Histabekh

“Got into a bind” / “Had trouble”

הוא הסתבך בכבישים עם ההנחיות הבלתי ברורות.

Hu histabekh ba-kvishim im ha-hankhayot ha-bilti brurot.

“He had trouble on the road with the unclear directions.”

  • הצטער

Hitztaer

Regretted

מיכאל הצטער על זה שהוא צעק על חברה שלו.

Mikhael hitztaer al zeh shehu tza’ak al khaverah shelo.

“Michael regretted having yelled at his girlfriend.”

  • השתדל

Hishtadel

“Made an effort”

אבא שלי תמיד השתדל לעזור לי בלימודים.

Aba sheli tamid hishtadel la’azor li ba-limudim.

“My father has always made an effort to help me with schoolwork.”

  • התחבר

Hitkhaber

“Connected to”

הפלאפון שלי לא התחבר לאינטרנט משום מה.

Ha-pelefon sheli lo hitkhaber la-internet mishum mah.

“My cell phone didn’t connect to the internet for some reason.”

  • השתנה

Hishtanah

“Changed”

הכפר שלי לא השתנה כבר עשרים שנה.

Ha-kfar sheli lo hishtanah kvar esrim shanah.

“My village hasn’t changed in twenty years.”

  • השתמש

Hishtamesh

“Used”

הקצין השתמש במשקפת כדי לסרוק את הסביבה.

Ha-katzin hishtamesh ba-mishkefet kedey lisrok et ha-svivah.

“The officer used the binoculars to sweep the surroundings.”

  • השתתף

Hishtatef

“Participated”

זה הזמר שהשתתף בתוכנית הטלוויזיה.

Zeh ha-zamar she-hishtatef be-tokhnit ha-televiziyah.

“That’s the singer who participated in the TV show.”

  • התבלבל

Hitbalbel

“Got confused”

הנהג התבלבל במחלף ופנה ימינה במקום שמאלה.

Ha-nahag hitbalbel ba-makhlef ve-panah yeminah bimkom smolah.

“The driver got confused at the intersection and turned right instead of left.”

  • התגעגע

Hitga’agea

“Missed”

היפני התגעגע לסושי אמיתי כמו בבית.

Ha-Yapani hitga’agea lesushi amiti kemo ba-bayit.

“The Japanese missed real sushi like back home.”

  • התעורר

Hitorer

“Woke up”

הספורטאי תמיד התעורר לאימון בוקר מוקדם.

Ha-sportai tamid hit’orer le-imun boker mukdam.

“The athlete always woke up for an early morning workout.”

9. Conclusion: Verbs are where the action’s at!

I hope you’ve had fun learning the top 100 Hebrew verbs today. As you can see, Hebrew verbs are a huge topic, so it’s best to take it a portion at a time. For example, you could start by tackling just one binyan or, if you’re a bit more courageous, possibly studying all the active verb forms first, then moving on to the passive ones later. In any case, don’t stress about trying to dominate all of these all at once!

Remember that HebrewPod101 is here to help you grow your Hebrew skills at your own pace. Use this lesson as an introductory guide, and then delve deeper into the topics you wish to study more.

And take comfort in the fact that if you start recognizing the roots in a verb, as well as the conjugation patterns, you can actually start understanding verbs even if you’ve never seen them before, just by recognizing the root letters and the relationship the vowels indicate!

Have fun, and let us know if you’re still a bit unsure about any of the topics we discussed today, or if we left something out about Hebrew verbs that you would really like to know. Also keep an eye out for our upcoming article on how to conjugate Hebrew verbs, where we’ll further discuss how this works.

Shalom!

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The Only Hebrew Pronouns List You’ll Ever Need

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Hebrew pronouns, just like those in English, are one of the seven parts of speech in Hebrew. It goes without saying that knowing the Hebrew pronouns is essential in being able to speak the language with comfort and ease. Even if you’re unsure of what a pronoun is, you can be sure that you use pronouns all the time. 

Pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. Often, though not always, they’re used in order to avoid the awkward repetition of proper nouns. So, every time you say “I,” you’re using a pronoun. And when you ask, “What is that?” you’ve just used two pronouns! So you can see that pronouns are a very basic and common language element, and one it’s wise to master.

Hebrew pronouns fall into four basic categories: personal pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, interrogative pronouns, and indefinite pronouns. Don’t get scared off by these fancy names, though! It’s really quite simple. 

Personal and demonstrative pronouns represent a specific person or thing, and indefinite pronouns are used for non-specific nouns. All of these pronouns have gender and are countable. Interrogative pronouns, on the other hand, are simply pronouns used in asking questions. These include “who,” “what,” “when,” and “where.” 

In this lesson, we’re going to break things down and look at a nice Hebrew pronouns list so you have all the knowledge you’ll need to speak and understand Hebrew pronouns in context. Here we go!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Hebrew Table of Contents
  1. Hebrew Personal Pronouns
  2. Hebrew Demonstrative Pronouns
  3. Hebrew Interrogative Pronouns
  4. Hebrew Indefinite Pronouns
  5. Conclusion: Master Hebrew the Fun Way with HebrewPod101.com!

1. Hebrew Personal Pronouns

People Forming an Arrow

Let’s begin with the most common Hebrew pronouns first: the personal pronouns. As you may have guessed from their name, these pronouns describe people (although in some cases, we also use them for animals as well). Remember that Hebrew uses different grammar for masculine and feminine, and this is true for pronouns as well. 

So as you’re learning these, make sure to pay attention to the fact that a feminine pronoun will be used to substitute, not surprisingly, a female; it will also go along with feminine verbs and adjectives. The same, of course, is true in terms of masculine pronouns for males, along with masculine verbs and adjectives.

Also note that we want to be careful to ensure we have number agreement. This means that if our pronoun is plural, our verbs and adjectives must be as well. 

The following section will also include the Hebrew possessive pronouns, the reflexive forms, and the subject/object forms. Now, let’s take a closer look at personal pronouns in Hebrew.

1- Hebrew Singular Pronouns

Different Faces

1st Person Singular

1. Subject
  • אני
    Ani
    “I”

Note that this pronoun is the same for male and female speakers. However, the verbs and adjectives we use with it must conform to the correct gender. Here are some examples:

אני נוסע היום לירושלים.
Ani nose’a hayom le-Yerushalayim.
“I am going to Jerusalem today.” [male speaker]

אני נוסעת היום לירושלים.
Ani nosa’at hayom le-Yerushalayim.
“I am going to Jerusalem today.” [female speaker]

2. Object
  • אותי
    Oti
    “Me”

אתה שומע אותי?
Ata shome’a oti?
“Do you hear me?”

3. Possessive
  • שלי
    Sheli
    “My” / “Mine”

זה הכלב שלי, ליל.
Zeh ha-kelev sheli, Layil.
“This is my dog, Layil.”

הכלב הזה שלי.
Ha-kelev hazeh sheli.”
“This dog is mine.”

4. Reflexive
  • עצמי
    Atzmi
    “Myself”

אני סגור על עצמי שאני צודק.
Ani sagur al atzmi she-ani tzodek.
“I am sure of myself that I am right.”

2nd Person Singular – Male

1. Subject
  • אתה
    Ata
    “You”

אתה חכם.
Ata chakham.
“You are smart.”

2. Object
  • אוֹתְךָ
    Otkha
    “You”

אני מכיר אותך.
Ani makir otkha.
“I know you.”

3. Possessive
  • שֶׁלְךָ
    Shelkha
    “Your(s)”

הנה הקפה שלך.
Hine ha-kafeh shelkha.
“Here is your coffee.”

הקפה הזה שלך.
Ha-kafeh hazeh shelkha.
“This coffee is yours.”

4. Reflexive
  • עַצְמְךָ
    Atzmekha
    “Yourself”

איפה אתה רואה את עצמך בעוד 10 שנים?
Eifoh atah ro’eh et atzmekha be’od eser shanim?
“Where do you see yourself in ten years?”

2nd Person Singular – Female

Introducing Yourself
1. Subject
  • את
    At
    “You”

את חכמה.
At chakhama.
“You are smart.”

2. Object
  • אוֹתָךְ
    Otakh
    “You”

אני מכיר אותך.
Ani makir otakh.
“I know you.”

3. Possessive
  • שֶׁלָּךְ
    Shelakh
    “Your(s)”

הנה הקפה שלך.
Hine ha-kafeh shelakh.
“Here is your coffee.”

הקפה הזה שלך.
Hakafeh hazeh shelakh.
“Yourself”

4. Reflexive
  • עַצְמֵךְ
    Atzmekh
    “Yourself”

איפה את רואה את עצמך בעוד 10 שנים?
Eifoh at roah et atzmekh be’od eser shanim?
“Where do you see yourself in ten years?”

3rd Person Singular – Male

1. Subject
  • הוא
    Hu
    “He”

הוא אח שלי, יונתן.
Hu ach sheli, Yonatan.
“He is my brother, Jonathan.”

2. Object
  • אותו
    Oto
    “Him”

אתה רואה אותו שם?
Ata roeh oto sham?
“Do you see him there?”

3. Possessive
  • שלו
    Shelo
    “His” / “Its”

זה העיתון שלו.
Zeh ha-iton shelo.
“This is his newspaper.”

העיתון הזה שלו. השם שלו הארץ.
Ha-iton hazeh shelo.
“This newspaper is his. Its name is Haaretz.”

4. Reflexive
  • עצמו
    Atzmo
    “Himself”

מה הוא חושב על עצמו?
Mah hu choshev al atzmo?
“What does he think of himself?”

3rd Person Singular – Female

1. Subject
  • היא
    Hi
    “She”

היא אחות שלי, מירב.
Hi achot sheli, Meirav.
“She is my sister, Merav.”

2. Object
  • אותה
    Ota
    “Her”

אתה רואה אותה שם?
Atah roeh ota sham?
“Do you see her there?”

3. Possessive
  • שלה
    Shelah
    “Her” / “Hers”

זה העיתון שלה.
Zeh ha-iton shelah.
“This is his newspaper.”

העיתון הזה שלה.
Ha-iton hazeh shelah.
“This newspaper is his.”

4. Reflexive
  • עצמה
    Atzmah
    “Herself”

מה היא חושבת על עצמה?
Mah hi choshevet al atzmah?
“What does she think of herself?”

2- Hebrew Plural Pronouns

Groups of People

1st Person Plural

1. Subject
  • אנחנו
    Anachnu
    “We”

Note that this pronoun is the same for male and female speakers. However, the verbs and adjectives we use with it must conform to the correct gender. Here are some examples:

אנחנו משחקים כדורגל היום בצהריים.
Anachnu mesachakim kaduregel hayom ba-tzohorayim.
“We are going to play soccer today in the afternoon.” (male or mixed gender speakers)

אנחנו משחקות כדורגל היום בצהריים.
Anachnu mesachakot kaduregel hayom ba-tzohorayim.
“We are going to play soccer today in the afternoon.” (female speakers)

2. Object
  • אותנו
    Otanu
    “Us”

תוכל לקחת אותנו לתחנת הרכבת?
Tukhal lakachat otanu le-tachanat ha-rakevet?
“Can you take us to the train station?”

3. Possessive
  • שלנו
    Shelanu
    “Our” / “Ours”

הגיע האוטובוס שלנו.
Higia ha-otobus shelanu.
“Our bus has arrived.”

זה האוטובוס שלנו.
Ze ha-otobus shelanu.
“This bus is ours.”

4. Reflexive
  • עצמנו
    Atzmenu
    “Ourselves”

נצטרך לעזור לעצמנו!
Nitztarekh la’azor le-atzmenu!
“We will have to help ourselves.”

Note that עצמנו (atzmenu), meaning “ourselves,” is interchangeably used to refer to male, female, or mixed gender groups of people and things in the plural form.

2nd Person Plural – Male

1. Subject
  • אתם
    Atem
    “You”

אתם הבנים של רפה, נכון?
Atem ha-banim shel Rafa, nakhon?
“You’re Rafa’s sons, right?”

2. Object
  • אתכם
    Etkhem
    “You” (object)

ראיתי אתכם בפארק אתמול.
Ra’iti etkhem ba-park etmol.
“I saw you in the park yesterday.”

3. Possessive
  • שלכם
    Shelakhem
    “Your” / “Yours”

ההורים שלכם גרים בניו יורק?
Ha-horim shelakhem garim be-Nyu York?
“Do your parents live in New York?”

הכסף הזה שלכם?
Ha-kesef hazeh shelakhem?
“Is this money yours?”

4. Reflexive
  • עצמכם
    Atzmekhem
    “Yourselves”

הסתכלו על עצמכם.
Histaklu al atzmekhem.
“Look at yourselves.”

2nd Person Plural – Female

1. Subject
  • אתן
    Aten
    “You”

אתן הבנות של רפה, נכון?
Aten ha-banot shel Rafa, nakhon?
“You’re Rafa’s daughters, right?”

2. Object
  • אתכן
    Etkhen
    “You” (object)

ראיתי אתכן בפארק אתמול.
Ra’iti etkhen ba-park etmol.
“I saw you in the park yesterday.”

3. Possessive
  • שלכן
    Shelakhen
    “Your” / “Yours”

ההורים שלכן גרים בניו יורק?
Ha-horim shelakhen garim be-Nyu York?
“Do your parents live in New York?”

הכסף הזה שלכן?
Hakesef hazeh shelakhen?
“Is this money yours?”

4. Reflexive
  • עצמכן
    Atzmekhen
    “Yourselves”

הסתכלו על עצמכן.
Histaklu al atzmekhen.
“Look at yourselves.”

3rd Person Plural – Male

1. Subject
  • הם
    Hem
    “They”

הם גרים לא רחוק מכאן.
Hem garim lo rachok mi-kan.
“They live not far from here.”

2. Object
  • אותם.
    Otam
    “Them”

אני לא מכיר אותם.
Ani lo makir otam.
“I don’t know them.”

  • אלה
    Eleh
    “These (ones)” / “Those (ones)”

אלה הדברים שלי או שלך?
Eleh ha-dvarim sheli o shelkha?
“Are these my things or yours?”

We can also use this variation:

  • אלו
    Elu
    “These (ones)” / “Those (ones)”

אלו הדברים שלי או שלך?
Elu ha-dvarim sheli o shelkha?
“Are these my things or yours?”

Note that אלה (eleh), meaning “these” / “those” and אלו (elu), meaning “these” / “those,” are used as both subject and object. Also note that both are interchangeably used to refer to male, female, or mixed gender people and things in plural.

3. Possessive
  • שלהם
    Shelahem
    “Their” / “Theirs”

איפה הבית שלהם?
Eifoh ha-bayit shelahem?
“Where is their house?”

הבית הזה שלהם.
Ha-bayit hazeh shelahem.
“This house is theirs.”

4. Reflexive
  • עצמם
    Atzmam
    “Themselves”

הם לא מרגישים כמו עצמם היום.
Hem lo margishim kemo atzmam hayom.
“They don’t feel themselves today.”

3rd Person Plural – Female

1. Subject
  • הן
    Hen
    “They”

הן גרות לא רחוק מכאן.
Hen garot lo rachok mi-kan
“They live not far from here.”

2. Object
  • אותן
    Otan
    “Them”

אני לא מכיר אותן.
Ani lo makir otan.
“I don’t know them.”

3. Possessive
  • שלהן
    Shelahen
    “Their” / “Theirs”

איפה הבית שלהן?
Eifoh ha-bayit shelahen?
“Where is their house?”

הבית הזה שלהן.
Ha-bayit hazeh shelahen.
“This house is theirs.”

4. Reflexive
  • עצמן
    Atzman
    “Themselves”

הן לא מרגישות כמו עצמן היום.
Hen lo margishot kemo atzman hayom.
“They don’t feel themselves today.”

2. Hebrew Demonstrative Pronouns

Finger Pointing

Another type of pronoun is the Hebrew demonstrative pronouns. These are used to make reference to nouns or to distinguish specific people, places, or things from others. Whenever we talk about “this” and “that,” we’re using demonstrative pronouns. So let’s see some Hebrew demonstrative pronouns, along with examples.

1- Singular – Male

  • זה
    Zeh
    “It” / “This (one)”

אני לא אוהב את הספר ההוא. אני אוהב את הספר הזה.
Ani lo ohev et ha-sefer hahu. Ani ohev et ha-sefer hazeh.
“I don’t like that book. I like this one.”

זה חבר שלי, רון.
Zeh chaver sheli, Ron.
“This is my boyfriend, Ron.”

Note that זה (zeh), meaning “it,” is used as both subject and object.

2- Singular – Female

  • זאת
    Zot
    “It” / “This (one)”

אני לא אוהב את המסעדה ההיא. אני אוהב את זאת.
Ani lo ohev et ha-mis’adah hahi. Ani ohev et zot.
“I don’t like that restaurant. I like this one.”

זאת חברה שלי, רוני.
Zot chaverah sheli, Roni.
“This is my girlfriend, Roni.”

We can also use this variation:

  • זו
    Zu
    “It” / “This (one)”

זו חברה שלי, רוני.
Zu chaverah sheli, Roni.
“This is my girlfriend, Roni.”

Note that זאת (zot), meaning “it” and זו (zu), meaning “it,” are used as both subject and object. 

3- Plural

  • אלה
    Eleh
    “These (ones)” / “Those (ones)”

אלה הדברים שלי או שלך?
Eleh ha-dvarim sheli o shelkha?
“Are these my things or yours?”

We can also use this variation:

  • אלו
    Elu
    “These (ones)” / “Those (ones)”

אלו הדברים שלי או שלך?
Elu ha-dvarim sheli o shelkha?
“Are these my things or yours?”

Note that אלה (eleh), meaning “these” / “those” and אלו (elu), meaning “these” / “those,” are used as both subject and object. Also note that both are interchangeably used to refer to male, female, or mixed gender groups of people and things in plural.

3. Hebrew Interrogative Pronouns

Question Marks

As mentioned earlier, one of the two basic categories of pronouns are interrogative pronouns. To refresh your memory, these are the ones we use in questions, and they’re words that become the grammatical subject of the question. 

For example, when we ask “Where are you?” the word “where” is the subject of the sentence, substituting the name of a place, which we don’t know—hence the question! 

Let’s see what these are and how they look in the next section of our Hebrew pronouns list.  

  • מה
    Mah
    “What”

מה אתה עושה בסוף השבוע?
Mah atah oseh besof hashavua?
“What are you doing this weekend?”

  • איזה
    Eyzeh
    “Which” (male)

באיזה שולחן בא לך (לשבת)?
Eyzeh shulchan ba lekha (lashevet)?
“Which table do you feel like [sitting at]?”

  • איזו
    Eyzo
    “Which” (female)

איזו רכבת מגיעה לעכו?
Eyzo rakevet megia le-Ako?
“Which train goes to Akko?”

  • מי
    Mi
    “Who” / “Whom”

מי אמר גלידה ולא קיבל?
Mi amar glidah ve-lo kibel?
“Who said ‘ice cream’ and didn’t get any?”

עם מי אכלת ארוחת בוקר?
Im mi akhalta aruchat boker?
“Whom did you have breakfast with?”

  • מתי
    Matay
    “When”

אתם יודעים מתי מתחיל הסרט?
Atem yodim matay matchil haseret?
“Do you know when the movie starts?”

  • למה?
    Lamah
    “Why”

אתן יודעות למה לא טוב לאכול לפני השינה?
Aten yodot lamah lo tov leekhol lifney hasheyna?
“Do you know why it’s not good to eat before sleeping?”

4. Hebrew Indefinite Pronouns

Basic Questions

The final category of pronouns in Hebrew are the indefinite pronouns. This type of pronoun is used to reference non-specific or general nouns. These pronouns can be very useful when we want to make any sort of generalization. Let’s have a look at them!

  • כולם
    Kulam
    “Everyone”

כולם יודעים שאין כמו בירה קרה ביום חם.
Kulam yodim sheeyn kmo birah karah beyom cham.
“Everyone knows there’s nothing like a cold beer on a hot day.”

  • כולנו
    Kulanu
    “All of us”

כולנו עייפים אז בואו נישן.
Kulanu ayefim az bou nishan.
“All of us are tired, so let’s sleep.”

  • הכל
    Hakol
    “Everything”

אל תדאג, הכל בסדר.
Al tidag, hakol beseder.
“Don’t worry, everything is fine.”

  • כל דבר
    Kol davar
    “Everything” / “Anything”

כל דבר שאני עושה מצליח!
Kol davar sheani oseh matzliach!
“Everything/Anything I do succeeds!”

  • כל מקום
    Kol makhom
    “Everywhere” / “Anywhere”

אני אשמח להיות בכל מקום חוץ מכאן! יש זבל בכל מקום.
Ani esmach lehiyot bekhol makhom chutz mikan! Yesh zevel bekhol makhom.
“I’d be happy to be anywhere but here! There is garbage everywhere.”

The following are common negative indefinite pronouns. Note in the examples that in Hebrew, we use the double negative.

  • שום דבר
    Shum davar
    “Nothing”

לא עשיתי שום דבר היום.
Lo asiti shum davar hayom.
“I did nothing today.”

  • אף אחד
    Af echad
    “No one”

אף אחד לא הוציא את הזבל?
Af echad lo hotzi et hazevel?
“No one took out the trash?”

  • אף מקום
    Af makhom
    “Nowhere”

אני לא מוצא את הכפכפים שלי באף מקום.
Ani lo motzeh et hakafkafim sheli beaf makhom.
“I can’t find my flipflops anywhere.”

  • משהו
    Mashehu
    “Something”

יש לך משהו קר לשתות?
Yesh lakh mashehu kar lishtot?
“Do you have something cold to drink?”

  • מישהו
    Mishehu
    “Someone”

מישהו הזמין כאן פיצה?
Mishehu hizmin kan pitza?
“Did someone here order a pizza?”

  • איפשהו
    Eyfoshehu
    “Somewhere”

אני בטוח שהשארתי את המשקפיים שלי כאן איפשהו.
Ani batuach shehisharti et hamishkafayim sheli kan eyfoshehu.
“I’m sure I left my glasses here somewhere.”

5. Conclusion: Master Hebrew the Fun Way with HebrewPod101.com!

Improve Listening

Great job! You’ve made it through this pronoun lesson in one piece. I know that Hebrew language pronouns are a lot to take in, but pronouns are truly part of the backbone of your Hebrew language mastery. So just pick a few at a time and give them some practice. It’s definitely worth it, as you can see how practical these words are, and how often we use them in everyday conversations. Plus, knowing your Hebrew pronouns will help you avoid a whole lot of confusion when you’re conversing with other Hebrew speakers.

So definitely take the time to study this Hebrew pronouns list and the examples, and go ahead and practice using them to talk about yourself, your family, your pets, your home—anything you feel like. As long as it’s a person, place, thing, or idea, it’s a noun. And as long as it’s a noun, it can be replaced by a pronoun!

I hope you found this lesson useful. Feel free to let us know in the comments below how you feel about using pronouns in Hebrew! Feeling confident, or still a bit uncertain? We look forward to hearing from you, and hope that you’ll continue visiting HebrewPod101.com throughout your journey to language mastery! Shalom!

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Premium PLUS: The Golden Ticket for Language-Learning

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Do you remember the moment you fell in love with languages?

Do you desire to learn or advance in Hebrew quickly and effectively?

Then you need a Hebrew tutor.

A common question that first-time language-learners ask is “Where do I begin?” The answer? Guidance.

For native English-speakers who want to learn Asian languages, for example, timelines provided by the U.S. Foreign Service Institute can appear discouraging. However, defeating these odds is not unheard of. If you want to beat the odds yourself, one of the best learning options is a subscription to Premium PLUS from Innovative Language.

As an active Premium PLUS member of JapanesePod101.com and KoreanClass101.com myself, I have an enjoyable experience learning at an accelerated pace with at least thirty minutes of study daily. The following Premium PLUS features contribute to my success:

  • Access to thousands of lessons
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  • Spaced-repetition system (SRS) flashcards
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As someone who decided to make Japanese her second language one year ago, I am extremely grateful for Premium PLUS.

Allow me to emphasize on how these Premium PLUS features strengthen my language studies.

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As a Premium PLUS member, I have full access to the lesson library and other Premium features. Best of all, I’m not limited to one level; I can learn to my heart’s content with upper-level courses.

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Practice Speaking with the Voice Recording Tool!

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Pronunciation is an essential ingredient in language-learning. Proper pronunciation prompts clear understanding during conversations with native speakers.

Prior to learning full Korean sentences, my online Korean language tutor assigned the “Hana Hana Hangul” pathway to me. It demonstrated the writing and pronunciation of Hangul, the Korean alphabet. Throughout this pathway, I submitted recordings of my Hangul character pronunciations to my language teacher for review.

I was given a similar task on JapanesePod101.com with the “Ultimate Japanese Pronunciation Guide” pathway. My Japanese language teacher tested my pronunciation of the Japanese characters kana. My completion of the two pathways boosted my confidence in speaking.

Speaking is one of the more challenging components of learning a language. The voice recording tool in particular was a great way for me to improve my speaking skills. Further, because the lesson dialogues are spoken by native speakers, I’m able to practice speaking naturally.

This feature is also available for vocabulary words and sample sentences. Being able to hear these recordings improves my pronunciation skills for languages like Japanese, where intonation can change the meaning of a word entirely. The voice recorder examines my speed and tone. I also follow up by sending a recording to my online language tutor for feedback.

A great way to boost one’s speaking confidence is to shadow native speakers. During the vocabulary reviews, it’s helpful for me to hear the breakdown of each word; doing so makes a word that was originally difficult to even read a breeze to say!

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Example Scenario:

The host asks the following question:

어디에 살고 있습니까?

eodieseo salgo isseumnikka

“Where do you live?”

If you live in Tokyo, you would readily say the following:

도쿄에 살고 있습니다.

Tokyo-e salgo isseumnida.

“I live in Tokyo.”

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Imagine having a conversation with a native speaker and hesitating because you lack a solid vocabulary base.

Premium PLUS offers various features to expand learners’ vocabulary, including Free Gifts of the Month. HebrewPod101’s free gifts for April 2020 included an e-book with “400 Everyday Phrases for Beginners,” and the content is updated every month. When I download free resources like this, I find opportunities to use them with co-teachers, friends, or my language tutors.

An effective way to learn vocabulary is with SRS flashcards. SRS is a system designed for learning a new word and reviewing it in varying time intervals.

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After studying a number of flashcards, I change the card types to listening comprehension and/or production. Then I test myself by writing the translation of the word or the spoken word or phrase.

The change in settings allow me to remember vocabulary and learn how to identify the words. This is especially helpful with Japanese kanji!

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Homework assignments are advantageous to my language studies. There are homework assignments auto-generated weekly. They range from multiple-choice quizzes to writing assignments.

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Every weekend, I review by re-reading those written sentences. It helps me remember sentence structures, grammar points, and vocabulary to apply in real-world contexts.

Furthermore, I can track my progress with language portfolios every trimester. It’s like a midterm exam that tests my listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.

Get Your Own Personal Language Teacher!

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My language teachers cater to my goals with personalized and achievable learning programs. The tangible support of my online language teachers makes it evident that we share common goals.

Once I share a short-term or long-term goal with my teacher, we establish a plan or pathway that will ultimately result in success. I coordinate with my teachers regularly to ensure the personalized learning programs are prosperous. For example, during my JLPT studies, my Japanese language tutor assigned me practice tests.

Your language tutor is available for outside help as well. When I bought drama CDs in Japan, I had difficulty transliterating the dialogue. My Japanese teacher forwarded me the script to read along as I listened.

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A remarkable thing happened to me in South Korea. I was stressed about opening a bank account with limited Korean. I sought help from my Korean teacher. She forwarded me a script of a bank conversation.

After two days, I visited the local bank. It all started with my opening sentence:

은행 계좌를 만들고 싶어요

eunhaeng gyejwaleul mandeulgo sip-eoyo.

I want to open a bank account.

Everything went smoothly, and I exited the bank with a new account!

The MyTeacher Messenger allows me to share visuals with my teachers for regular interaction, including videos to critique my pronunciation mechanisms. I improve my listening and speaking skills by exchanging audio with my teachers. In addition to my written homework assignments, I exchange messages with my language teachers in my target language. This connection with my teachers enables me to experience the culture as well as the language.

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It’s impossible for me to imagine my continuous progress with Japanese and Korean without Premium PLUS. Everything—from the SRS flashcards to my language teachers—makes learning languages enjoyable and clear-cut.

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Complete lessons and assignments to advance in your target language. Increase your vocabulary with the “2000 Core Word List” for that language and SRS flashcards. Learn on-the-go with the Innovative Language app and/or Podcasts app for iOS users.

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Best Ways to Ask for and Give Directions in Hebrew

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As anyone who has ever traveled knows, getting around without getting lost during your stay abroad is an absolute necessity. Without the proper language elements to ask for and understand directions in Hebrew, it can be quite a challenge to get around without confusion. So whether traveling on foot or by vehicle, in a private or rental car, or by bus or train, it’s essential to arm yourself with some basic vocabulary and grammar so you can get from point A to point B while in unfamiliar territory. 

This is as true in Israel as anywhere, and in some ways even truer, considering that a wrong turn could lead you to a security checkpoint you never wanted to go through! So let’s take a look at some of the building blocks for asking for and understanding directions in Hebrew—soon you’ll be cruising the streets of Tel Aviv or Jerusalem with no problem!

Let’s begin by looking at some different situations where we may find ourselves asking for, receiving, or even giving directions. Considering that situations involving directions can often feel rather stressful, involving as they do multiple instructions and unfamiliar names of places, it’s a good idea to take the time to learn about directions in Hebrew and get some practice in before using this language in the real world. 

One very effective way to do so is to get ahold of a map of the part of the country you plan to visit, and practice with a partner (or multiple partners), taking turns giving and asking for directions with the map in front of you. Maps of most Israeli cities are available for free online via their municipal websites. 
As you’re practicing, remember to think about masculine versus feminine pronouns and verbs depending on whom you’re speaking to. Further consider whether the noun and adjectives you’re using are masculine or feminine.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Around Town in Hebrew Table of Contents
  1. Go, Go, Go
  2. On the Map: Compass Directions in Hebrew
  3. On the Road
  4. Landmarks
  5. Must-know Phrases for Asking for Directions
  6. Must-know Phrases for Giving Directions
  7. Putting it Together
  8. Conclusion

1. Go, Go, Go

Basic Questions

The first thing we ought to take note of is that directions in Hebrew, unlike in English, we must choose the correct word for the verb “go,” depending on whether we’re traveling in a vehicle or on foot. ללכת (lalekhet) is the infinitive form of the word “go” if we’re walking. So, for example, if we’re trying to walk to the bus station, we might approach someone and say:

  • אני רוצה ללכת לתחנה המרכזית.

Ani rotzeh lalekhet la-tachana ha-merkazit.

“I would like to go [walking] to the bus station.”

On the other hand, if we’re traveling by car, taxi, or public transportation, we would use the verb לנסוע (linsoa), which means “go” by vehicle. To use the previous example, in this case we would say:

  • אני רוצה לנסוע לתחנה המרכזית.

Ani rotzeh linsoa la-tachana ha-merkazit.

“I would like to go [by vehicle] to the bus station.”

Another option we could use, which can also be a go-to word in case we can’t remember or aren’t certain how we plan to travel, is to say “get to” or “reach” without specifying the means of travel. This word is להגיע (lihagia). Again, to use the same example, we would say:

  • אני רוצה להגיע לתחנה המרכזית.

Ani rotzeh lehagia la-tachana ha-merkazit.

“I would like to get to the bus station.”

The answer to these questions is likely to match the same verb we used in the question. This is because in Hebrew, the verb for “go” depends on how the person is going from point A to point B. For example, if we are trying to get directions for driving to the bus station, we might hear something like:

  • אתה נוסע שני קילומטרים לכיוון צפון וזה מצד ימין.

Ata nose’a shney kilometrim lekivun tzafon ve-zeh mitzad yemin.

“You go [driving] two kilometers to the north and it’s on the right-hand side.”

On the other hand, if we were walking, we might hear:

  • אתה הולך שני קילומטרים לכיוון צפון וזה מצד ימין.

Ata holekh shney kilometrim lekivun tzafon ve-zeh mitzad yemin.

“You go [walking] two kilometers to the north and it’s on the right-hand side.”

2. On the Map: Compass Directions in Hebrew

Directions

Looking at any map, one of the first things we tend to notice is the compass, which indicates the cardinal directions: north, south, east, and west. Of course, we use these directions often to talk about where we’re headed or where we’ve come from. 

We’re also likely to use relative directions, which simply express the location of a place relative to other places, landmarks, or our current location. Let’s take a deeper look at how to use these language elements in the context of directions in Hebrew.

Looking at our compass, we have the cardinal directions in Hebrew:

צפון (tzafon) — “north”

דרום (darom) — “south”

מערב (maarav) — “west”

מזרח (mizrach) — “east”

Note that these are all in nominal (noun) form, but we can also use them as adverbs of direction by just adding ה to the end of the words. For example:

סע צפונה עד הרמזור.

Sa tzafonah ad ha-ramzor.

“Go [by vehicle] north until the stoplight.”

Or:

לך מערבה קילומטר וחצי.

Lekh ma’aravah kilometer va-chetzi.

“Go [walking] west a kilometer and a half.”

Cardinal directions can also be used to describe the general location of something. For example:

הטיילת נמצאת בחלק המזרחי של העיר.

Ha-teyelet nimzyt ba-chelek ha-mizrachi shel ha-ir.

“The boardwalk is located in the eastern part of the city.”

אילת נמצאת בדרום ישראל.

Eylat nimzet be-drom Yisrael.

“Eilat is in the south of Israel.”

Notice the importance of the passive verb להימצא (lehimatza), meaning “to be found/located.” In Hebrew, we use this very often to indicate the location of a place, as in the previous example.

In addition to cardinal directions, we often use or hear relative directions or indications when asking for directions in Hebrew on the street. For example:

סע צפונה שני קילומטרים והתחנה המרכזית מול הקניון.

Sa tzafona shney kilometrim ve-haetachanah ha-merkazit mul ha-kenyon.

“Go north two kilometers, and the bus station is opposite the mall.”

Here are some other relative directions we might encounter or want to use:

ליד (liyad) — “next to”

ההתחנה המרכזית נמצאת ליד הבנק.

Ha-tchanah ha-merkazit nimtset leyad ha-bank.

“The bus station is next to the bank.”

קרוב ל… (karov li…) — “near”

התחנה המרכזית קרובה לפארק.

Hatchanah ha-merkazit krovah la-park.

“The bus station is near the park.”

אחרי (acharey) — “past”

התחנה המרכזית נמצאת אחרי הרמזור.

Ha-tchanah ha-merkazit nimtset acharey haramzor.

“The bus station is past the stoplight.”

מאחורי (meachorey) — “behind”

התחנה המרכזית נמצאת מאחורי המוזיאון.

Ha-tchanah ha-merkazit nimtset me’achorey ha-muzeon.

“The bus station is behind the museum.”

3. On the Road

Navigation on the Road

One of the most common situations in which we’re likely to ask for or give directions in Hebrew is, of course, while on the road. It’s useful to know some of the more common phrases in this context to help us as we try to navigate the highways, streets, and even alleyways of Israel. So let’s take a look at some useful vocabulary and phrases that will help us along the way.

One of the more common things we might hear or say with reference to directions on the road is an indication of how far away something is from where we are or from another point of reference (like a landmark). We might ask, for example:

  • מה המרחק מכאן לבאר שבע?

Mah ha-merchak mikan le-Be’er Sheva?

“How far is Beer-Sheva?” [Literally: “What is the distance from here to Beer-Sheva?”]

We could also ask the same question like this:

  • מה המרחק מכאן לבאר שבע?

Ma ha-merchak  mi-kan le-Be’er Sheva?

“How far is Beer-Sheva?”

Note that in the answer, we omit the words מרחק (merchak) meaning “distance” and רחוק (rachok) meaning “far.” For instance:

  • באר שבע נמצאת בערך 20 קילומטרים מכאן.

Be’er Sheva nimtset be-erekh esrim kilometrim mi-kan.

“Beer-Sheva is about twenty kilometers away.”

However, if the answer is more general, you’ll hear or say something like this:

  • לא רחוק.

Lo rachok.

“Not far.”

Or:

  • רחקה מאוד.

Rchok meod.

“Very far.”

Similarly, we might also get the answer קרובה (krovah) meaning “close” or קרובה מאוד (krovah meod) meaning “very close.”

קרוב and רחוק can also be used to orient us relative to other landmarks. Here are some examples:

  • שדה התעופה קרוב לצומת.

Sdeh ha-teufah karov la-tzomet.

“The airport is close to the intersection.”

  • תחנת הרכבת לא רחוקה מהסופר.

Tachanat ha-rakevet lo rechokah me-ha-super.

“The train station is not far from the supermarket.”

Below are examples of other common phrases to encounter when giving or getting directions in Hebrew on the road:

לצד ימין של (litzad yemin shel) — “to the right of”

  • גן החיות נמצא לצד ימין של הספרייה.

Gan hachayot nimtza litzad yemin shel hasifriyah.

“The zoo is to the right of the library.”

לצד שמאל של (litzad smol shel) — “to the left of”

  • משרד הדואר נמצא משמאל לאצטדיון.

Misrad ha-doar nimtsa mi-smol la-itzadiyon.

“The post office is to the left of the stadium.”

מסביב לפינה (misaviv lapinah) — “around the corner”

  • אתה נוסע לצומת הבא וחנות הספרים מעבר לפינה.

Atah nose’a latzmoet haba ve-chanut ha-sfarim me-ever la pinah.

“You go [driving] to the next intersection, and the bookstore is around the corner.”

לפני (lifney) — “before”

  • אתה עובר שני צמתים והבנק נמצא בדיוק לפני הצומת השלישי.

Atah over shney tzmatim ve-ha-bank nimtsa bediyuk lifney ha-tzomet ha-shlishi.

“You go through two intersections, and the bank is just before the third intersection.”

מאחורי (meachorey) — “behind”

  • החניה נמצאת מאחורי דוכן הפירות.

Ha-chanayah nimtset me’achorey duchan ha-peyrot.

“The parking lot is behind the fruit stand.”

אחרי (acharey) — “after/past”

  • סע ישר ופנה ימינה בדיוק אחרי שאתה עובר את הכיכר.

Sa yashar u-pneh yeminah bediyuk acharey she-atah over et ha-kikar.

“Go [driving] straight, and turn right just past the rotary.”

Note two things in the last example. First of all, notice the verb for “turn,” which is לפנות (lifnot). This is obviously very important to know in the context of getting around. Also note that, just as with the cardinal directions, we can turn relative directions into adverbs by adding a ה to the end of them. So:

ימין (yamin) meaning “right” becomes ימינה (yeminah) meaning “to the right.”

שמאל (smol) meaning “left” becomes שמאלה (smolah) meaning “to the left.”

We also have:

  • קדימה (kadimah) meaning “forward”
  • אחורה (achorah) meaning “back”

There are obviously some exceptions to this morphology. The most common one is:

ישר (yashar) meaning “straight.”

4. Landmarks

Landmark

Among the more important vocabulary for us to know when we set out to learn about directions in Hebrew are words that describe landmarks. Obviously, this is important because landmarks are commonly used as references, especially when speaking with a tourist who’s unlikely to know street names but will readily be able to identify landmarks. We’ve already seen quite a few of these in context:

  • תחנה מרכזית (tachanah merkazit) — “bus station”
  • תחנת רכבת (tachanat rakevet) — “train station”
  • שדה תעופה (sdeh teufah) — “airport”
  • פרק (park) — “park”
  • בנק (bank) — “bank”
  • טיילת (tayelet) — “boardwalk”
  • מוזאון (muzeon) — “museum”
  • צומת (tzomet) — “intersection”
  • חניה (chanayah) — “parking lot”
  • רמזור (ramzor) — “traffic light”
  • כיכר (kikar) — “rotary”

Now, let’s have a look at some other common landmarks!

מרכז (merkaz) — “downtown” [literally, “center”]

במרכז תמצא הרבה חנויות ומסעדות.

Ba-merkaz timtza harbeh chanuyot ve-mis’adot.

“You’ll find a lot of stores and restaurants in the center.”

מלון (malon) — “hotel”

בשביל להגיע למלון, פנה שמאלה ברמזור והמשך ישר חמש דקות בערך.

Bishil lehagi’a la-malon, pneh smola ba-ramzor ve-hamshekh yashar chamesh dakot be-erekh.

“To get to the hotel, turn left at the light and keep going straight for about five minutes.”

בית חולים (beyt cholim) — “hospital”

בית החולים נמצא מול הבנק.

Beyt ha-cholim nimtza mul ha-bank.

“The hospital is across from the bank.”

תחנת משטרה (tachanat mishtarah) — “police station”

איך אני מגיע לתחנת המשטרה, בבקשה?

Eykh ani magia le-tachanat ha-mistarah, be-vakashah?

“How do I get to the police station, please?”

Crosswalk

מעבר חציה (ma’avar chatzayah) — “crosswalk”

בצומת הבא, עבור את מעבר החציה ופנה ימינה.

Batzomet habah, avor et ma’avar ha-chatzayah u-pneh yeminah.

“At the next intersection, cross the crosswalk and turn right.”

קיוסק (kiyosk) — “kiosk”

עדיף שתשאל בקיוסק.

Adif shetishal bakiyosk.

“You’d be better off asking at the kiosk.”

תחנת דלק (tachanat delek) — “gas station”

המוזיאון נמצא בדיוק לפני תחנת הדלק.

Ha-muzeon nimtza bediyuk lifney tachanat ha-delek.

“The museum is just before the gas station.”

תחנת אוטובוס (tachanat otobus) — “bus stop”

להגיע לתחנת האוטובוס הקרובה, לך צפונה כשלוש דקות ואתה תראה אותה ליד הפרק.

 Lihagia letachanat haotobus hakrovah, lekh tzafonah kishalosh dakot viataha tireh otah liyad hapark.

“To get to the nearest bus stop, walk north about three minutes and you will see it next to the park.”

שירותים (sheyrutim) — “bathroom”

יש שירותים בבנק.

Yesh sheyrutim ba-bank.

“There is a bathroom in the bank.”

5. Must-know Phrases for Asking for Directions

Directions

By now, we’ve built up a pretty good vocabulary for asking for and giving directions in Hebrew. Let’s go a bit further and take a look at some essential expressions when giving or getting directions in Hebrew. 

Note that some of the language here will be formal. Even though modern Hebrew isn’t terribly formal, it’s preferable to use it to be polite, particularly since you’ll most likely be talking to strangers. Of course, if this isn’t the case, and you’re asking your friends for directions, you can speak to them in a more familiar tone.

Let’s start with basic phrases for asking directions, with examples to show them in context:

  • איך אני מגיע לתל אביב?

Eykh ani magia le-Tel Aviv?

“How do I get to Tel Aviv?”

  • איפה השירותים?

Eyfo ha-sheyrutim?

“Where is the bathroom?”

The above examples are obviously quite direct and therefore informal. To make them more formal, we would simply start with סליחה (slichah) meaning “excuse/pardon me,” and then add a phrase before the question to make it indirect and thus more formal and polite. Using the previous two examples, here are two common options:

  • סליחה, האם תוכל לומר לי איך אני מגיע לתל אביב?

Slichah, hayim tukhal lomar li eykh ani magia le-Tel Aviv?

“Excuse me, could you tell me how I get to Tel Aviv?”

  • סליחה, האם אתה יודע איפה השירותים?

Slichah, hayim atah yode’a eyfo ha-sheyrutim?

“Excuse me, do you know where the bathroom is?”

When we get directions, whether from a friend, family member, or a stranger, it is, of course, considered polite to say thank you. Here are a few ways to do so. Don’t forget to use them, even if you’re in a rush!

  • תודה.

Todah.

“Thank you.”

  • תודה רבה.

Todah rabah.

“Thank you very much.”

  • אני מודה לך על העזרה.

Ani modeh lekha al ha-ezrah.

“I thank you for the help.”

  • נחמד מאוד מצידך.

Nechmad meod mitzidkha.

“How nice of you.”

6. Must-know Phrases for Giving Directions

While you may mostly be thinking of asking for directions, don’t be at all surprised if someone ends up asking you for directions and you suddenly find the tables turned. This seems to be a subset of Murphy’s Law! But consider this an extra motivator to really work on your mastery of this language; you can repay the favor someday, and not only be the recipient of directions but also be able to give them yourself! 

Here are some essential words and phrases for giving directions in Hebrew and how to use them:

  • לך/סע ישר.

Lekh/sa yashar.

“Go [walking/driving] straight.”

  • חזור.

Chazor.

“Go back.”

  • עשה פרסה.

Aseh parsah.

“Make a U-turn.”

  • פנה ימינה/שמאלה.

Pneh yeminah/smolah.

“Turn right/left.”

  • המשך.

Hamshekh.

“Continue.”

  • עצור.

Atzor.

“Stop.”

  • לא תוכל לפספס את זה.

Lo tukhal lefasfes et zeh.

“You can’t miss it.”

7. Putting it Together

Now that you know more vocabulary and basic sentence structures, here’s a more elaborate example of how to give directions in Hebrew:

בשביל להגיע לבית החולים, סע ישר בכביש הראשי לכיוון צפון עד הצומת השלישי. עשה פרסה וחזור לכיוון דרום. פנה ימינה בדיוק לפני הרמזור והמשך שני קילומטרים. עצור בבנק ופנה שם שמאלה. תמשיך עוד חצי קילומטר ובית החולים יהיה מצד ימין. לא תוכל לפספס את זה.

Lihagia liveyt hacholim, sa yashar bakvish harashi likivun tzafon ad hatzomet hashlishi. Aseh  parsah vichazor likivun darom. Pneh yeminah bidiyuk lifney haramzor vitamshikh shney kilometrim. Atzor babank upneh sham smolah. Tamshikh od chetzi kilometer vibeyt hacholim yihiyeh mitzad yeminkha. Lo tukhal lifasfes et zeh.

“To get to the hospital, go [driving] straight north on the highway until the third intersection. Make a U-turn and return south. Turn right just before the light, and continue two kilometers. Stop at the bank, and turn left there. Continue another half kilometer, and the hospital will be on your right-hand side. You can’t miss it.”

Righthand turn sign

7. Conclusion

Directions can often feel like one of the more stressful aspects of learning a language. But with a bit of practice, it can actually become a truly gratifying experience to show yourself you’re capable of navigating a new place and finding your way! Israelis are sure to help you out when they see that you’ve taken the time to learn their language, so fear not! 

And remember, since Israelis all serve an obligatory two or three years in the military, you’re more than likely to encounter an expert navigator who will surely be able to help you find your way! What’s more, Israelis are extremely proud of their knowledge of the lay of the land, and this will come across in their willingness to explain in detail exactly how to get where you’re going. Just get yourself some maps and a partner and practice these language elements before you go “out in the field” navigating. And, as always, have fun!
Before you head off, let us know in the comments how you feel about asking for and giving directions in Hebrew! More confident, or still a little fuzzy? We look forward to hearing from you, and hope that you’ll continue visiting HebrewPod101.com on your journey to language mastery! 

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People, Places & Things – Your First 100 Hebrew Nouns

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Today, we’re going to give you a complete guide to Hebrew nouns for beginners. In case you’ve forgotten your middle school grammar lessons, nouns, broadly speaking, are words that describe people, places, and things, as well as concepts and ideas. Along with verbs, they are the basic building blocks of language, and are so important that they’re usually the first words a baby learns. (Think of words like “mama,” “ball,” and “bottle.”)

With that in mind, you can see how learning from a list of Hebrew nouns that are used in everyday speech, and practicing their use, is a great way to make a big leap in your progress as a language-learner.

Before we jump into our Hebrew nouns list, though, let’s go over a few basic things to keep in mind as far as Hebrew grammar goes.

Hebrew Nouns: Gender

Nouns

So, do Hebrew nouns have gender? 

First of all, similar to languages such as Spanish and German, there’s the issue of grammatical gender with Hebrew nouns. All nouns, whether they have a biological gender or not, are grammatically either male or female.

How do you know if a word is feminine or masculine in Hebrew?

The good news is that, unlike in other languages with this feature, Hebrew uses the same article for ALL nouns, whether male or female, singular or plural. Though the plural form does change depending on whether a noun is male ז’ – זכר (zakhar) or female נקבה – נ’  (nekeyvah). 

Also, we’ll need to use the right Hebrew declensions for any verbs and adjectives we use with these nouns.

Hebrew Dual Nouns

In addition, Hebrew features a dual form for nouns that come in twos, such as eyes, shoes, bicycles, etc.

Another important factor is that to make some compound nouns, Hebrew uses something called a construct state, where the first word becomes genitive (possessive) and may change its vowels, and possibly a letter—and therefore its pronunciation. In these cases, the article (in cases where it’s needed) also jumps to the second word (the possessed noun).

We won’t go too much into detail about Hebrew construct nouns or Hebrew possessive nouns here, but do keep what we went over in mind.

Irregular Hebrew Nouns

There are also some irregular Hebrew nouns, where a noun uses the feminine plural suffix or some other morphology. These are just exceptions we need to memorize, like person and people in English.

Don’t worry, though, if this all sounds complicated. Like with all languages, you have to start somewhere and take it bit by bit. So for today, we’ll just focus on learning about nouns in Hebrew, and where necessary, explain the grammar that goes with them.

To make it a bit easier to practice, we’ll look at the top 100 Hebrew nouns, divided into eight categories: 

  • Appliances
  • Technology
  • Transportation
  • Restaurant
  • School essentials
  • Occupation
  • Family members
  • Body parts

Ready to start our Hebrew nouns list? Here we go!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Hebrew Table of Contents
  1. Nouns in Hebrew: Appliances
  2. Nouns in Hebrew: Technology
  3. Nouns in Hebrew: Transportation
  4. Nouns in Hebrew: Restaurants
  5. Nouns in Hebrew: School Essentials
  6. Nouns in Hebrew: Occupations
  7. Nouns in Hebrew: Family Members
  8. Nouns in Hebrew: Body Parts
  9. Nouns in Hebrew: Time
  10. Conclusion: Nouns are a Great Place to Start!

1. Nouns in Hebrew: Appliances

Various appliances

Appliances are a great place to start your study of Hebrew nouns, since they’re things we use on a daily basis in all sorts of situations. You might just be visiting a friend’s house and need help using the kitchen toaster at breakfast, or perhaps you want to buy a new dryer for your new apartment in Haifa. Let’s see some common Hebrew nouns related to appliances.

1. (‘טלוויזיה (נ – TV

televizyah

לטלוויזיה הזאת יש רזולוציה גבוהה.

La-televizyah hazot yesh rezolutsya gvohah.

“This TV has HD technology.” 

2. (‘מקרר (ז – refrigerator

mikarer

המקרר שלנו התקלקל ועכשיו כל האוכל רקוב.

Ha-mekarer shelanu hitkalkel ve-akhshav kol ha-okhel rakuv.

“Our refrigerator broke down and now all the food is rotten.” 

3. (‘מזגן (ז – air conditioner

mazgan

תדליק את המזגן בבקשה.

Tadlik et ha-mazgan bevakashah.

“Turn on the air conditioner, please.” 

4. (‘מכונת כביסה (נ – washer

mekhonat kvisah

שמתי את הבגדים המלוכלכים שלי במכונת הכביסה.

Samti et ha-bgadim ha-melukhlakhim sheli be-mekhonat ha-kvisah.

“I put my dirty clothes in the washer.”

*Note that this is a compound noun, and uses the construct state with מכונה (mikhonah) changing to מכונת (mikhonat).

5. (‘מאוורר (ז – fan

me’avrer

אתה תחסוך אנרגיה אם תדליק את המאוורר ותכבה את המזגן.

Atah tach’sokh energyah im tadlik et ha-me’avrer ve-tekhabeh et ha-mazgan.

“You’ll save energy if you turn on the fan and turn off the air conditioner.”

6. (‘מיקרוגל (ז – microwave

mikrogal

השימוש במיקרוגל אינו נחשב בריא.

Ha-shimush ba-mikrogal eyno nechshav bari.

“It’s considered unhealthy to use the microwave.”

7. (‘כיריים (ז – stove

kira’yim

אני מנקה את הכיריים עם מסיר שומנים.

Ani menakeh et ha-kira’yim im mesir shumanim.

“I clean the stove with degreaser.”

*Note that this noun uses the dual form, and any verbs or adjectives used must be conjugated accordingly.

8. (‘נגן די.וי.די (ז – DVD player

nagan dividi

בא לי לראות סרט בדי.וי.די.

Ba li lirot seret ba-dividi.

“I feel like watching a movie on the DVD player.”

*Note that this is a compound noun, and uses the construct state.

2. Nouns in Hebrew: Technology

Nouns 2

Another important category for learning nouns in Hebrew is technology. A ubiquitous part of our lives these days, you can hardly have an interaction that doesn’t involve the Internet, your cell phone, or a computer. So let’s take a look at some basic technology nouns with examples of use.

9. (‘מחשב (ז – computer

machshev

זה המחשב החדש שלי.

Zeh ha-machshev ha-chadash sheli.

“This is my new computer.” 

10. (מחשב נייד (זי – laptop

machshev nayad

יש לך מחשב נייד או נייח?

Yesh lekha machshev nayad o nayach?

“Do you have a laptop or a desktop computer?”

11. (טאבלט (זי – tablet

tablet

הטאבלט שלך ממש מגניב!

Ha-tablet shelkha mamash magniv!

“Your tablet is really cool!”

12. (פלאפון (זי – cell phone

pelefon

תתקשר אליי לפלאפון מאוחר יותר.

Titkasher elay la-pelefon meuchar yoter.

“Call me on my cell phone later.”

13. (אנזיות (ני – headphones

ozniyot

אני אוהב להקשיב למוזיקה עם אוזניות.

Ani ohev lehakshiv le-muzika im ozniyot.

“I like to listen to music with headphones.”

14. (מטען (זי – charger

mat’en

ראית את המטען לפלאפון שלי?

Raita et ha-mat’en la-pelefon sheli?

“Have you seen my cell phone charger?”

15. (וויי-פיי (זי – WiFi

wayfay

מה הסיסמה לוויי-פיי בבקשה?

Mah ha-sismah la-wayfay be-vakashah?

“What is the WiFi password, please?”

16. (תוכנה (ני – app

tokhnah

הורדתי תוכנה מצויינת לניווט בדרכים.

Horadeti tokhnah metzuyenet le-nivut ba-drakhim.

“I downloaded a great app for on-the-road navigation.”

17. (אתר אינטרנט (זי – website

atar internet

יש לחברה שלך אתר אינטרנט?

Yesh la-chevrah shelkha atar internet?

“Does your company have a website?”

*Note that this is a compound noun, and uses the construct state.

18. (תמונה (ני – picture

tmunah

בא לכם לראות תמונות מהטיול שלי?

Ba lakhem lir’ot tmunot me-ha-tiyul sheli?

“Do you feel like seeing some pictures from my trip?”

19. (קובץ (זי – file

kovetz

איפה שמרת את הקובץ עם שיעורי הבית שלי?

Eyfoh shamarta et ha-kovetz im shi’urey ha-bayit sheli?

“Where did you save the file with my homework?”

20. (חשבון (זי – account

cheshbon

יש לך חשבון סקייפ?

Yesh lekha cheshbon skayp?

“Do you have a Skype account?”

*Note that this is an irregular noun. Even though חשבון is masculine, the plural form is חשבונות.

3. Nouns in Hebrew: Transportation

Bus on the road

Another important category where we’ll definitely want some nouns in our lexicon is transportation. Getting from point A to point B can sometimes be a struggle in any language, but we certainly won’t get far without some basic words to get us started. So let’s have a look!

21. (מטוס (זי – airplane

matos

טסת פעם במוס?

Tasta pa’am be-matos?

“Have you ever been on an airplane?”

21. (רכבת (ני – train

rakevet

הרכבת לתל אביב יוצאת בעוד חמש דקות.

Ha-rakevet le-Tel Aviv yotzeyt be-od chamesh dakot.

“The train to Tel Aviv leaves in five minutes.”

22. (רכבת תחתית (ני – subway

rakevet tachtit

הרכבת התחתית בניו יורק היא מבוך.

Ha-rakevet ha-tachtit be-Nu York hi mavokh.

“The subway in New York is a maze.”

23. (אוטובוס (זי – bus

otobus

אתה יודע מאיפה יוצא האוטובוס לכיוון דרום?

Ata yode’a me-eyfoh yotze ha-otobus le’kivun darom?

“Do you know where the southbound bus leaves from?”

24. (מונית (ני – taxi

monit

ניקח מונית לתאטרון כדי להגיע מהר יותר.

Nikach monit la-te’atron kedey lehagia maher yoter.

“Let’s take a taxi to the theater to get there faster.”

25. (אופניים (זי – bicycle

ofanayim

אתה אוהב לרכב על אופניים?

Ata ohev lirkav al ofanayim?

“Do you like riding a bicycle?”

26. (שדה תעופה (זי – airport

sdey tiufah

אני ממש לא סובל את התורים בשדה התעופה.

Ani mamash lo sovel et ha torim bi-sde ha-teufah.

“I really can’t stand the lines at the airport.”

*Note that this is a compound noun, and uses the construct state with שָׂדֶה (sadeh) changing to שְׂדֵה (sdey).

27. (תחנת רכבת (ני – train station

tachanat rakevet

נקנה כרטיסים בתחנת הרכבת.

Nikneh kartisim be-tachanat ha-rakevet.

“We’ll buy tickets at the train station.”

*Note that this is a compound noun, and uses the construct state with תחנה (tachanah) changing to תחנת (tachanat).

27. (תחנת אוטובוס (ני – bus station

tachanat otobus

חכה לי בתחנת האוטובוס ליד הבית.

Chakeh li be-tachanat ha-otobus le-yad ha-bayit.

“Wait for me at the bus station near the house.”

*Note that this is a compound noun, and uses the construct state with תחנה (tachanah) changing to תחנת (tachanat).

28. (רמזור (זי – traffic light

ramzor

השוטר אמר שעברת ברמזור אדום.

Ha-shoter amar she-avarta be-ramzor adom.

“The police officer said you ran through a red traffic light.”

29. (צומת (זי – intersection

tzomet

פנה ימינה בצומת הבא.

Pneh yeminah ba-tzomet haba.

“Turn right at the next intersection.”

4. Nouns in Hebrew: Restaurants

Couple at a restaurant table

Another useful category of nouns in Hebrew are words we might use at a restaurant. We all love to eat, and Israelis love to eat more than just about anything. So let’s check out some restaurant-related nouns to get us working up an appetite!

30. (שולחן (זי – table

shulchan

שולחן לשניים?

Shulchan li-shnayim?

“Table for two?”

*Note that this is an irregular noun. Even though שולחן is masculine, the plural form is שולחנות.

31. (תפריט (זי – menu

tafrit

התפריט הזה ממש אקזוטי!

Ha-tafrit ha-zeh mamash ekzoti!

“This menu is quite exotic!”

32. מלצר (זי) / מלצרית – waiter / waitress

meltzar / meltzarit

המלצר ייקח את ההזמנה שלכם בעוד רגע.

Ha-meltzar yikach et ha-hazmanah shelakhem be’od rega.

“The waiter will take your order in just a moment.”

*Note the masculine form מלצר and the feminine form מלצרית, remembering to conjugate verbs and use masculine/feminine adjectives accordingly!

33. (חשבון (זי – bill

cheshbon

אני רוצה לשלם את החשבון עם כרטיס אשראי.

Ani rotzeh leshalem et ha-cheshbon im cartis ashray.

“I would like to pay the bill with a credit card.”

*Note that this is an irregular noun. Even though חשבון is masculine, the plural form is חשבונות.

34. (מזלג (זי – fork

mazleg

סכו”ם הם ראשי תיבות של סכין, כף ומזלג.

SACUM zeh rashey teyvot shel sakin, kaf ve-mazleg.

“Silverware [SACUM in Hebrew] is an acronym for knife, spoon, and fork.”

35. (‘סכין (זי/נ – knife

sakin

סכו”ם הם ראשי תיבות של סכין, כף ומזלג.

SACUM zeh rashey teyvot shel sakin, kaf ve-mazleg.

“Silverware [SACUM in Hebrew] is an acronym for knife, spoon, and fork.”

*Note that סכין is an irregular noun in that it can be masculine or feminine.

36. (‘כף (נ – spoon

kaf

סכו”ם הם ראשי תיבות של סכין, כף ומזלג.

SACUM zeh rashey teyvot shel sakin, kaf ve-mazleg.

“Silverware [SACUM in Hebrew] is an acronym for knife, spoon, and fork.”

37. (‘צלחת (נ – plate

tzalachat

תיזהר, הצלחת חמה!

Tizaher, ha-tzalachat chamah!

“Careful, the plate is hot!”

38. (‘קערה (נ – bowl

kiarah

בפסח אנחנו משתמשים בקערה מיוחדת לסדר.

Be-Pesach anachnu mishtamshim be-tzalachat meyuchedet la-Seder.

“On Passover, we use a special bowl for the Seder.”

39. (‘כוס (נ – cup

kos

אפשר עוד כוס מיץ?

Efshar od cos mitz?

“Could I have another cup of juice?”

*Note that כוס is feminine, with the plural form כוסות.

40. (‘מים (ז – water

mayim

אנה צמא בגלל שלא שתיתי מספיק מים היום.

Ani tzameh biglal she-lo shatiti maspik mayim hayom.

“I’m thirsty because I didn’t drink enough water today.”

*Note that מים is always plural in Hebrew. No singular form exists for this noun.

41. (‘תה (ז – tea

teh

אין כמו תה קר ביום חם!

Eyn kmo teh kar be-yom cham!

“There’s nothing like iced tea on a hot day!”

5. Nouns in Hebrew: School Essentials

Nouns 3

Yet another category of nouns in Hebrew that we might need are school essentials. Whether we’re taking Hebrew classes at university or sending our kids to Hebrew school, here are some useful nouns to navigate the school world.

42. (‘אוניברסיטה (נ – college

universitah

איזה מקצוע אתה מתכוון ללמוד באוניברסיטה?

Eyzeh miktzoa ata mitkaven lilmod ba-universitah?

“What are you going to major in at college?”

43. (‘תיכון (ז – high school

tikhon

באיזה תיכון אתה לומד?

Be-eyzeh tikhon ata lomed?

“Which high school do you attend?”

44. (‘חטיבת ביניים (נ – middle school

chativat beynayim

יש לי שני בנים בחטיבת הביניים.

Yesh li shney banim be-chativat ha-beynayim.

“I have two sons in middle school.”

*Note that this is a compound noun, and uses the construct state with חטיבה (chativah) changing to חטיבת (chativat).

45. (‘יסודי (ז – elementary school

yesodi

יש לי שתי בנות ביסודי.

Yesh li shtey banot ba-yesodi.

“I have two daughters in elementary school.”

46. (‘ספר (ז – book

seyfer

בסופי שבוע אני אוהב לקרוא ספרים.

Be-sofey shavua ani ohev likro sfarim.

“On weekends, I like to read books.”

47. (‘תרמיל (ז – backpack

tarmil

אל תשכח את הילקוט שלך בבית הספר.

Al tishkach et ha-yalkut shelkha be-veyt ha-seyfer.

“Don’t forget your backpack at school.”

48. (‘עט (ז – pen

eyt

עדיף לכתוב בעט או בעיפרון?

Adif likhtov be-et o be-iparon?

“Is it better to write in pen or pencil?”

49. (‘מוֹרֶה (ז’) / מוֹרָה (נ – teacher

moreh / morah

מי המורה שלך לפיזיקה?

Mi ha-moreh shelkha le-fizikah?

“Who’s your physics teacher?”

*Note the masculine form מוֹרֶה and the feminine form מוֹרָה, remembering to conjugate verbs and use masculine/feminine adjectives accordingly!

50. (‘תלמיד (ז’) / תלמידה (נ – student (in elementary through high school)

talmid / talmidah

יש הרבה תלמידים בכיתה שלי.

Yesh harbe talmidim ba-kitah sheli.

“There are a lot of students in my class.”

*Note the masculine form תלמיד and the feminine form תלמידה, remembering to conjugate verbs and use masculine/feminine adjectives accordingly!

51. (‘סטודנט (ז’) / סטודנטית (נ – student (at university)

student / studentit

אחותי סטודנטית לרפואה.

Achoti studentit le-refuah.

“My sister is a medical student.”

*Note the masculine form סטודנט and the feminine form סטודנטית, remembering to conjugate verbs and use masculine/feminine adjectives accordingly!

52. (‘מבחן (ז – exam

mivchan

יש לנו מבחן במתמטיקה ביום ראשון.

Yesh lanu mivchan be-matematikah be-yom rishon.

“We have a math exam on Sunday.”

53. (‘שיעורי בית (ז – homework

shiurey bayit

האם תוכל לעזור לי עם שיעורי הבית בכימיה?

Haim tukhal la’azor li im shiurey ha-bayit be-khimiyah?

“Could you help me with the homework for chemistry?”

*Note that this is a compound noun, and uses the construct state with שיעורים (shiurim) changing to שיעורי (shiurey).

6. Nouns in Hebrew: Occupations

Various occupations/professionals

Another helpful category of nouns in the Hebrew language are occupation and profession names. These can be useful in all sorts of daily interactions, whether we wish to describe what we do, ask someone else the same, or possibly look up a doctor to check out our sore throat after spending a chilly night in the Negev desert. 

Let’s have a look at some common occupation names in Hebrew, noting that all of these will have both masculine and feminine forms. Don’t forget to conjugate verbs and choose adjectival forms accordingly!

54. (‘רופא (זי) / רופאה (נ – doctor

rofeh / rofah

אמא שלי רופאה מיילדת.

Ima sheli rof’ah meyaledet.

“My mother is an obstetrician.” [literally, “birth doctor” in Hebrew]

55. (‘עורך דין (זי) / עורכת דין (נ – lawyer

orekh din / orekhet din

אני רוצה ללמוד משפטים ולהיות עורך דין.

Ani rotzeh lilmod mishpatim ve-lihiyot orekh din.

“I want to study law and become a lawyer.”

56. (‘אח (זי) / אחות (נ – nurse

ach / achot

חברה שלי היא אחות בבית החולים.

Chaverah sheli hi achot be-veyt ha-cholim.

“My girlfriend is a nurse at the hospital.”

57. (‘מנהל (זי) / מנהלת (נ – manager

minahel / minahelet

להיות מנהל זו אחריות רבה.

Lihiyot menahel zo achrayut raba.

“Being a manager is a lot of responsibility.”

58. (‘שף (זי) / שפית (נ – chef

shef / shefit

מאז הילדות תמיד חלמתי להיות שפית.

Me’az ha-yaldut tamid chalamti lihiyot shefit.

“I’ve dreamed of being a chef since childhood.”

59. (‘איש עסקים (זי) / אשת עסקים (נ – businessman / businesswoman

ish asakim / eyshet asakim

דוד שלי הוא איש עסקים בגרמניה.

Dod sheli hu ish asakim be-Germanyah.

“My uncle is a businessman in Germany.”

*Note that this is a compound noun, and uses the construct state with אישה (ishah) changing to אשת (eyshet) in the feminine form of the noun.

60. (‘מהנדס (זי) / מהנדסת (נ – engineer

mihandes / mihandeset

בתי הבכורה היא הנדסאית סאונד.

Biti ha-bkhorah hi handesayit saund.

“My eldest daughter is a sound engineer.”

61. (‘עובד מדינה (זי) / עובדת מדינה (נ – civil servant

oved medinah / ovedet medinah

מחר יש לי מבחן למשרה כעובד מדינה.

Machar yesh li mivchan le-misrah ke-oved medinah.

“Tomorrow I have an exam for a civil servant’s position.”

7. Nouns in Hebrew: Family Members

A very common group of nouns we’ll want to know in Hebrew are names of family members. Especially in such a family-oriented culture as Israel’s, it’s an altogether common experience to be interrogated at length regarding the members of your family—all in good humor, of course. Israelis just love talking about their family, so it’s good to familiarize yourself with the most common nouns to describe family members. Again, remember to pay attention to masculine versus feminine forms.

For more family words in Hebrew, check out our article about family members!

62. (משפחה (ני – family

mishpachah

יש לך משפחה גדולה?

Yesh le-kha mishpachah gdolah?

“Do you have a large family?”

63. (‘אמא (נ – mom

ima

אמא שלי עובדת בבנק.

Ima sheli ovedet ba-bank.

“My mom works at the bank.”

*Note that this noun has an irregular plural form of אמהות (imahot).

64. (‘אבא (ז – dad

aba

אבא שלי טייס בחיל האוויר.

Aba sheli tayas be-Chel ha-Avir.

“My dad is a pilot in the Air Force.”

*Note that this noun has an irregular plural form of אבות (avot).

65. (‘הורים (ז – parents

horim

ההורים שלי גרושים.

Ha-horim sheli grushim.

“My parents are divorced.”

66. (‘בעל (ז – husband

baal

בעלי שוטר.

Ba’ali shoter.

“My husband is a police officer.”

67. (‘אישה (נ – wife

isha

אשתי שופטת.

Ishti shofetet.

“My wife is a judge.”

68. דוד – uncle

dod

יש לי דוד בפריז.

Yesh li dos be-Pariz.

“I have an uncle in Paris.”

*Note that this noun has an irregular plural form of בנות (banot).

69. (‘בן (ז – son

ben

יש לנו שני בנים ושתי ובנות.

Yesh lanu sheny banim ve-shtey banot.

“We have two sons and two daughters.”

70. (‘בת (נ – daughter

bat

יש לנו שני בנים ושתי ובנות.

Yesh lanu sheny banim ve-shtey banot.

“We have two sons and two daughters.”

71. (‘סבים (ז – grandparents

sabim

הסבים שלי גרים בהרצליה.

Ha-sabim sheli garim be-Herzeliyah.

“My grandparents live in Herzliya.”

8. Nouns in Hebrew: Body Parts

Nouns 4

Now for the parts of the body. You can even learn these like a kid by singing or playing a song while touching the different parts of your body as you practice the names. It may sound silly, but trust us, it really works! So go play Simon Says (שמעון אומר [Shimon omer] in Hebrew) and practice the following nouns. 

Note that almost all of the body parts that are pairs use the dual form!

72. (גוף (זי – body

guf

יש לו גוף חזק.

Yesh lo guf chazak.

“He has a strong body.”

73. (ראש (זי – head

rosh

אמא אומרת שיש לי ראש טוב על הכתפיים.

Ima omeret sheyesh li rosh tov al ha-kteyfayim.

“Mom says I have a good head on my shoulders.”

74. (כתף (ני – shoulder

katef

אמא אומרת שיש לי ראש טוב על הכתפיים.

Ima omeret sheyesh li rosh tov al hakteyfayim.

“Mom says I have a good head on my shoulders.”

*Note that this noun uses the dual form, and any verbs or adjectives used must be conjugated accordingly.

75. (יד (ני – arm/hand

yad

אני עושה הרבה כושר כדי לחזק את הידיים.

Ani oseh harbe kosher kedey lechazek et ha-yadayim.

“I do a lot of exercises to strengthen my arms.”

*Note that this noun uses the dual form, and any verbs or adjectives used must be conjugated accordingly.

76. (רגל (ני – leg/foot

regel

לאצן יש רגליים חזקות.

La-atzan yesh raglayim chazakot.

“The runner has strong legs.”

*Note that this noun uses the dual form, and any verbs or adjectives used must be conjugated accordingly.

77. (חזה (זי – chest

chazeh

התינוק שלי אוהב להיות צמוד לחזה שלי.

Ha-tinok sheli ohev lihiyot tzamud la-chazeh sheli.

“My baby likes to be close up against my chest.”

*Note that this is an irregular noun. Even though חזה is masculine, the plural form is חזות (chazot).

78. (בטן (ני – abdomen

beten

לא כדאי לשתות על בטן ריקה.

Lo keday lishtot al beten reykah.

“It’s not a good idea to drink on an empty stomach.”

*Note that this is an irregular noun. Even though בטן is feminine, the plural form is בטנים (bitanim).

79. (פנים (ני – face

panim

איזה פנים יפות!

Eyzeh panim yafot.

“What a beautiful face!”

*Note that פנים is always plural in Hebrew. No singular form exists for this noun.

80. (עין (ני – eye

ayin

באיזה צבע העניניים שלך?

Be-eyzeh tzeva ha-eynayim sehlkha?

“What color are your eyes?”

*Note that this noun uses the dual form, and any verbs or adjectives used must be conjugated accordingly.

81. (אף (זי – nose

af

יש לי נזלת באף.

Yesh li nazelet ba’af.

“I have a runny nose.”

82. (פה (זי – mouth

peh

יש לה פה גדול אבל לב עוד יותר גדול.

Yesh lah peh gadol aval lev od yoter gadol.

“She has a big mouth but a bigger heart.”

*Note that this noun has an irregular plural form of פיות (piyot).

83. (אוזן (ני – ear

ozen

תפתח את האוזניים שלך ותקשיב!

Tiftach et ha-oznayim shelkha ve-takshiv!

“Open your ears and listen!”

*Note that this noun uses the dual form, and any verbs or adjectives used must be conjugated accordingly.

9. Nouns in Hebrew: Time

Clock showing time

Our last category for today are nouns related to time. No basic vocabulary would be complete without the words you need to give and ask the time, of course! So without further ado, let’s save you some time and get right to it! Note that a number of these nouns use the dual form!

84. (היום (זי – today

hayom

היום זה האתמול של המחר.

Hayom zeh ha-etmol shel ha-machar.

“Today is tomorrow’s yesterday.”

85. (מחר (זי – tomorrow

hayom

היום זה האתמול של המחר.

Hayom zeh ha-etmol shel ha-machar.

“Today is tomorrow’s yesterday.”

86. (אתמול (זי – yesterday

etmol

היום זה האתמול של המחר.

Hayom zeh ha-etmol shel ha-machar.

“Today is tomorrow’s yesterday.”

87. (יום ראשון (זי – Sunday

yom rishon

בישראל חוזרים לעבודה ביום ראשון.

Be-Yisrael chozrim la’avoda Be-yom rishon.

“In Israel, people go back to work on Sunday.”

88. (יום שני (זי – Monday

yom sheyni

ביום שני ניסע לים.

Be-yom sheyni nisa la-yam.

“On Monday, we’re going to the beach.”

89. (יום שלישי (זי – Tuesday

yom shlishi

יום שלישי זה היום הכי קשה בשבוע.

Yom shlishi zeh ha-yom hakhi kasheh ba-shavua.

“Tuesday is the hardest day of the week.”

90. (יום רביעי (זי – Wednesday

yom revi’i

יום רביעי הוא מצע השבוע.

Yom revi’i hu emtza ha-shavua.

“Wednesday is the middle of the week.”

91. (יום חמישי (זי – Thursday

yom chamishi

ביום חמישי בערב נצא למסעדה.

Be-yom chamishi ba-erev netze le-mis’adah.

“On Thursday evening, we’ll go out to eat at a restaurant.”

92. (יום שישי (זי – Friday

yom shishi

יום שישי הוא ערב שבת.

Yom shishi hu erev Shabat.

“Friday is Sabbath Eve.”

93. (שבת (זי – Saturday

shabat

שבת הוא יום מנוחה.

Shabat hu yom menuchah.

“Saturday is a day of rest.”

94. (יום (זי – day

yom

יום אחד נתחתן.

Yom echad nitchaten.

“One day we’ll get married.”

95. (יומיים (ני – two days

yomayim

עוד יומיים יום ההולדת שלי.

Od yomayim yom ha-huledet sheli.

“In two days, it’s my birthday.”

*Note that this noun uses the dual form, and any verbs or adjectives used must be conjugated accordingly.

96. (שבוע (זי – week

shavua

יום רביעי הוא אמצע השבוע.

Yom revi’i hu emtza ha-shavua.

“Wednesday is the middle of the week.”

*Note that this is an irregular noun. Even though שבוע is masculine, the plural form is שבועות (shavuot).

97. (שנה (ני – year

shanah

השנה אני מסיים את הלימודים בתיכון.

Ha-shanah ani mesayem et ha-limudim batikhon.

“This year, I’ll finish my studies at high school.”

*Note that this is an irregular noun. Even though שנה is masculine, the plural form is שנים (shanim).

98. (שעה (ני – hour

sha’ah

בעוד שעה נהיה כבר בבית.

Be-od sha’ah nihiye kvar ba-bayit.

“In an hour, we’ll be home already.”

99. (שעתיים (ני – two hours

sha’atayim

רצתי שעתיים בטיילת.

Ratzti sha’atayim ba-tayelet.

“I ran on the boardwalk for two hours.”

*Note that this noun uses the dual form, and any verbs or adjectives used must be conjugated accordingly.

100. (דקה (ני – minute

dakah

תן לי דקה לחפש את התיק שלי.

Ten li dakah lechapes et ha-tik sheli.

“Give me a minute to look for my bag.”

10. Conclusion: Nouns are a Great Place to Start!

So there you have it! One-hundred basic nouns that, if practiced, will get you a pretty long way! Whether going out on a date with an exchange student or visiting family in Israel, the list above—while by no means comprehensive—is an excellent start to be able to hold a brief conversation. And, by practicing the different forms—masculine, feminine, singular, plural, dual—you’ll be more comfortable as you expand your vocabulary. 

For now, don’t worry about the grammar too much, just focus on good pronunciation and trying your best to remember which nouns are masculine and which are feminine. But even if you don’t, don’t fret, as Israelis know how hard it is to learn Hebrew nouns, and most will gladly help you out when you make a mistake! Remember, just like babies, take it one word at a time. You should relax and do the same! Every word learned is a huge step.

Before you go, let us know in the comments if you learned any new words! Are there any nouns you want to know the Hebrew word for that we haven’t covered here? We look forward to hearing from you! 

We hope you’ve enjoyed this lesson, and that you go out there and get talking! Shalom!

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Essential Vocabulary for Life Events in Hebrew

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What is the most defining moment you will face this year? From memories that you immortalize in a million photographs, to days you never wish to remember, one thing’s for certain: big life events change you. The great poet, Bukowski, said, “We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well, that death will tremble to take us.” The older I get, the more I agree with him!

Talking about significant events in our lives is part of every person’s journey, regardless of creed or culture. If you’re planning to stay in Israel for more than a quick visit, you’re sure to need at least a few ‘life events’ phrases that you can use. After all, many of these are shared experiences, and it’s generally expected that we will show up with good manners and warm wishes.

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Table of Contents

  1. Life Events
  2. Marriage Proposal Lines
  3. Talking About Age
  4. Conclusion

1. Life Events

Do you know how to say “Happy New Year” in Hebrew? Well, the New Year is a pretty big deal that the whole world is in on! We celebrate until midnight, make mindful resolutions, and fill the night sky with the same happy words in hundreds of languages. No doubt, then, that you’ll want to know how to say it like a local!

Big life events are not all about fun times, though. Real life happens even when you’re traveling, and certain terminology will be very helpful to know. From talking about your new job to wishing your neighbors “Merry Christmas” in Hebrew, here at HebrewPod101, we’ve put together just the right vocabulary and phrases for you.

1- Birthday – יום הולדת (yom huledet)

If you’re like me, any excuse to bring out a pen and scribble a note is a good one. When there’s a birthday, even better: hello, handwriting!

Your Israeli friend will love hearing you wish them a “Happy birthday” in Hebrew, but how much more will they appreciate a thoughtful written message? Whether you write it on their Facebook wall or buy a cute card, your effort in Hebrew is sure to get them smiling! Write it like this:

ברכות ליום הולדתך (berakhot leyom huladetkha)

Older Woman Blowing Out Candles on a Birthday Cake Surrounded by Friends.

Now that you know the words, I challenge you to put them to music and sing your own “Happy birthday” song in Hebrew! It’s not impossible to figure out even more lyrics, once you start discovering the language from scratch.

2- Buy – קנה (kanah)

If there’s a special occasion, you might want to buy somebody a gift. As long as you’ve checked out Hebrew etiquette on gift-giving (do a Google search for this!), it will be a lovely gesture. If you’re not sure what to buy, how about the awesome and universally-appealing gift of language? That’s a gift that won’t stop giving!

Two Women at a Counter in a Bookstore, One Buying a Book

3- Retire – לפרוש (lif’rosh)

If you’re planning to expand your mind and retire in Israel, you can use this word to tell people why you seem to be on a perpetual vacation!

Retirement is also a great time to learn a new language, don’t you think? And you don’t have to do it alone! These days it’s possible to connect to a vibrant learning community at the click of a button. The added benefit of a Daily Dose of Language is that it keeps your brain cells alive and curious about the world. After all, it’s never too late to realize those long-ignored dreams of traveling the globe…

4- Graduation – סיום (siyum)

When attending a graduation ceremony in Israel, be prepared for a lot of formal language! It will be a great opportunity to listen carefully and see if you can pick up differences from the everyday Hebrew you hear.

Lecturer or University Dean Congratulating and Handing Over Graduation Certificate to a Young Man on Graduation Day.

5- Promotion – קידום (kidum)

Next to vacation time, receiving a promotion is the one career highlight almost everyone looks forward to. And why wouldn’t you? Sure, it means more responsibility, but it also means more money and benefits and – the part I love most – a change of scenery! Even something as simple as looking out a new office window would boost my mood.

6- Anniversary – יום השנה (yom hashana)

Some anniversaries we anticipate with excitement, others with apprehension. They are days marking significant events in our lives that can be shared with just one person, or with a whole nation. Whether it’s a special day for you and a loved one, or for someone else you know, this word is crucial to know if you want to wish them a happy anniversary in Hebrew.

7- Funeral – הלוויה (halvaya)

We tend to be uncomfortable talking about funerals in the west, but it’s an important conversation for families to have. Around the world, there are many different customs and rituals for saying goodbye to deceased loved ones – some vastly different to our own. When traveling in Israel, if you happen to find yourself the unwitting observer of a funeral, take a quiet moment to appreciate the cultural ethos; even this can be an enriching experience for you.

8- Travel – לטייל (letayel)

Travel – my favorite thing to do! Everything about the experience is thrilling and the best cure for boredom, depression, and uncertainty about your future. You will surely be forever changed, fellow traveler! But you already know this, don’t you? Well, now that you’re on the road to total Hebrew immersion, I hope you’ve downloaded our IOS apps and have your Nook Book handy to keep yourself entertained on those long bus rides.

Young Female Tourist with a Backpack Taking a Photo of the Arc de Triomphe

9- Graduate – לסיים (lesayem)

If you have yet to graduate from university, will you be job-hunting in Israel afterward? Forward-looking companies sometimes recruit talented students who are still in their final year. Of course, you could also do your final year abroad as an international student – an amazing experience if you’d love to be intellectually challenged and make a rainbow of foreign friends!

10- Wedding – חתונה (kha’tuna)

One of the most-loved traditions that humans have thought up, which you’ll encounter anywhere in the world, is a wedding. With all that romance in the air and months spent on preparations, a wedding is typically a feel-good affair. Two people pledge their eternal love to each other, ladies cry, single men look around for potential partners, and everybody has a happy day of merrymaking.

Ah, but how diverse we are in our expression of love! You will find more wedding traditions around the world than you can possibly imagine. From reciting love quotes to marrying a tree, the options leave no excuse to be boring!

Married Couple During Reception, Sitting at Their Table While a Young Man Gives a Wedding Speech

11- Move – עבר (avar)

I love Israel, but I’m a nomad and tend to move around a lot, even within one country. What are the biggest emotions you typically feel when moving house? The experts say moving is a highly stressful event, but I think that depends on the circumstances. Transitional periods in our lives are physically and mentally demanding, but changing your environment is also an exciting adventure that promises new tomorrows!

12- Be born – נולד (nolad)

I was not born in 1993, nor was I born in Asia. I was born in the same year as Aishwarya Rai, Akon, and Monica Lewinsky, and on the same continent as Freddy Mercury. When and where were you born? More importantly – can you say it in Hebrew?

13- Get a job – למצוא עבודה (lim’tso avoda)

The thought of looking for a job in a new country can be daunting, but English speakers are in great demand in Israel – you just have to do some research, make a few friends and get out there! Also, arming yourself with a few Hebrew introductions that you can both say and write will give you a confidence boost. For example, can you write your name in Hebrew?

Group of People in Gear that Represent a Number of Occupations.

14- Die – למות (lamut)

Death is a universal experience and the final curtain on all other life events. How important is it, then, to fully live before we die? If all you have is a passport, a bucket list, and a willingness to learn some lingo, you can manifest those dreams!

15- Home – בית (bayit)

If home is where the heart is, then my home is on a jungle island completely surrounded by the turquoise ocean. Right now, though, home is an isolation room with a view of half a dry palm tree and a tangle of telephone wires.

If you’re traveling to Israel for an extended stay, you’ll soon be moving into a new home quite unlike anything you’ve experienced before!

Large, Double-Story House with Lit Windows.

16- Job – עבודה (avoda)

What job do you do? Does it allow you much time for travel, or for working on this fascinating language that has (so rightfully) grabbed your attention? Whatever your job, you are no doubt contributing to society in a unique way. If you’re doing what you love, you’re already on the road to your dream. If not, just remember that every single task is one more skill to add to your arsenal. With that attitude, your dream job is coming!

17- Birth – לידה (leida)

Random question: do you know the birth rate of Israel?

If you’re lucky enough to be invited to see a friend’s baby just after they are born, you’ll have all my respect and all my envy. There is nothing cuter! Depending on which part of the country you’re in, you may find yourself bearing witness to some pretty unexpected birth customs. Enjoy this privilege!

Crying Newborn Baby Held By a Doctor or Nurse in a Hospital Theatre

18- Engaged – התארס (hit’ares)

EE Cummings said, “Lovers alone wear sunlight,” and I think that’s most true at the moment she says “yes.” Getting engaged is something young girls dream of with stars in their eyes, and it truly is a magical experience – from the proposal, to wearing an engagement ring, to the big reveal!

In the world of Instagram, there’s no end to the antics as imaginative couples try more and more outrageous ways to share their engagement with the world. I love an airport flashmob, myself, but I’d rather be proposed to on a secluded beach – salt, sand, and all!

Engagement customs around the world vary greatly, and Israel is no exception when it comes to interesting traditions. Learning their unique romantic ways will inspire you for when your turn comes.

Speaking of romance, do you know how to say “Happy Valentine’s Day” in Hebrew?

19- Marry – התחתן (hit’khaten)

The one you marry will be the gem on a shore full of pebbles. They will be the one who truly mirrors your affection, shares your visions for the future, and wants all of you – the good, the bad and the inexplicable.

From thinking up a one-of-a-kind wedding, to having children, to growing old together, finding a twin flame to share life with is quite an accomplishment! Speaking of which…

2. Marriage Proposal Lines

Marriage Proposal Lines

Ah, that heart-stopping moment when your true love gets down on one knee to ask for your hand in marriage, breathlessly hoping that you’ll say “Yes!” If you haven’t experienced that – well, it feels pretty darn good, is all I can say! If you’re the one doing the asking, though, you’ve probably had weeks of insomnia agonizing over the perfect time, location and words to use.

Man on His Knee Proposing to a Woman on a Bridge.

How much more care should be taken if your love is from a different culture to yours? Well, by now you know her so well, that most of it should be easy to figure out. As long as you’ve considered her personal commitment to tradition, all you really need is a few words from the heart. Are you brave enough to say them in Hebrew?

3. Talking About Age

Talking about Age

Part of the wonder of learning a new language is having the ability to strike up simple conversations with strangers. Asking about age in this context feels natural, as your intention is to practice friendly phrases – just be mindful of their point of view!

When I was 22, I loved being asked my age. Nowadays, if someone asks, I say, “Well, I’ve just started my fifth cat life.” Let them ponder that for a while.

In Israel, it’s generally not desirable to ask an older woman her age for no good reason, but chatting about age with your peers is perfectly normal. Besides, you have to mention your birthday if you want to be thrown a birthday party!

4. Conclusion

Well, there you have it! With so many great new Hebrew phrases to wish people with, can you think of someone who has a big event coming up? If you want to get even more creative, HebrewPod101 has much to inspire you with – come and check it out! Here’s just some of what we have on offer at HebrewPod101:

  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Hebrew with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account – for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Hebrew dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about HebrewPod101…!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Hebrew teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to – what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Hebrew word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Hebrew level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in HebrewPod101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Hebrew.

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Talk About the Weather in Hebrew Like a Native

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Did you know that every minute of the day, one billion tons of rain falls on the earth? Hard to believe, considering the climate crisis! Of course, all that rain is not equally shared across the planet.

So, would you mention this fascinating fact to your new Israeli acquaintance? Well, small talk about local weather is actually a great conversation-starter. Everyone cares about the weather and you’re sure to hear a few interesting opinions! Seasons can be quite unpredictable these days and nobody knows the peculiarities of a region better than the locals.

HebrewPod101 will equip you with all the weather vocabulary you need to plan your next adventure. The weather can even be an important discussion that influences your adventure plans. After all, you wouldn’t want to get caught on an inflatable boat with a two-horsepower motor in Hurricane Horrendous!

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Table of Contents

  1. Talking about the weather in Israel
  2. Words for the first day of spring
  3. Do You Know the Essential Summer Vocabulary?
  4. Must-Know Autumn vocabulary
  5. Winter
  6. HebrewPod101 can prepare you for any season.

1. Talking about the weather in Israel

Talking About Weather

If you’re like me, your day’s activity plan is likely to begin with a strong local coffee and a chat about what the sky is doing. After all, being prepared could be the difference between an amazing day and a miserable one! Luckily, it’s not difficult to comment on Israeli weather – just start with these simple words and phrases.

1- Rain – גשם (geshem)

Watercolor artists, take out your paints! You might not be able to venture out on foot today, but just embrace the rain as part of your Israeli experience. When the rain stops, the air will be clean and colours vibrant.

2- The snow has covered everything – השלג כיסה את הכל (Ha’sheleg kisa et ha-kol).

A fresh blanket of snow is irresistibly beautiful. Pull on your boots and beanie, and leave your tracks in this foreign landscape. Don’t resist the urge to build a snowman – you need this!

3- Fluffy cloud – ענן צמרירי (anan tsam’riri)

When you’re waiting for a warm beach day, fluffy white clouds in a blue sky are a good sign. Don’t forget your sunscreen, as clouds will intensify the UV rays hitting your skin.

Fluffy White Cloud in Clear Blue Sky

4- The water froze on the glass – המים קפאו על הזכוכית (Ha-mayim kaf-u al ha-z’khukhit).

Night temperatures can get chilly and might freeze the condensation on your windows. A good way to clear them up is with warm salt water.

5- The heavy rain could cause flash flooding – הגשם הכבד הזה יכול לגרום לשטפונות (Ha-geshem ha-kaved ha-ze yakhol lig’rom le-shit’fonot).

If you’re visiting Israel in the wet season, it’s important to stay informed when heavy rain sets in, so keep an eye on the weather radar. Avoid river activities and rather spend this time making a home-cooked meal and brushing up on your Hebrew weather words.

Heavy Rain in a Park

6- Flood – הצפה (hatzafah)

If you do get caught in a flood, your destination should no longer be ‘home’, but the nearest high ground.

7- The typhoon has hit – הטייפון היכה (Ha’tayfun hika.)

Not all countries experience typhoons, but you need to know when to prepare for one! It will be very scary if you’ve never experienced one before. Your local neighbours are the best people to advise you on where to take shelter, as they’ve been doing it for generations. Be sure to get the low-down at the first sign of rough weather!

8- Check the weather report before going sailing – בדוק את תחזית מזג האוויר לפני הליכה לשיט (B’dok et takhazit mezeg ha-avir lif’nei halikha le-sha’it).

When planning an outdoor activity, especially on a body of water, always be prepared for a change in the weather. Ask your hotel receptionist or neighbour where you can get a reliable daily weather report, and don’t forget your sweater!

Two Men on Sailboat

9- Today’s weather is sunny with occasional clouds – המזג אוויר היום הוא שמשי עם עננים מזדמנים
(Ha-mezeg avir hayom hu shim’shi im ananim miz’dam’nim).

Sunny weather is the dream when traveling in Israel! Wake up early, pack the hats and sunblock and go and experience the terrain, sights and beautiful spots. You’ll be rewarded with happy vibes all around.

10- A rainy day – יום גשום (yom gashum)

Remember when you said you’d save the Hebrew podcasts for a rainy day? Now’s that day!

11- Scenic rainbow – נוף קשת בענן (nof keshet be-anan)

The best part about the rain is that you can look forward to your first rainbow in Israel. There’s magic in that!

12- Flashes of lightning can be beautiful, but are very dangerous – הבזקי ברק יכולים להיות יפיפיים, אך הם מסוכנים ביותר (Hevzekey barak yekholim lihiyot yefeifi’im, akh hem mesukanim beyoter).

Lightning is one of the most fascinating weather phenomena you can witness without really being in danger – at least if you’re sensible and stay indoors! Did you know that lightning strikes the earth 40-50 times per second? Fortunately, not all countries experience heavy electric storms!

Electric Storm

13- 25 degrees Celsius – עשרים וחמש מעלות צלזיוס (esrim ve’kha’mesh ma’a’lot tselzius)

Asking a local what the outside temperature will be is another useful question for planning your day. It’s easy if you know the Hebrew term for ‘degrees Celsius’.

14- Fahrenheit – פרנהייט (farenhait)

Although the Fahrenheit system has been replaced by Celsius in almost all countries, it’s still used in the US and a few other places. Learn this phrase in Hebrew in case one of your companions develops a raging fever.

15- Today the sky is clear – בהיר (bahir)

Clear skies mean you’ll probably want to get the camera out and capture some nature shots – not to mention the great sunsets you’ll have later on. Twilight can lend an especially magical quality to a landscape on a clear sky day, when the light is not filtered through clouds.

Hikers on Mountain with Clear Sky

16- Light drizzle – טפטוף קל (tiftuf kal)

Days when it’s drizzling are perfect for taking in the cultural offerings of Israel. You could go to the mall and watch a Israeli film, visit museums and art galleries, explore indoor markets or even find the nearest climbing wall. Bring an umbrella!

17- Temperature – טמפרטורה (temperatura)

Because of the coronavirus, many airports are conducting temperature screening on passengers. Don’t worry though – it’s just a precaution. Your temperature might be taken with a no-touch thermometer, which measures infrared energy coming off the body.

18- Humid – לח (lach)

I love humid days, but then I’m also a water baby and I think the two go
together like summer and rain. Find a pool or a stream to cool off in – preferably in the shade!

Humidity in Tropical Forest

19- With low humidity the air feels dry – כאשר הלחות נמוכה, יש תחושה של יובש באוויר (Ka’asher ha’lakhut nemukha, yesh tkhusha shel yovesh ba-avir).

These are the best days to go walking the hills and vales. Just take at least one Israeli friend with you so you don’t get lost!

20- The wind is really strong – הרוח מאוד חזקה (haru’akh me’od khazaka).

A strong wind blows away the air pollution and is very healthy in that respect. Just avoid the mountain trails today, unless you fancy being blown across the continent like a hot air balloon.

21- It’s very windy outside – סוער בחוץ (So’er ba-khutz).

Wind! My least favourite weather condition. Of course, if you’re a kitesurfer, a windy day is what you’ve been waiting for!

Leaves and Umbrella in the Wind

22- Wet roads can ice over when the temperature falls below freezing – phrase

The roads will be dangerous in these conditions, so please don’t take chances. The ice will thaw as soon as the sun comes out, so be patient!

23- Today is very muggy – היום מאוד לח וחם (Ha-yom me’od lakh ve-kham).

Muggy days make your skin feel sticky and sap your energy. They’re particular to high humidity. Cold shower, anyone? Ice vest? Whatever it takes to feel relief from the humidity!

24- Fog – ערפל (arafel)

Not a great time to be driving, especially in unknown territory, but keep your fog lights on and drive slowly.

Fog on a Pond with Ducks

25- Hurricane – הוריקן (hurikan)

Your new Israeli friends will know the signs, so grab some food and candles and prepare for a night of staying warm and chatting about wild weather in Israel.

Palm Trees in a Hurricane

26- Big tornado – טורנדו גדול (tor’nado gadol)

If you hear these words, it will probably be obvious already that everyone is preparing for the worst! Definitely do whatever your accommodation hosts tell you to do when a tornado is expected.

27- It’s cloudy today – מעונן היום (Me’unan ha-yom).

While there won’t be any stargazing tonight, the magnificent clouds over Israel will make impressive photographs. Caption them in Hebrew to impress your friends back home!

Cloudy Weather on Beach with Beach Huts

28- Below freezing temperatures – טמפרטורות מתחת לנקודת הקיפאון (tem’peraturor mi-takhat li’nkudat ha-kipa’on)

When the temperature is below freezing, why not take an Uber and go shopping for some gorgeous Israeli winter gear?

Woman with Winter Gear in Freezing Weather

29- Wind chill is how cold it really feels outside – צינת הרוח היא הרגשת הקור האמיתית בחוץ (Tsi’nat ha’ruach hi har’gashat h’kor ha-ami’tit ba’khuts).

Wind doesn’t change the ambient temperature of the air, it just changes your body temperature, so the air will feel colder to you than it actually is. Not all your Israeli friends will know that, though, so learn this Hebrew phrase to sound really smart!

30- Water will freeze when the temperature falls below zero degrees celsius – מים קופאים כאשר הטמפרטורה יורדת מתחת לאפס מעלות צלזיוס.מים קופאים כאשר הטמפרטורה יורדת מתחת לאפס מעלות צלזיוס (Mayim kof’im ka’asher hatem’peratura yoredet mitakhat le’efes ma’a lot tsel’zius).

If you’re near a lake, frozen water is good news! Forgot your ice skates? Don’t despair – find out where you can hire some. Be cautious, though: the ice needs to be at least four inches thick for safe skating. Personally, I just slide around on frozen lakes in my boots!

Thermometer Below Freezing Point

31- Waiting to clear up – מחכה שיתבהר (mekhake she`yitbaher)

Waiting for the weather to clear up so you can go exploring is frustrating, let’s be honest. That’s why you should always travel with two things: a scintillating novel and your Hebrew Nook Book.

32- Avoid the extreme heat – מתחמק מחום כבדמתחמק מחום כבד (mit’khamek me’khom kaved)

Is the heat trying to kill you? Unless you’re a hardened heatwave hero, definitely avoid activity, stay hydrated and drink electrolytes. Loose cotton or linen garb is the way to go!

Hand Holding a Melting Ice Cream

33- Morning frost – צינת בוקר (tsi’nat bo’ker)

Frost is water vapour that has turned to ice crystals and it happens when the earth cools so much in the night, that it gets colder than the air above it. Winter is coming!

34- Rain shower – ממטר גשם (mimtar geshem)

Rain showers are typically brief downpours that drench the earth with a good drink of water.

35- In the evening it will become cloudy and cold – בערב, יהפך להיות מעונן וקר (Ba-erev, ye’hafech lihiyot me’unan ve’kar).

When I hear this on the Hebrew weather channel, I buy a bottle of wine (red, of course) and wood for the fireplace. A cold and cloudy evening needs its comforts!

Snow in the Park at Night

36- Severe thunderstorm – סופת ברקים חמורה (sufat b’rakim kha’murah)

Keep an eye on the Israeli weather maps if it looks like a big storm is coming, so you’ll be well-informed.

37- Ice has formed on the window – קרח נוצר על החלון.קרח נוצר על החלון (Ke’rakh notsar al ha-kha’lon).

You could try this phrase out on the hotel’s helpful cleaning staff, or fix the problem yourself. Just add a scoop or two of salt to a spray bottle of water – that should work!

38- Large hailstones – גושי ברד גדולים (gu’shei ba’rad g’dolim)

As a kid, I found hail crazy exciting. Not so much now – especially if I’m on the road and large hailstones start pummeling my windscreen!

Large Hailstones on a Wooden Floor

39- Rolling thunder – רעם מתגלגל (ra’am mitgal’gel)

The rumble of rolling thunder is that low-volume, ominous background sound that goes on for some time. It’s strangely exciting if you’re safely in your hotel room; it could either suddenly clear up, or escalate to a storm.

40- Sleet – גשם-שלג (geshem-sheleg)

Sleet is tiny hard pieces of ice made from a mixture of rain and melted snow that froze. It can be messy, but doesn’t cause major damage the way hail does. Pretty cool to know this word in Hebrew!

2. Words for the first day of spring

You know the feeling: your heart skips a beat when you wake up and spring has sprung! Spring will reward you with new blossoms everywhere, birdsong in the air, kittens being born in the neighborhood and lovely views when you hit the trails. Pack a picnic and ask a new Israeli friend to show you the more natural sights. Don’t forget a light sweater and a big smile. This is the perfect time to practice some Hebrew spring words!

Spring Vocabulary

3. Do You Know the Essential Summer Vocabulary?

Summer! Who doesn’t love that word? It conjures up images of blue skies, tan skin, vacations at the beach and cruising down the coast in an Alfa Romeo, sunglasses on and the breeze in your hair. Of course, in Israel there are many ways to enjoy the summer – it all depends on what you love to do. One thing’s for sure: you will have opportunities to make friends, go on picnics, sample delicious local ice-cream and maybe even learn to sing some Hebrew songs. It’s up to you! Sail into Israeli summer with this summer vocab list, and you’ll blend in with ease.

Four Adults Playing on the Beach in the Sand

4. Must-Know Autumn vocabulary

Victoria Ericksen said, “If a year was tucked inside of a clock, then autumn would be the magic hour,” and I agree. Who can resist the beauty of fall foliage coloring the Israeli landscape? Birds prepare to migrate; travelers prepare to arrive for the best weather in Israel.

The autumnal equinox marks the moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator, making day and night almost equal in length. The cool thing about this event is that the moon gets really bright – the ‘harvest moon’, as it’s traditionally known.

So, as much as the change of season brings more windy and rainy days, it also brings celebration. Whether you honor Thanksgiving, Halloween or the Moon Festival, take some time to color your vocabulary with these Hebrew autumn words.

Autumn Phrases

5. Winter

Winter is the time the natural world slows down to rest and regroup. I’m a summer girl, but there are fabulous things about winter that I really look forward to. For one, it’s the only season I get to accessorize with my gorgeous winter gloves and snug down coat!

Then, of course, there’s ice skating, holiday decorations and bonfires. As John Steinbeck said, “What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness?” Get ready for the cold season with our list of essential Winter words!

Skier Sitting in the Snow

6. HebrewPod101 can prepare you for any season.

Now that you know how to inquire and comment on the weather in Israel, you
can confidently plan your weather-ready travel itinerary. How about this for an idea: the next
time you’re sitting in a Israeli street café, try asking someone local this question:

“Do you think the weather will stay like this for a few days?” If you loved learning these cool Hebrew weather phrases with us, why not take it a step further and add to your repertoire? HebrewPod101 is here to help!

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Secret Revealed: The Best Way to Learn a Language on Your Own

Learning A Language on Your Own

Can You Really Learn Hebrew Alone?

Learning a language on your own or without traditional classroom instruction may seem quite daunting at first. What if you run into questions? How do you stay motivated and on track to achieving goals?

Don’t worry, not only is it possible to learn Hebrew or any language without traditional classroom instruction: HebrewPod101 has created the world’s most advanced and extensive online language learning system. Not only is HebrewPod101 specifically designed to help you with learning a language on your own, it’s actually faster, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom options!

Let’s look at some of the benefits of learning Hebrew or any language alone.

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Also, don’t forget to download your free cheat sheet – How to Improve Your Language Skills too!

3 Reasons to Learn a Language Alone

Learning Alone

1. Learn at Your Own Pace and On Your Schedule

In today’s fast-paced world, there just isn’t time for traditional classroom instruction. Between getting to class and studying on some professor or teacher’s schedule, traditional classroom learning is simply impossible to fit in. But when you learn Hebrew alone, you can study in bed if you like and whenever suits your schedule best, making it far easier to actually reach your goal of learning and mastering the language.

2. Learning a Language on Your Own Reduces Stress and Anxiety

Speaking in front of a class, pop quizzes, and tests are just a few of the stressors you will encounter when you learn a language in a traditional classroom setting. Specifically, these are external stressors that often derail most people’s dream of learning a new language. But when you learn Hebrew alone, there are no external stressors. Without the external stress and anxiety, it becomes much easier and more exciting to study Hebrew and reach your very own goals—all on your own!

3. Learning Hebrew Alone Helps Improve Cognitive Function and Overall Success

Learning a language on your own is indeed more challenging in some ways than being taught in a traditional classroom setting. In fact, while classroom instruction requires more rote memorization and following instructions, studying a language on your own requires more problem-solving and higher cognitive function to self-teach lessons and hit goals. So while it’s more challenging and requires higher levels of cognition, teaching yourself a language pays dividends throughout life by better preparing you for social/work opportunities that arise.

How to Learn a Language on Your Own with HebrewPod101

Learning with HebrewPod101

1. Access to the World’s Largest Collection of Hebrew Audio & Video Lessons

The best way to learn a language on your own is to study from native speaking instructors. Ideally, you want audio and/or video lessons that teach vocabulary, grammar, and provide actual Hebrew conversations and dialogue to help you with pronunciation. HebrewPod101 has hundreds of hours of HD audio and video lessons created by real Hebrew instructors and every lesson is presented by professional Hebrew actors for perfect pronunciation. Plus, all lessons can be accessed 24/7 via any mobile device with Internet access. And, if you download the PDF versions of each lesson, you can even study without Internet access once the lesson is stored on your device!

2. “Learning Paths” with Hebrew Courses Based Upon Your Exact Needs & Goals

Although HebrewPod101 has more than thousands of video and audio lessons, you need not review each and every one to learn the language. In fact, HebrewPod101 has developed a feature called “Learning Paths”. You simply tell us your goals and we will identify the best courses and study plan to help you reach them in the shortest time possible. So even though you are technically learning a language on your own, our team is always here to help and make sure you reach your goals FAST!

3. Advanced Learning Tools Reduce Learning Time and Boost Retention

When you have the right tools and Hebrew learning resources, it’s actually easy to teach yourself a language! In the past 10+ years, HebrewPod101 has developed, tested, and refined more than 20 advanced learning tools to boost retention and reduce learning time, including:

  • Spaced Repetition Flashcards
  • Line-by-Line Dialogue Breakdown
  • Review Quizzes
  • Voice Recording Tools to Help Perfect Pronunciation
  • Teacher Feedback and Comments for Each Lesson
  • Hebrew Dictionary with Pronunciation
  • Free PDF Cheat Sheets
  • And Much More!

Armed with our growing collection of advanced learning tools, it’s truly a breeze to learn Hebrew alone and reach your goals!

Conclusion

Learning a language on your own is not only possible, it’s actually easier and more beneficial for you than traditional classroom instruction. In fact, when you learn Hebrew on your own you can study at your own pace, eliminate stress, and actually increase cognitive function.

HebrewPod101 is the world’s most advanced online language learning system and a great resource to help you teach yourself a new language. With the world’s largest collection of HD audio and video lessons, more than 20 advanced learning tools, and customized “Learning Paths”, HebrewPod101 makes learning a new language easier, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom instruction.

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