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Learn How to Talk About Your Family in Hebrew

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Did you know that only some reptiles and birds don’t parent their offspring? Except for crocodiles, all reptiles (and one family of bird species called megapodes) hatch from eggs and grow up alone, without any family.

The rest of us need family if we are to survive and thrive - humans and animals alike!

At HebrewPod101, we know how important family is. Therefore, we take care to teach you all the important vocabulary and phrases pertaining to family.

Table of Contents

  1. Why Is It Important to Know Hebrew Vocabulary about Family?
  2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first
  3. How HebrewPod101 Can Help You Learn Hebrew Family Terms

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Hebrew


1. Why Is It Important to Know Hebrew Vocabulary about Family?

Lioness with Cub

Well, if you’re serious about studying any new language, then learning about the most important social unit in Israeli culture would be a crucial part of your education.

What is family, though? Strictly speaking, it’s a group of people who live together and are supposed to take care of one another. Some of them are genetically linked.

Family isn’t just about who we’re related to by blood, of course. It’s also one of the main influences in shaping every child’s life.

Family is Important for Children’s Healthy Development

Phrases Parents Say

Family is the single most important influence in a child’s life. Children depend on parents and family to protect them and provide for their needs from the day they were born.

Primary caregivers, which usually comprise parents and family, form a child’s first relationships. They are a child’s first teachers and are role models that show kids how to act and experience the world around them.

By nurturing and teaching children during their early years, families play an important role in making sure children are ready to learn when they enter school.

Families Can Take All Shapes and Sizes

However, the way families are put together is by no means standard.

Mom and Daughter

Single-parent and same-gender households have become a new norm the past few decades, and there’s no shame in this. When there is love, connection and proper care, a child can thrive anywhere.

Everyone also knows that sometimes friends can become like family and remain with us for life, because it’s all about human connection.

After all, we share many commonalities simply because we’re human, and we are programmed to connect with one another and belong to a group. This is very important for our well-being and survival.

It’s All About Feeling Connected

As John Northman, a psychologist from Buffalo, NY, told WebMD - feeling connected to others contributes to mental as well as physical health.

He pointed out that when people feel connected, they feel better physically, and they’re also less likely to feel depressed.

Couples Chatting

Or, if they do feel depressed, they’d be in a better position to get out of it when they feel they are connecting with others. This is because they would be psychologically supported too, Northman said.

There has even been some links drawn between addiction and feeling disconnected from others. According to an article in Psychology Today, research indicates that addiction is not solely a substance disorder, but also affected by people feeling insecurely attached to others.

It showed that securely attached individuals tend to feel comfortable in and enjoy life, while insecurely attached people typically struggle to fit in and connect.


2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first

So, it’s clear that for most of us, family is our entry point into connection and belonging. This is true of every culture, so in every country, family takes prominence.

For this reason, HebrewPod101 offers culturally-relevant lessons that will equip you well to understand families in Israel.

Here are some of the most important Hebrew vocabulary and quotes about family and parenting!

A) Hebrew Family Vocabulary

Let’s start with the basic vocabulary. Without this collection of words, you’ll have a hard time describing any member of your family at all.

Family Terms
Family
משפחה (mish’pakhah)
Great grandfather
סבא רבא (saba raba)
Mother
אמא (ima)
Grandmother
סבתא (savta)
Father
אב (av)
Grandfather
סבא (saba)
Wife
אישה (isha)
Grandchild
נכד (nekhed)
Husband
בעל (ba’al)
Granddaughter
נכדה (nekhdah)
Parent
הורה (hore)
Grandson
נכד (nekhed)
Child
ילד (yeled)
Aunt
דודה (doda)
Daughter
בת (bat)
Uncle
דוד (dod)
Sister
אחות (akhot)
Niece
אחיינית (akhyanit)
Brother
אח (aħ)
Nephew
אחיין (aħyan)
Younger sister
אחות צעירה (achot tze’ira)
Younger brother
אח צעיר (akh tza’ir)
Older brother
אח גדול (aħ gadol)
Great grandmother
סבתא רבתא (savta rabta)
Cousin
בן דוד (ben dod)
Mother-in-law
חמות (ħamot)
Father-in-law
חם (ħam)
Sister-in-law
גיסה (gisa)
Brother-in-law
גיס (gis)
Partner
בת זוג (bat-zug)

Family of Three

B) Quotes About Family

Hebrew Family Quotes

One of the ways to improve your Hebrew language skills is by memorizing quotes from books, or poems.

Either source some from Hebrew literature, or make use of ours!

אתה לא בוחר את המשפחה שלך. הם מתנת האל לך, כמו שאתה להם.

ata lo bokher et ha`mishpakha shelkha. hem matnat ha`el lekha, kmo she`ata lahem.
“You don’t choose your family. They are God’s gift to you, as you are to them.” - Desmond Tutu

משפחה היא לא דבר חשוב. היא הכל.

mishpakha hi lo davar khashuv. hi hakol.
“Family is not an important thing. It’s everything.” - Michael J. Fox

משפחה זה אומר שאף אחד לא נשאר מאחור או נשכח.

mishpakha ze omer she`af ekhad lo nish-ar meakhor o nishkakh.
“Family means no one gets left behind or forgotten.” - David Ogden Stiers

המשפחה שלי היא הכוח שלי והחולשה שלי.

ha`mishpakha sheli hi ha`koakh sheli veha`khulsha sheli.
“My family is my strength and my weakness.” - Aishwarya Rai

המשפחה היא אחת מיצירות המופת של הטבע.

ha`mishpakha hi akhat mi`yetsirot ha`mofet shel ha`teva.
“The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.” - George Santayana

כשצרות מגיעות, זו המשפחה שלך שתומכת בך.

kshe`tsarot megi-ot, zu ha`mishpakha shelkha she`tomekhet bekha.
“When trouble comes, it’s your family that supports you.” - Guy Lafleur

המשפחה היא התא החיוני הראשון של החברה האנושית.

ha`mishpakha hi hata ha`khiyuni ha`rishon shel ha`khevra ha`enoshit.
“The family is the first essential cell of human society.” - Pope John XXIII

אין דבר כזה כיף לכל המשפחה.

ein davar kaza kef le`kol ha`mishpakha.
“There is no such thing as fun for the whole family.” - Jerry Seinfeld

אתה צריך להגן על הכבוד שלך. ועל המשפחה שלך.

ata tsarikh lehagen al ha`kavod shelkha. ve`al ha`mishpakha shelkha.
“You have to defend your honor. And your family.” - Suzanne Vega

כל המשפחות המאושרות דומות, כל משפחה אומללה היא אומללה בדרכה שלה.

kol ha`mishpakhot ha`meusharot domot, kol mishpakha umlala hi umlala be`darka shela.
“All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” - Leo Tolstoy

C) Test Your Knowledge!

Do you feel you have learned a lot in this blog? Let’s quickly test that!

In the table below, match the Hebrew vocabulary on the left with the definition of the relative in the right column.

MY RELATIVES
Relative Name Definition
1. משפחה a. My male child
2. אמא b. My older male sibling
3. אב c. My female sibling
4. אישה d. My child’s child
5. בעל e. My child’s female child
6. הורה f. My female parent
7. ילד g. My grandparent’s mother
8. בת h. Mother to one of my parents
9. בן i. Relatives
10. אחות j. My female child
11. אח k. My younger male sibling
12. אחות צעירה l. Male spouse
13. אח צעיר m. The father of one of my parents
14. אח גדול n. My child’s male child
15. סבתא רבתא o. My children’s father or mother
16. סבא רבא p. The sister of one of my parents
17. סבתא q. The brother of one of my parents
18. סבא r. My male parent
19. נכד s. My sibling’s female child
20. נכדה t. My sibling’s male child
21. נכד u. My male sibling
22. דודה v. My parents’ sibling’s child
23. דוד w. Female spouse
24. אחיינית x. The grandfather of one of my parents
25. אחיין y. The person I am a parent to
26. בן דוד z. My younger female sibling

How did it go? Don’t worry if you had trouble with it - you’ll get there! With a bit of practice, and our help at HebrewPod101, you’ll soon have these family terms under the belt.

Family Shopping


3. How HebrewPod101 Can Help You Learn Hebrew Family Terms

We hope that we helped you expand your family in Hebrew vocabulary!

HebrewPod101, with its innovative online learning system, stands out among online learning platforms to help you master Hebrew easily.

Our lessons are tailored not only to increase your language skills, but to also inform you of Israeli culture, including the Israeli family structure.

When you sign up, you will get instant access to tools like:

1 - An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
2 - A new Hebrew word to learn every day
3 - Quick access to the Hebrew Key Phrase List
4 - A free Hebrew online dictionary
5 - The excellent 100 Core Hebrew Word List
6 - An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

Further speed up your learning with the help of a personal tutor, who will first assess your current Hebrew language abilities to personalize your training and tailor it to your needs.

Hard work always pays off, and to help you in this, HebrewPod101 will be there every step of the way toward your Hebrew mastery!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Hebrew

HebrewPod101’s Essential Hebrew Travel Phrase Guide

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Traveling to foreign countries is nearly always an exciting, enriching, and beneficial experience. Yet, some things can be real downers, such as boredom on a lengthy flight to Israel. Really, binge-watching onboard movies can only be interesting for so long! And jet lag - another huge downer. Did you know that jet lag is more severe when you travel from the West to the East?

Well, we won’t know how to beat that, but there are fortunately plenty of remedies around to investigate.

To beat flight boredom, though, we may have the answer for you at HebrewPod101! Why don’t you take the time to study Hebrew travel phrases? We make this super easy and fun, with great downloadables, like our PDF Cheat Sheets. Quickly memorize these, and impress your Israeli friends or travel guide with your flawless Hebrew!

Table of Contents

  1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases
  2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words
  3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases
  4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country
  5. HebrewPod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

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1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases

Impressing Israeli people or your travel partners will be the least of the benefits you reap from learning these helpful phrases. These are greater ones:

1) Eliminate Travel Frustration: First of all, you’ll be able to cut out a good chunk of travel frustration and inconvenience due to language barriers.

Know how to pronounce and use at least the basic Hebrew phrases, and then just look foreign. This should go a long way to help you get by and win you friends, because locals would be more inclined to help someone who took the trouble to learn a smidgen of their language.

Injured Woman In An Ambulance

2) Emergency Readiness: In case of an emergency, you will be able to get help a lot quicker if you know how to ask for what in Hebrew. Imagine miming to a doctor or nurse that you have a sore ear but that you’re allergic to penicillin. Not so easy, right?

Rather, you should know basic emergency travel phrases, especially if you suffer from a serious condition. Also, information about life-threatening allergies you have should always be on your person in the language of the country you’re visiting.

3) Sight-Seeing Readiness: Hopefully, you also travel to learn more about a country’s culture. Visiting the main tourist sites in Israel will be more interesting if you know how to ask pertinent questions in Hebrew.

In this blog, we’ll also be giving you important travel phrases to consider - from the 13 essential must-have phrases to ones that are just generally useful and good to know.

Let’s get cracking!


2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words

Preparing to Travel

Seasoned explorers of multiple countries will tell you that certain words and phrases are absolute must-knows in anyone’s travel vocabulary. Learning from them, we collated some of the most essential ones here for you.

If you know these travel phrases and words by heart in Hebrew, you will be much better equipped for your visit than most of your movie-binging travel mates.

1) תודה / toda (Thank you)

As a tourist, you will be relying on the kindness of strangers to get by. Repay them with a small acknowledgment of their friendly generosity - know how to say “thank you” in Hebrew.

2) אתה מדבר אנגלית? / ata medaber anglit? (Do you speak English?)

While it may be a bit of a cop-out, sometimes you just can’t figure out how to communicate. Maybe you’re blanking on one specific word you need, maybe they’re speaking with a heavy accent, or maybe it’s just really late and you really want to get to the hotel. In that case, try asking if they speak English, and hopefully you can make things a little bit simpler for yourself.

Don’t abuse this phrase, though! If you just try to get by without learning any of the local language, not only will you not learn anything - you’ll be out of luck if they can’t speak English!

Man Greeting Someone

3) יש אוטובוס משדה התעופה לעיר? / yesh otoboos misde hate’ufa la’ir? (Is there a bus from the airport to the city?)

Public transit is usually cheaper, if slower, than taking a taxi or rideshare. Use this phrase to see if you can get where you’re going when you’re strapped for cash, or just when you’d like to take the scenic route into town!

4) זה האוטובוס הנכון לשדה התעופה? / ze ha’otoboos hanakhon lisde hate’ufa? (Is this the right bus for the airport?)

Likewise, if you’re the kind of person who can get themselves moving early (or maybe you just have a late flight), maybe you want to take the bus to the airport rather than taking a cab. If that’s the case, you’ll want to be sure you’re actually heading the right way! You wouldn’t want to end up at a lookout point half an hour away, watching your flight take off in the distance, would you?

5) סליחה, כמה עולה נסיעה? / slikha, kama ola nesi’a? (Excuse me, what’s the fare?)

If you are paying for a cab, you’ll want to know how much. Most legal taxis will have meters, but when dealing with a currency you’re not familiar with, it can be worth asking just to double check that you’re paying the right amount - especially if the currency has cents.

6) הזמנתי מקום / hizmanti makom (I have a reservation)

This one you can expect to use at least a few times throughout your trip, unless you’re the kind of person who travels by the seat of their pants and just goes to whatever hotel, motel, or hostel has rooms available.

7) יש לכם חדרים פנויים הלילה? / yesh lakhem khadarim pnu’eem halayla? (Do you have any vacancies tonight?)

If that’s the case, you’ll definitely be using this phrase instead. Quite possibly a lot, depending on how lucky you are!

Couple with a Map

8 ) איפה תחנת הרכבת? / efo takhanat harakevet? (Where is the train station?)

If you’re in a country with an expansive commuter rail system (or maybe just a fan of other types of locomotives), you may want to know where the closest station is. Just don’t go looking for pennies on the rails!

9) אני אלרגי לבוטנים / ani alergi lebotnim (I am allergic to peanuts)

Replace “peanuts” with whatever the word for your allergen may be. If your allergy is serious, you probably already know the importance of stating this very clearly in Hebrew.

If the condition is life-threatening, be sure to have a letter or prescription from a medical professional in Hebrew on your person at all times. Consider getting a medical alert bracelet specially made in Hebrew if your stay will be longer than a month or so.

Person Declining Meat

10) יש לכם מנות צמחוניות? / yesh lakhem manot tzim’khonyot? (Do you have any vegetarian dishes?)

If you dislike eating certain things, or you have certain dietary restrictions, it would be best if you knew how to convey this clearly in Hebrew.

Remember, though, that saying “I’m vegan” or “I’m diabetic” may not be enough to get you what you want. The rules for veganism and vegetarianism are not standard everywhere in the world. Also, your patron might not understand what “diabetic” means. If you have a medical condition, it would be best to research some in-depth vocabulary beforehand.

11) אפשר לקבל מפה? / ef’shar lekabel mapa? (Could I get a map?)

Planning on exploring your destination? Hopelessly lost? Maybe just an amateur cartographer? No matter the reason, this phrase is sure to come in handy. That said, you’re more likely to get use out of it at some sort of tourist or travel center than you are asking a random passerby on the street.

12) כמה זה עולה? / kama ze ole? (How much is this?)

Even if you’re not a big shopper, you’re probably going to need this phrase at some point. Knowing how to count in Hebrew will, of course, help a lot with purchases too.

13) אתם מקבלים כרטיסי אשראי? / atem mekablim kartisei ashrai? (Do you take credit card?)

This is another travel phrase that will smooth your monetary transactions considerably.

Man Giving Credit Card to a Clerk


3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases

Travel Verbs

Unlike the previous phrases, these are not really essential so much as they are useful. Yet, knowing these will still smooth over some bumps on your journey, more than just knowing the crucial phrases would.

1) יש אינטרנט אלחוטי בחינם? / yesh internet al’khuti be’khinam? (Is the Wi-Fi free?)

If you’re abroad, your normal cellular plans probably won’t have any service, and you’ll be totally reliant on publically available Wi-Fi while you’re out and about. Just ask a server, clerk, or attendant, and they’ll be happy to let you know. Just make sure you’re paying attention when they tell you the password!

2) אתה יכול לצלם אותי, בבקשה? / ata yakhol letzalem oti, bevakasha? (Could you take a picture of me please?)

What would a trip be with no photos to commemorate the event? Just be sure to ask this of someone who actually looks like they’d be willing to, unless you’re willing to risk being given the cold shoulder or worse. If you’re at a tourist attraction, you’ll find that most people are more than happy to take one for you, so long as you take one of them as well!

3) יש לך המלצות? / yesh lekha hamlatzot? (Do you have any recommendations?)

Eating alone in a restaurant? Or going out with new Israeli friends or business colleagues? Let them help you decide what to have.

4) אני רוצה מושב במקום ללא עישון, בבקשה / ani rotze moshav bemakom lelo ishun, bevakasha (I’d like to have a non-smoking seat, please)

Though smoking has gone out of fashion in some places, it’s still popular in others. In the event you’re at a restaurant where smoking is allowed on premises, you can always ask this question to the staff and be seated elsewhere.

5) מים, בבקשה / mayim, bevakasha (Water, please)

If you’ve emptied your glass, or are cutting yourself off after a few drinks, you can always ask for some water. It can be especially useful if the restaurant is busy to the point you need to call out to someone to get service.

6) אפשר לקבל את החשבון? / efshar lekabel et ha’kheshbon? (Could I have the check?)

To finish off the restaurant related phrases, if you’re eating with friends or really want to impress your colleagues, taking the bill can be a nice treat for them. Of course, this phrase could come in handy as well if you’re eating alone and you’re just impatient to leave.

7) מה אתה ממליץ לקנות למזכרת? / ma ata mamlitz liknot lemazkeret? (What do you recommend for a souvenir?)

Now that your trip is over, what better way to cap it all off than a memento, or maybe a gift for friends and family at home? It’ll be nicer to have something recommended by the locals than a cheap bauble from the airport store, so go ahead and ask someone you’ve met what they think.


4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country

Survival Phrases

When traveling, it’s possible to keep communication smooth when you don’t share a language.

Do so by keeping these five tips in mind. They are aimed to help you communicate with those who cannot speak English very well, and also to keep your traveling experience pleasant!

1. Keep your English simple and easy to understand.
If the person you are talking to speaks very little English, use basic verbs, adjectives, and nouns, and keep sentences short.

However, don’t patronize them by talking in pidgin or like you would address a child. Keep your speech simple but natural, and use the correct grammar.

For instance, don’t say: “You come when?”. If you say: “When will you come?”, you will very likely be understood, and may even help someone who wants to improve their English.

2. Ask someone to write information down.
Apply Rule 1 first at your hotel, where the staff is very likely to be able to speak some English. Get them to write down, in their native language, things like: “I would like to go to the airport, please,” “Please take me to the beach,” or “Where is the closest bathroom?”

These written questions are something you can then give to taxi drivers or any other people who are willing and able to help you. This simple step could make your life a lot easier when you travel to a foreign country!

3. Avoid asking leading questions!
If you want the correct information from a non-native English speaker, that is.

When you need directions, for instance, don’t ask: “To get to the bus stop, do I need to turn left here?” If the person didn’t really understand you, you will probably just get a smile and a “Yes,” which could possibly make you miss your bus.

Rather, you should ask: “Where is the bus stop?” If they understand you, you will get the correct directions.

4. Pick the right person to ask for help.
Time to look at people and think a bit about their appearance! A younger person who looks like they might be a student is more likely to have English skills than the friendly but ancient lady smiling at you from a fruit stall.

If you don’t see anyone like that, head into town to the nearest bank, hospital, pharmacy, or hotel. The staff at those places usually speak a bit of English.

5. Know when to quit.
If you stuck to the above rules, but the person you are talking to only stares at you blankly, say thank you and leave. Hanging around hoping someone will suddenly understand and respond is just wasting your time, and may irritate them as well. Go find someone else.


5. HebrewPod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

So, reader, have you found this article helpful?

Do you feel comfortable enough to use some essential travel phrases in Hebrew? We’d also love to hear if you think we left out important travel phrases. Leave your suggestions and opinions in the comments!

HebrewPod101 takes the lead with many free learning tools to help you master Hebrew reading and speaking easily, and in fun ways.

These tools include:

- An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
- A new Hebrew word to learn every day
- Quick access to the Hebrew Key Phrase List
- A free Hebrew online dictionary
- The excellent 100 Core Hebrew Word List
- An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

You will also have access to topic-specific recordings like our Before You Travel: Survival Phrases lesson.

Learn even more efficiently with the help of a personal tutor, after taking an assessment test to personalize and tailor your training.

Getting a tutor is also a good option if you meet challenges in your learning, or need to fast-track correct pronunciation and diction. Your very own friendly, Hebrew-speaking teacher will be only a text away on a special app, anywhere, anytime - an excellent option for business persons!

Using a guided learning system that was developed by experts in language and online education, you’ll receive personal feedback and constant support to improve in no time. You’ll also be tasked with weekly assignments in reading, writing, and speaking to hone your Hebrew speaking skills.

Imagine how impressed your Israeli friends or colleagues will be when you display your excellent conversational skills! With HebrewPod101, getting there will be easy and fun.

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How to Use Hebrew Numbers for Daily Usage

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Especially if you’re planning a prolonged visit to Israel, using the correct Hebrew numbers for counting in Hebrew could be very important! Number systems are the other alphabet in any language. In fact, it is a language all of its own, and it serves a multitude of excellent purposes.

Table of Contents

  1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems
  2. Why is it Important to Learn Hebrew Numbers?
  3. Learning Hebrew Numbers
  4. Why Choose HebrewPod101 to Learn all about Hebrew Numbers?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Count to One Billion in Hebrew


1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems

Abacus

1. The Ishango Bone

The origin of counting, and with it numbers, is not clear to historians. While their art showed that prehistoric man had a concept of numbers, the first indication of a formal system was found to be only between 20,000 and 35,000 thousand years old. This discovery came around 1960 in the form of the so-called Ishango Bone found in the Congo, Central Africa.

The 10cm/4 inch piece of bone was a fibula from a baboon. It showed markings with a neat, unified pattern of small lines - far too organized and sophisticated to have formed spontaneously. Archeologists believe that those thin markings were carved to keep score of, or count, something. The lines seemed to represent a sequence of prime numbers and a series of duplications. Some even called it the first-ever pocket calculator!

2. Mesopotamia and Greece

Yet, evidence suggests that it wasn’t until about 4,000 years ago that humans truly started counting and using numbers. Together with the development of civilization came developed agriculture, and the need for measurement and score-keeping was increased.

For this reason, a formal number system and mathematics were developed first in the Middle East, in what was then called Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia was roughly situated in the area of modern-day Iraq and Kuwait. Allegedly, the system was pretty simple at first. Citizens used tokens that represented a certain number of items, such as one token equalling four goats, etc. This eventually evolved into a system of score marks pressed into clay, which ultimately went on to influence Greek mathematics.

3. Hindu-Arabic Numbers

Zero, meanwhile, was conceived later and elsewhere. Inspired by the Hindu religion, which allows for the concept of infinity and eternity, the Indians invented a symbol to represent nothing. The magic of the zero lies not in itself but its combination with other numbers.

The Indians were also the creators of today’s numbers, which are often referred to as Hindu-Arabic numbers. These comprise one or a combination of just ten symbols or digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 0.

Europe learned of this numeric system only around 1200 A.D., when they were introduced to it by an Italian mathematician called Leonardo Pisano Bigollo.

Pisano, also known as Fibonacci, is famous for the discovery of a mathematical sequence with countless applications. Yes, math buffs, it’s the well-known Fibonacci sequence, also called the Golden Mean.

The Roman numeric system, which was clumsy next to the newer inventions, gradually lost popularity in the West. It’s from here that they “slowly spread to conquer the world,'’ as Steven Law puts it.


2. Why is it Important to Learn Hebrew Numbers?

For us at HebrewPod101, this is an easy question to answer! Because we know that numbers are a global unifier.

Counting and numbers have made our lives easier since they were first formulated, even in their most primitive forms.

Numbers in Industry

Without knowing your numbers, you can’t properly communicate about or deal with the following:

1) Your date/time of birth, i.e., your age: This is vital information to be able to give to people like doctors, employers, law enforcement, and so forth.

2) Banking: Worldwide, our monetary systems are built on numbers. Interest, credit scores, and loans all rely on math beyond simple finger counting.

3) Time: Without knowing how to say numbers, you can’t talk or ask about the time and expect to get a useful response. You don’t want to miss an appointment or schedule something for the wrong hour!

4) Ordering data: Numbers bring order to a mostly random life! Scientists even say that numbers and the way they are organized underpin the whole universe. From using them to count your meals’ calories and the number of likes your posts get on social media, to drawing up intricate data charts and explaining existence itself - numbers are what makes these things possible.

All of the above and more are reasons why it is important to know your numbers if you plan on travelling or becoming a foreign worker abroad, in Israel or anywhere else!

Little Girl Counting


3. Learning Hebrew Numbers

Now, let’s explore the Hebrew number system a bit more! Take a look at this infographic.

Language Numbers

Can you make out for yourself what the Hebrew numbers between one (1) and nine (9) look and sound like? Easy, right?

Or, if you struggled a bit, no problem. Why not listen to how Hebrew numbers one (1) through ten (10) sound when pronounced by our native Hebrew speaker and friendly HebrewPod101 teacher?

Then, share with us in the comments your native language’s romanized pronunciation of your number system. We’d love to see all the different ways the same numbers can be pronounced!

Hand With a Thumbs Up

When you have mastered the first ten numbers, you have basically nailed the most significant part of the number system. Well done! Curious to learn the numbers from eleven upward? No problem! Why not subscribe and enroll with us now to immediately enjoy this lesson, teaching you all about Hebrew numbers eleven (11) to one hundred (100)?

Finally, if you’re curious how the numbers look once you’ve broken one hundred, why not check out our Hebrew number vocabulary page? You can see the numbers we’ve just covered, all the way up to four thousand (4,000). Plus, you can also see the Hebrew words for different numbers used in example sentences, to get an idea of how you can use them in your day-to-day conversations!


4. Why Choose HebrewPod101 to Learn all about Hebrew Numbers?

HebrewPod101, like all Innovative Language Learning ventures, takes the pain out of learning a new language by adding a lot of fun. It’s never an easy thing to learn a new language, but we formulated all your lessons so they’re nicely bite-sized, and geared to keep you motivated!

Also, we created a great number of fantastic tools to help keep struggle and boredom out of the learning process.

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! HebrewPod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective, and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect with! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Hebrew!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Hebrew with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Hebrew dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about HebrewPod101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Hebrew teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Hebrew word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Hebrew level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

So, why wait? Sign up with HebrewPod101 right away! Also, let us know in the comments if you’ve used this blog post, or any of the free lessons anywhere to master Hebrew numbers. Or, even better - share your birthdate using what you’ve learned!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Count to One Billion in Hebrew

How To Post In Perfect Hebrew on Social Media

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you’re learning to speak Hebrew, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Hebrew.

At Learn Hebrew, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Hebrew in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Hebrew

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Hebrew. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Eyal eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Eyal’s post.

בארוחת ערב עם האחים! (Be-arukhat erev im ha-akhim!)
“At dinner with the bros!”

1- האחים (ha-akhim)

First is an expression meaning “the bros.”
In Israel there is an emphasis on familiarity and closeness. Men who are very close to each other will often refer to one another as “brother”. Sometimes people call total strangers “my brother”.

2- בארוחת ערב עם האחים! (be-arukhat erev im ha-akhim!)

Then comes the phrase - “at dinner with the bros!”
Israeli men love hanging out only with their guy friends every once in a while. It could be going out to dinner, going to the beach, or having a beer. Male bonding can be a very strong time, especially since many times these men know each other from the army. Being in the army is a very influential period as men have to do everything together, from waking up to going to sleep.

COMMENTS

In response, Eyal’s friends leave some comments.

1- משווים למי נשאר יותר שיער על הראש! (Mashvim lemi nish-ar yoter se’ar al ha-rosh!)

His college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “Comparing who has more hair left on his head!”
Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous and want to contribute to the conversation.

2- נראה בסדר בסך-הכל… (Nir’eh beseder besakkh - hakol̷ ;)

His girlfriend’s nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “Looks ok, all in all…”
Use this expression to show you are feeling cynical.

3- ענת מרשה לך לצאת בלעדיה?! (Anat marsha lekha latzet bil’adeyha?!)

His girlfriend’s high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “Anat lets you go out without her?!”
Use this expression if you wish to tease the poster.

4- זה בסדר, מגיע לו להנות! (Ze beseder, magi-a lo lehenot!)

His girlfriend, Anat, uses an expression meaning - “It’s alright, he deserves to have fun!”
Use this expression in response to the previous post to indicate that you don’t mind your boyfriend hanging out with this male friends.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ארוחת ערב (arukhat erev): “dinner”
  • אחים (ha-akhim): “bros, brothers”
  • בסדר (beseder): “ok, all right”
  • בסך-הכל (besakh-hakol): “all in all”
  • הרשה (hirsha): “to let, to allow”
  • יצא (yatza): “to go out”
  • הגיע לו (higi-a lo): “to deserve”
  • להנות (lehenot): “have fun”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Hebrew restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Hebrew

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Hebrew phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Anat shop with her sister at the mall, posts an image of the two of them, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anat’s post.

    קצת ריפוי בשופינג עם אחותי המהממת. (K’tsat ripuy be-shoping im akhoti ha-mehamemet.)
    “A bit of shopping therapy with my stunning sister.”

    1- ריפוי בשופינג (ripuy be-shopping)

    First is an expression meaning “shopping therapy.”
    Most times you can just say “I’m going shopping” or “doing some shopping”. But when you call it “shopping therapy”, you emphasize the fun and relaxing aspects of it. Especially when it’s done with someone dear to you, like your sister.

    2- מהממת (mehamemet)

    Then comes the phrase - “stunning.”
    This word is often used by girls to describe their best friend, sister or mom. it’s used not only to show how loved they are, but also to show appreciation for their beauty - inside and out.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anat’s friends leave some comments.

    1- וואו, איך בא לי לצאת לשופינג, מקנאה! (Wow, eikh be li latset le-shopping, mekana!)

    Her high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “Wow, how I feel like shopping. Jealous!”
    With this phrase, you indicate that you wish you could also shop, and feel envious of the poster.

    2- אין בעולם דבר יותר טוב מאחיות! (Ein ba-olam davar yoter tov me-akhayot!)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Tamar, uses an expression meaning - “Nothing better than sisters in the world!”
    Use this expression to show your appreciation of female siblings.

    3- תראי לי מה קנית כשתחזרי הביתה… (Tar’ii li ma kanit keshe-takhzeri ha’bayta̷ ;)

    Her neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “Show me what you bought when you get home…”
    Use this expression when you are curious about the poster’s shopping.

    4- תהנו! (Tehenu!)

    Her boyfriend, Eyal, uses an expression meaning - “Have fun!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster a good time.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • מהממת (mehamemet): “stunning”
  • ריפוי (ripuy): “therapy”
  • לקנא (lekane): “to be jealous”
  • אין כמו… בעולם (ein kmo… ba-olam): “nothing like”
  • הביתה (ha’baita): “(to) home”
  • תהנו! (tehenu!): “Enjoy! Have fun!”
  • לחזור (lakhzor): “to come back, to return”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Hebrew

    Sports events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Hebrew.

    Eyal plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of the team, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eyal’s post.

    נעם חושב שהוא יכול לנצח אותי במטקות. הוא טועה! (Noam khoshev she-hu yakhol lenatse’akh oti bematkot. Hu to’eh!)
    “Noam thinks he can beat me in paddle-ball. He’s wrong!”

    1- מטקות (matkot)

    First is an expression meaning “paddle-ball”.
    Although the origin of the name “matkot” is unknown, it’s the most popular beach game in Israel. Even though it’s a casual game and not very physically demanding, some people take it seriously and even buy specialty paddles to play with.

    2- טעות! (taut!)

    Then comes the phrase - “wrong!.”
    Literally, this word means “mistake”. But its use is the same as the English word “wrong”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eyal’s friends leave some comments.

    1- אחרי ההפסד שלך בפעם הקודמת, לא הייתי משוויץ. (Akharei ha-hefsed shelkha bafa-am ha-kodemet, lo ha’iti mashvits!)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “After your loss last time, I wouldn’t brag.”
    Use this expression to tease the poster with a bit of sarcasm.

    2- אלון, לא ציינת שהוא הפסיד לי. פעמיים. (Alon, lo tsiyanta she-hu hifsid li, pa’amayim!)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “Alon, you didn’t mention he lost to me. Twice.”
    Use this expression to participate in the conversation started by the previous poster. Again, it is meant in a playful, teasing way.

    3- קדימה אייל! (Kadima Eyal!)

    His supervisor, Yigal, uses an expression meaning - “Go, Eyal!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster a successful game.

    4- לא הוגן! הסתנוורתי מהשמש! (Lo hogen! histanvarti me-ha-shemesh!)

    His college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “Not fair! I was blinded by the sun!”
    This is a further elaboration on a topic started by other posters in the thread. It is also playful and teasing.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • לנצח (lenatze’akh): “to win”
  • לחשוב (lakhshov): “to think”
  • הפסד (hefsed): “loss (in a game)”
  • להשוויץ (lehashvits): “to brag”
  • להפסיד (lehafsid): “lose”
  • פעמיים (pa’amayim): “twice”
  • קדימה! (kadima!): “go! (lit; forward)”
  • להסתנוור (lehistanver): “to be blinded”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Hebrew

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Anat shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anat’s post.

    איזה שיר מעולה! (Eize shir me’ule!)
    “What a great song!”

    1- איזה (eize)

    First is an expression meaning “what a….”
    This expression expresses wonder and admiration and is similar to saying “what a…” in English. In Hebrew it is also a question; however, the meaning of it isn’t “what” but “which”. It can also be used in the feminine -” איזו/eizo”.

    2- מעולה (me’ule)

    Then comes the phrase - “great, top notch.”
    This word describes something of good quality. It also is used for things we personally enjoy. In addition, you can use it casually, for instance, when deciding on something with a friend, as it means the same as “okay, great”. You can use this word to describe something in the feminine as well: “מעול0ה/me’ula”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anat’s friends leave some comments.

    1- זה השיר מהמסיבה אתמול, נכון? (Ze ha-shir me-ha-mesiba etmol, nakhon?)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Tamar, uses an expression meaning - “It’s the song from the party yesterday, right?”
    Use this expression when you and the poster have a history with the song.

    2- כל האלבום מעולה. (Kol ha-albom me’ule.)

    Her neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “The whole album is really good.”
    Use this expression to share a personal opinion about the music.

    3- תמר, די כבר להשמיע את זה בלופ! (Tamar, day kvar lehashmi’a et ze be-loop!)

    Her boyfriend, Eyal, uses an expression meaning - “Tamar, stop playing it on a loop!”
    Use this expression to tease the poster in a playful way.

    4- זה מה שהצעירים שומעים היום? (Ze ma she-ha-tse’eerim shom’im hayom?)

    Her supervisor, Yigal, uses an expression meaning - “Is that what youngsters listen to nowadays?”
    Presumably, you’re a bit older than the poster when you use this phrase. It’s a question that can be rhetorical but also a good conversation-starter.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • שיר (shir): “song”
  • מסיבה (mesiba): “party”
  • נכון? (nakhon?): “right?”
  • ממש (mamash): “really”
  • להשמיע (lehashmi’a): “to play (lit: to make heard)”
  • לופים (loopim): “repeatedly (lit: loops)”
  • צעירים (tse-irim): “youngsters, young people”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Hebrew Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers with in Hebrew!

    Eyal goes to a concert, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eyal’s post.

    איזו הופעה מטורפת! (Eyzo hofa’ah metorefet!)
    “What a crazy concert!”

    1- הופעה (hofa’ah)

    First is an expression meaning “concert.”
    In Hebrew, the term for concert, הופעה, (hofa’ah), is more general and is the equivalent of the English word “show”. This term is also used for other types of shows that are not necessarily musical. When saying the word “concert” in Hebrew, קונצרט (kontzert), it refers only to a classical music concert.

    2- מטורף (metorefet)

    Then comes the phrase - “crazy, insane.”
    When describing a show, an event, a party, etc., this word, which usually has a negative association, takes a positive meaning to describe a strong, electrifying atmosphere or an impressive setting.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eyal’s friends leave some comments.

    1- אתה בשורה הראשונה?! (Ata ba-shura ha-rishona?)

    His college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “Are you in the first row?!”
    Ask this to show your interest in the topic, and for more information from the poster.

    2- מדהים! (Madhim!)

    His neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “Amazing!”
    Use this comment when you feel very positive about, and in agreement with the post.

    3- אני לא מאמין שאני מפספס את זה. (Ani lo ma’amin she-ani mefasfes et ze.)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “I can’t believe I’m missing this.”
    Use this expression when you are feeling a bit disheartened.

    4- אה…. סליחה, אבל, מי אלה? (Eh… slikha, aval, mi ele?)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “Eh… excuse me but who are they?”
    Use this expression to tease the poster, and/or to find out the identity of the artist.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • שורה (shura): “row, line”
  • ראשון (rishon): “first”
  • מדהים (madhim): “amazing”
  • להאמין (leha’amin): “to believe”
  • לפספס (lefasfes): “to miss”
  • סליחה (slikha): “sorry, excuse me”
  • אבל (aval): “but”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Hebrew

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Hebrew phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Anat accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anat’s post.

    שברתי את הנייד שלי. סליחה שאני לא זמינה בינתיים. (Shavarti et ha-nayad sheli. Slikha she-ani lo zmina beynatayim.)
    “I broke my cell phone. Sorry, I’m not available for now.”

    1- נייד (nayad)

    First is an expression meaning “mobile, mobile phone.”
    The word נייד (nayad) literally means “mobile”, and is short for “mobile phone”

    2- זמין (zamin)

    Then comes the phrase - “available.”
    This word literally means what it says. It can refer to an available person or available resources.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anat’s friends leave some comments.

    1- שוב??? (Shuv???)

    Her nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “Again???”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling exasperated with the poster. This comment is probably best saved when you know the poster well and have a good, close relationship with them.

    2- אני יכולה להמליץ לך על מעבדת תיקונים. (Ani yekhola lehamlitz lakh al ma’abadat tikunim.)

    Her high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “I can recommend you a cellular lab.”
    Use this comment if you wish to be helpful.

    3- אני אתן לך את הנייד הישן שלי בינתיים. (Ani eten lakh et ha-nayad ha-yashan sheli beynatayim.)

    Her boyfriend, Eyal, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll give you my old cell for now.”
    This is another comment that shows caring and a helpful attitude.

    4- הטלפונים של פעם לא היו נשברים. (Ha-telefonim shel pa’am lo hayu nishbarim.)

    Her supervisor, Yigal, uses an expression meaning - “The old phones never used to break.”
    This is a general comment so as to be part of the conversation, and give an appropriate, personal opinion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • בינתיים (beynatayim): “meanwhile, for now”
  • עוד פעם (od pa’am): “once more, again”
  • מעבדה (ma-abada): “lab, laboratory”
  • תיקון (tikun): “fix”
  • להמליץ (lehamlitz): “to recommend”
  • לתת (latet): “to give”
  • להשבר (lehishaver): “to break”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to describe an accident in Hebrew. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Hebrew

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Hebrew!

    Eyal gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eyal’s post.

    משעמם לי, מי רוצה לעשות משהו? (Masha’amem li, mi rotze la’asot mashehu?)
    “I’m bored. Who wants to do something?”

    1- משעמם לי (mesha’amem li)

    First is an expression meaning “I’m bored.”
    This is a more juvenile way of expressing boredom, loosely translated to “boring to me”. This structure is used as a way of emphasizing your passiveness in the matter (i.e. it’s not your fault that you are bored) and also that it is a temporary situation. If you use the proper sentence structure: אני משועמם (ani meshuamam), it sounds more like you are bored of life in general, and not just right now.

    2- משהו (mashehu)

    Then comes the phrase - “something.”
    This is actually a compound word made of the words מה שהוא (ma she-hu). This loosely translates to “what that is”, meaning, a thing that exists but is undefined. If you want to say “someone”, you would say, מישהו (mishehu) “who that is”- a person who exists.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eyal’s friends leave some comments.

    1- רוצה להתחלף? יש לי דו”ח להגיש מחר. (Rotze lehitkhalef? yesh li duakh lehagish makhar.)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “Wanna switch? I have a report due tomorrow.”
    Use this expression to be playful and light about the poster’s predicament, while also reminding them that things could have been worse for them.

    2- תספור את המרצפות בבית שלך. (Tispor et ha-mirtzafot ba-bayit shelkha.)

    His college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “Count the tiles in your house.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling frivolous and wish to tease the poster.

    3- בוא לפה, יש לי משחקי וידאו. (Bo lepo, yesh li miskhakey video.)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “Come over. I have video games.”
    Use this suggestion as an invitation to the poster.

    4- אתה יכול לקרוא ספר. (Ata yakhol likro sefer.)

    His neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “You could read a book.”
    This is a suggestion aimed to be helpful to the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • לרצות (lirtsot): “to want”
  • להתחלף (lehitkhalef): “to switch”
  • דו”ח (duakh): “report”
  • מרצפות (mוrtzafot): “tiles, slabs”
  • לספור (lispor): “to count”
  • משחק וידאו (miskhak video): “video game”
  • לקרוא (likro): “to read”
  • ספר (sefer): “book”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Hebrew

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Hebrew about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Anat feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anat’s post.

    אני מותשת מהיום הזה! אני צריכה פיצוי דחוף. (Ani muteshet me-ha-yom haze! Ani tzrikha pitzuy dakhuf!)
    “I’m exhausted from this day! I need compensation ASAP!”

    1- מותש (mutash)

    First is an expression meaning “exhausted”.
    This adjective means “exhausted”. It’s quite a common word and is used in social media and other contexts. For example, a “war of attrition” is מלחמת התשה (milkhemet, hatasha).

    2- דחוף (dakhuf)

    Then comes the phrase - “urgent, ASAP.”
    This noun used to be found mostly in office or military settings, stamped on envelopes containing urgent materials. Now, however, it found it’s way to social media and expresses not only urgency but cravings as well, like “I need some ice cream ASAP!”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anat’s friends leave some comments.

    1- מסכנה שלי. מבטיח לפנק אותך כשתגיעי הביתה. (Miskena sheli. Mavti’akh lefanek otakh ke-she-tagi’i ha’bayta.)

    Her boyfriend, Eyal, uses an expression meaning - “My poor thing. I promise I’ll spoil you when you get home.”
    Use this expression when you wish to be supportive of and empathetic with your beloved.

    2- טוב שזה נגמר. (Tov she-ze nigmar.)

    Her neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “The good thing is that it’s over!”
    Use this expression to be supportive by pointing out the positives about the poster’s situation.

    3- לכי לישון מוקדם הערב. (Lekhi lishon mukdam ha’erev.)

    Her high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “Go to bed early tonight.”
    Another supportive suggestion.

    4- מחר יהיה יותר טוב! זה בטוח! (Makhar yihiye yoter tov, ze batu’akh!)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Tamar, uses an expression meaning - “Tomorrow will be better! For sure!”
    Use this suggestion when you are feeling optimistic.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • להצטרך (lehitstarekh): “to need”
  • פיצוי (pitzuy): “compensation”
  • מסכן (misken): “poor, miserable”
  • לפנק (lefanek): “to treat, to pamper, to spoil”
  • מוקדם (mukdam): “early”
  • בטוח (batu’akh): “sure, surely”
  • להבטיח (lehavti’akh): “to promise”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Hebrew! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Hebrew

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Hebrew.

    Eyal suffers a painful injury, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eyal’s post.

    נפצעתי במשחק הכדורגל של שבת, אבל בקרוב אחזור לשחק! (Niftzati be-miskhak ha-kaduregel shel shabat, aval bekarov akhazor lesakhek!)
    “I was injured in Saturday’s soccer game. But I’ll be back to play soon!”

    1- כדורגל (kaduregel)

    First is an expression meaning “soccer, football”.
    The word for “soccer” or “football” in Hebrew is a compound word made of כדור (kadoor), meaning “ball”, and רגל, meaning “leg” or “foot”. Because the word כדור ends with a “ר”ת, and the word רגל starts with a “ר”, one of them was omitted and the phrase became one whole word.

    2- כדורגל של שבת (kaduregel shel shabat)

    Then comes the phrase - “Saturday’s soccer”.
    Soccer is one of the most popular sports in Israel. It is often played regularly on Saturdays by groups of friends. In addition, most of the Israeli soccer league games take place on Saturday evening. So the phrase “Saturday’s soccer” became quite common.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eyal’s friends leave some comments.

    1- אתה מתכוון שבקרוב תחזור להפסיד? (Ata mitkaven she-bekarov takhazor lehafsid?)

    His college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “You mean, you’ll be losing again in no time?”
    Use this expression when you are feeling frivolous and want to tease the poster, trying to lighten up the mood for the poster.

    2- יהיה בסדר אחי. קח הרבה משככי כאבים. (Yihiye beseder akhi, kakh harbe meshak’khey ke’evim.)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “It’ll be alright, bro. Take a lot of painkillers.”
    Use this expression when you’re feeling supportive and wish to console the poster.

    3- החלמה מהירה! (Hakhlama mehira!)

    His supervisor, Yigal, uses an expression meaning - “Get well soon!”
    This is the traditional response to news of an injury or illness that’s not too serious.

    4- זו אשמתך. זה מה שקורה למי שעושה ספורט. (Zo ashmatkha. Ze ma she-kore lemi she-ose sport.)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “It’s your fault. That’s what happens when you do sports.”
    Use this expression if you want to tease the poster by being a bit confrontational. It would be better if you knew the poster well and the two of you are used to bantering this way, because this comment could be construed as a criticism.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • להפצע (lehipatsa): “to get injured”
  • להתכוון (bekarov): “soon”
  • להתכוון (lehitkaven): “to mean”
  • משככי כאבים (meshakh’khei ke’evim): “painkillers”
  • החלמה (hakhlama): “recovery”
  • מהר (maher): “quick, fast”
  • אשמה (ashma): “fault”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Hebrew

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Anat feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anat’s post.

    רצינו לצאת לטיול, ודווקא היום יורד גשם! (Ratzinu latset le-ti’yul ve-davka hayom yored geshem!)
    “We wanted to go on a hike, but it’s raining today!”

    1- טיול (tiyul)

    First is an expression meaning “hike”.
    This Hebrew word is very general and has many meanings, unlike the English term which is more specific. It can be used to describe an intensive hike or a family day-trip that includes walking in nature or visiting historical sites. It can also refer to a tour with a guide, a trip abroad, or even a short walk with the dog.

    2- דווקא (davka)

    Then comes the phrase - “bad luck”.
    דווקא is one of the most useful words in Hebrew. It can mean that something was done out of spite or bad intent, and it can also express bad luck (like Murphy’s law, where anything that can go wrong, will go wrong).

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anat’s friends leave some comments.

    1- איזה באסה! (Eize ba’asa!)

    Her neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “What a bummer!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    2- לא נורא! מחר אמור להיות בהיר. (Lo nora! makhar amur lihiot bahir!)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Tamar, uses an expression meaning - “Never mind! It should be clear tomorrow.”
    Share this comment to show you are feeling optimistic that things will be better soon.

    3- לא בדקת את התחזית? אמרו שיהיה גשום. (Lo badakt et ha-takhazit? amru she-yihiye gashum.)

    Her supervisor, Yigal, uses an expression meaning - “Didn’t you check the forecast? They said it would be rainy.”
    This is a slightly pedantic comment, probably best saved if you’re older than the poster.

    4- נלך מחר! (Nelekh makhar!)

    Her boyfriend, Eyal, uses an expression meaning - “We’ll go tomorrow!”
    Use this expression when you want to cheer the poster up with alternative plans.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • לרדת (laredet): “to go down”
  • לרצות (lirtsot): “want”
  • באסה (ba’asa): “bummer (slang)”
  • גשם (geshem): “rain”
  • גשום (gashum): “rainy”
  • תחזית (takhazit): “forecast”
  • לא נורא ((colloquial) lo nora): “never mind”
  • How would you comment in Hebrew when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Hebrew

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Eyal changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of him and Anat, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eyal’s post.

    אוהב אותך, יפה שלי! (Ohev otakh, yafa sheli!)
    “Love you, my beautiful!”

    1- אוהב אותך (ohev othakh)

    First is an expression meaning “love you.”
    Lack of the word אני (ani), meaning “I”, in this sentence makes the expression more casual and less dramatic or romantic. However, it is still a lovely way to express emotion.

    2- יפה שלי (yafa sheli)

    Then comes the phrase - “my beautiful.”
    This is a romantic thing to say because it not only means “you are beautiful, and you are mine”, but it also implies that “to me, you are the most beautiful”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eyal’s friends leave some comments.

    1- גם אני אותך מותק. (Gam ani otkha motek.)

    His girlfriend, Anat, uses an expression meaning - “Me too, sweetie!”
    This would be an appropriate response if your boyfriend is the poster.

    2- יופי! הגיע הזמן שזה יהיה רשמי! (Yofi! higi’a ha-zman she-ze yihiye rishmi!)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “Good! it’s official now!”
    Use this expression to show that you’ve been expecting this announcement, and find it agreeable.

    3- איזה חמודים אתם. (Eize khamudim atem.)

    His neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “How cute you are.”
    Use this comment to casually express that you think the couple are well suited.

    4- תשמור עליה, היא מדהימה! (Tishmor aleyha, hi madhima!)

    His high school friend, Tamar, uses an expression meaning - “Take care of her! She’s amazing!”
    Use this expression to indicate your appreciation of the female. Probably not an advisable post if you’re a guy, unless you’re her family!

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • מותק (motek): “sweetie, honey”
  • יופי (yofi): “good, right”
  • הגיע הזמן (higi’a hazman): “about time”
  • רשמי (rishmi): “official”
  • חמוד (khamud): “cute”
  • לשמור (lishmor): “to save, to keep, to watch”
  • מדהים (madhim): “amazing”
  • What would you say in Hebrew when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Hebrew

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Hebrew.

    Anat is getting married today, so she eaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anat’s post.

    מתרגשת מאד לקראת החופה! (Mitrageshet me’od likrat ha-khupa!)
    “So excited before the wedding ceremony!”

    1- מתרגשת לקראת (mitrageshet likrat)

    First is an expression meaning “exited before, excited towards”.
    This is a very useful expression. You can use it when you are feeling excited for something in the near future. But it can also be used for other emotions as well, like being stressed, happy or sad. However, this expression is mostly used to describe excitement.

    2- חופה (khupa)

    Then comes the phrase - “khuppah, Jewish marriage ceremony.”
    The חופה (khuppah) is a canopy comprising four poles or sticks, with a sheet of fabric tied to them like a roof. The structure represents a home, underneath which the Jewish marriage ceremony takes place. Therefore, the ceremony itself is also called a חופה (khuppah).

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anat’s friends leave some comments.

    1- מזל טוב! (Mazal tov!)

    Her nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “Best wishes!”
    This is a casual and traditional congratulation appropriate to good news like this.

    2- בשעה טובה! (Besha’ah tova!)

    Her supervisor, Yigal, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations!”
    This is another traditional response to news like this.

    3- ברכות לכלה היפה בעולם! (Brakhot lakala hayafa ba-olam!)

    Her neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “Congrats to the most beautiful bride in the world!”
    Use this congratulation when you feel very appreciative of the bride’s beauty.

    4- וגם לחתן המקסים! (Ve-gam la-khatan ha-maksim!)

    Her college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “And the charming groom!”
    Use this expression in response to the previous poster’s, so as to include the groom in the congratulatory comment.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • להתרגש (lehitragesh): “to be excited”
  • מזל טוב! (mazal tov!): “best wishes! (literally: good luck)”
  • בשעה טובה! (be-sha’ah tova!): “congratulations! (literally: it’s a good hour)”
  • ברכות (brakhot!): “congrats! (literally: blessings)”
  • כלה (kala): “bride”
  • חתן (khatan): “groom”
  • מקסים (maksim): “charming”
  • How would you respond in Hebrew to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Hebrew

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Hebrew.

    Eyal finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eyal’s post.

    אנחנו בהריון! (Anakhnu be-herayon!)
    “We are pregnant!”

    1- בהריון (beherayon)

    First is an expression meaning “pregnant.”
    This literally translates to something more like “in pregnancy” or “during pregnancy” than “pregnant”. It’s used in this way most likely to suggest that it’s a work in progress.

    2- אנחנו בהריון (anakhnu be-herayon)

    Then comes the phrase - “we are pregnant.”
    Some people like this expression and see it as a way of saying “we will share the burden of the pregnancy together”. Other people see it as pretentious since only the woman carries the child in her womb. Either way, this expression is as popular in Hebrew as it is in other places.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eyal’s friends leave some comments.

    1- תישן עכשיו כמה שאתה יכול, כי בקרוב תוכל לשכוח מזה! (Tishan akhsav kama she-ata yakhol, ki be-karov tukhal lishkoa’kh mize!)

    His college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “Sleep as much as you can now, because soon you will/can forget about it!”
    Use this expression to be playful and teasing with the expecting couple.

    2- ידעתי! ממתי ענת אוהבת מיונז? (Yada’ati! mi-matay Anat ohevet mayonez?)

    His wife’s high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “I knew it! Since when does Anat like mayonnaise?”
    Use this expression if you’ve observed a change in your female friend’s diet, now knowing that it’s due to her pregnancy.

    3- זה בן או בת? (Ze ben o bat?)

    His neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “Is it a boy or a girl?”
    Ask this question to show you’re interested in the topic, and if you’re curious about the baby’s gender.

    4- זה הקטן גדול יהיה! (Ze ha-katan gadol yihiye!)

    His supervisor, Yigal, uses an expression meaning - “This small one will grow to be great!”
    This is a blessing for the new baby, stating it not as a wish but as fact.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • הריון (herayon): “pregnancy”
  • תשכח מזה (tishkakh mize): “forget about it”
  • כמה שאפשר (kama she-efshar): “as much as possible”
  • ממתי? (mimatay?): “since when?”
  • בן (ben): “boy”
  • בת (bat): “girl”
  • ידעתי! (yada’ati!): “knew it!”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Hebrew Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Hebrew.

    Anat plays with her baby, posts an image of the darling, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anat’s post.

    הצחוק שלה זה הצליל הכי מתוק בעולם! (Ha-tzkhok shela ze ha-tzlil hakhi matok ba-olam!)
    “Her laugh is the sweetest sound in the world!”

    1- מתוק (matok)

    First is an expression meaning “sweet.”
    Much like in English, this adjective isn’t used only to describe a sweet flavor. It can also describe a person, a quality, a face, a sound, and other things. As with all adjectives in Hebrew, it can be conjugated in the feminine, plural, etc.

    2- צחוק (tzkhok)

    Then comes the phrase - “laughter.”
    This is a very useful word in colloquial Hebrew. If you want to say “I was kidding” you’d say, “בצחוק” (be-tzkhok). If you want to say “this is a serious matter” you’d say, “זה לא צחוק” (ze lo tzkhok).

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anat’s friends leave some comments.

    1- בא לי לאכול אותה! איזו מתוקה! (Ba li le’ekhol ota! eyzo metuka!)

    Her neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “She is so adorable (lit. “I could eat her up” )! What a sweetie!”
    Use this expression to show your overwhelming adoration of the cute child.

    2- טוב, מתי את משאירה לי אותה לבייביסיטר? (Tov, matay at mash’ira li ota le-beybisitter?)

    Her high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “Well, when are you leaving her with me to babysit?”
    This is another way of saying that you adore the baby, while also being helpful. The implication is that it would be a pleasure to babysit such a sweetie.

    3- שתי היפות שלי! (Shtey ha-yafot sheli!)

    Her husband, Eyal, uses an expression meaning - “My two beauties!”
    Use this comment to express your appreciation of your wife and baby girl.

    4- איזה חמודונת! (Eyze khamudonet!)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Tamar, uses an expression meaning - “What a cutie!”
    This is a commonly-used expression which indicates that you think something or someone (usually a small animal, child or baby) is sweet or very likeable.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • צליל (tzlil): “sound”
  • לאכול אותה (le-ekhol ota): “to eat something up (meaning “something is so cute” )”
  • טוב (tov): “well, so”
  • יפה (yafe): “pretty”
  • חמודון (khamudon): “cutie”
  • להשאיר (lehash-ir): “to leave”
  • בייביסיטר (babysitter): “beybisitter”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Hebrew! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Hebrew Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Eyal goes to a family gathering, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eyal’s post.

    אסיפה של כל השבט! (Asefa shel kol ha-shevet!)
    “A gathering of the whole clan!”

    1- שבט (shevet)

    First is an expression meaning “clan, tribe.”
    The word for “clan” or “tribe” may sometimes be used humorously to describe a family with many members.

    2- מפגש

    Then comes the phrase - “a gathering, a get-together .”
    This noun describes a casual or friendly gathering rather than something official or work related, in which case the word “פגישה” (pgisha) is used.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eyal’s friends leave some comments.

    1- תביא לי שאריות מהבישולים של אמא שלך! (Tavi li she’eriyot me-ha-bishulim shel ima shelkha!)

    His nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “Bring me leftovers of your mom’s cooking!”
    Use this expression if you’re very familiar with the poster’s family.

    2- מגניב! איפה נפגשתם? (Magniv! eyfo nifgashtem?)

    His college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “Cool! Where did you meet?”
    Use these phrases to indicate your positive feelings about the gathering, and want to know more about it.

    3- תמסור ד”ש לאחותך ממני. (Timsor dash le-akhotkha mimeni.)

    His wife’s high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “Say hello to your sister for me.”
    Use this expression to send the poster’s sister your regards.

    4- איזה כיף שיש משפחה גדולה! (Eyze keif she-yesh mishpakha gdola!)

    His neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “What fun to have a big family!”
    Use this expression to contribute to the conversation with a positive,general comment.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • שאריות (she’eriyot): “leftovers”
  • בישולים (bishulim): “cooking”
  • מגניב (magniv): “cool (colloquial)”
  • להפגש (lehipagesh): “to have a meeting”
  • ד”ש (דרישת שלום) (dash (drishat shalom)): “saying hello (by 3rd party)”
  • מסר (masar): “to send, to deliver”
  • ממני (mimeni): “from me”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Hebrew

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Hebrew about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Anat waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anat’s post.

    לונדון, הנה אנחנו באים! (London, hine anakhnu ba’im!)
    “London, here we come!”

    1- הנה (hine)

    First is an expression meaning “here.”
    This word typically translates to “here”. But in this case, it is not an adjective describing location (this is here, this is there) but an interjection: “found it! here it is!”

    2- “הנה אני בא” (hine ani ba)

    Then comes the phrase - “here I come.”
    This is a commonly used phrase in Hebrew that means “here I come” or “here it comes”. It is even used in some popular songs and has a bit of a dramatic effect, like in English. So you wouldn’t use this casually to reply to a friend who is texting you and asking where you are.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anat’s friends leave some comments.

    1- נסיעה טובה! (Nesi’ah tova!)

    Her neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “(Have) a safe trip!”
    This is a common well-wish for travellers.

    2- אל תשכח להביא שוקולדים! (Al tishkakh lehavi shokoladim!)

    Her college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “don’t forget to bring chocolates!”
    Use this expression if you’re expecting sweet gifts upon the poster’s return.

    3- הרווחתם את החופשה הזו! תהנו! (Hirvakhtem et ha-khufsha hazu! tehenu!)

    Her high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “You have earned this vacation! Enjoy!”
    This is a warmhearted, generous comment that also wishes the poster an enjoyable trip.

    4- ארזתם מטריות? (Araztem mitriyot?)

    Her nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “Did you pack umbrellas?”
    Use this expression to tease the poster with a bit of irony. The UK, where London is the capital of England, is known for rainy, non-traditional holiday weather.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • נסיעה טובה! (nesi’ah tova!): “A good trip!”
  • לשכוח (lishkoakh): “to forget”
  • שוקולדים (shokoladim): “chocolates”
  • להרוויח (leharvi’akh): “to earn”
  • חופשה (khufsha): “vacation”
  • לארוז (le’eroz): “to pack”
  • מטריה (mitriya): “umbrella”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Hebrew!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is also great!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Hebrew

    So maybe you’re strolling around at a local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Hebrew phrases!

    Eyal finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eyal’s post.

    סוף-סוף! אפשר להשיג תאנים! (sof-sof! efshar lehasig te’enim!)
    “Finally! They have figs!”

    1- סוף-סוף (sof-sof)

    First is an expression meaning “finally.”
    Literally this translates to “end end” or “end to ends”. This saying can be used to conclude a story, and can also mean a sign of relief that a long wait is over.

    2- אפשר (efshar)

    Then comes the phrase - “possible, may.”
    This word can be used as either an adjective or an adverb. When you want to state that a sort of action is possible, you say “אפשר” and then the infinitive of the verb, such as “אפשר לקנות”. If someone asks you if they can do something, you can answer colloquially by saying “אפשר” (efshar).

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eyal’s friends leave some comments.

    1- יש! (Yesh!)

    His wife, Anat, uses an expression meaning - “Yay!”
    This exclamation shows you’re enthusiastic and feel positive over the poster’s good luck.

    2- תקנה לי קילו, אני אחזיר לך כסף! (Tikne li Kilo, ani akhzir lekha kesef!)

    His neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “Buy me a Kilo. I’ll give you money back!”
    Use these phrases to make arrangements with the poster.

    3- וזה מרגש אותך כי…? (Ve-ze meragesh otkha ki…?)

    His college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “And it excites you because…?”
    Use this expression when you are feeling frivolous and want to tease the poster a bit.

    4- אני לא מאמין שאתה באמת אוהב את זה. (Ani lo ma’amin she-ata be’emet ohev et ze.)

    His nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “I can’t believe you actually like this.”
    This is a personal opinion, suitable to use only if you know the poster very well. They should have no doubt that you don’t mean this as serious criticism.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • תאנה (תְּאֵנָה): “fig”
  • להשיג (לְהַשִּׂיג): “to acquire, to get”
  • יש! (יֵשׁ!): “Yay!”
  • להחזיר (לְהַחְזִיר): “to bring back”
  • כסף (כֶּסֶף): “money, silver”
  • מרגש (מְרַגֵּשׁ): “exciting”
  • אשכרה (אַשְׁכָּרָה): “actually”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Hebrew

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Hebrew, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Anat visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anat’s post.

    הכנרת במלוא התפארת! (Ha-kineret bi’mlo ha-tif’eret!)
    “Sea of Galilee in all its glory!”

    1- כנרת (kineret)

    First is an expression meaning “Sea of Galilee.”
    In Hebrew, the Sea of Galilee is a feminine noun and is referred to as the Kineret (כנרת). The name derives from the Hebrew word for violin (”Kinor”, כינור). The sea was given this name because of its shape, which slightly resembles a violin.

    2- תפארת (tif’eret)

    Then comes the phrase - “glory, splendor.”
    Although a pompous word, it is used whimsically to describe beautiful things, sometimes in an exaggerated way.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anat’s friends leave some comments.

    1- איזו יפה היא! (Eizo yafa hi!)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Tamar, uses an expression meaning - “What a beauty she is!”
    Use this expression to show your appreciation.

    2- אתם עושים שם קאמפינג? (Atem osim sham kemping?)

    Her college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “Are you camping there?”
    Ask a question if you want more information.

    3- לא רחצנו שם מאז כיתה י”ב! (Lo rakhatznu sham me’az kita yod-beit!)

    Her high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “We hadn’t washed there since we were seniors in high school!”
    This is a chatty comment, well suited to share personal information and to contribute to the conversation.

    4- מרחו הרבה קרם הגנה! שלא תישרפו בשמש! (Mirkhu harbe krem hagana! shelo tisarfu ba-shemesh.)

    Her nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “Put on a lot of sunblock! Don’t get sunburnt.”
    Use this expression to show your concern for the poster’s skin health.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • מלוא (melo): “fullness, entirety”
  • קאמפינג (kamping): “camping”
  • לרחוץ (lirkhots): “to wash”
  • כיתה (kita): “class, grade”
  • י”ב (yod-beit): “12th (grade)”
  • להשרף (lehisaref): “to get burnt”
  • הגנה (hagana): “protection, safety”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Hebrew

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Hebrew!

    Eyal relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eyal’s post.

    יושב על החוף עם ספר- אין יותר טוב מזה. (Yoshev al ha-khof im sefer - ein yoter tov mize.)
    “Sitting on the beach with a book; nothing better than that!”

    1- על החוף (al hakhof)

    First is an expression meaning “on the beach.”
    A common activity in any beach town in Israel is to sit on the beach, sometimes with a book, and rest. This can be done either alone or with a friend. Whatever you do, always remember to put on sunblock and reapply it regularly.

    2- יותר טוב (yoter tov)

    Then comes the phrase - “better.”
    In Hebrew, there aren’t separate words for “good”, “better”, and “best”. What you would say instead is literally “good”, “more good”, and “most good”. This applies to all other adjectives as well.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eyal’s friends leave some comments.

    1- תאמין לי, החיים שלך טובים. (Ta’amin li, ha-khayim shelkha tovim.)

    His college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “Believe me, your life is good.”
    This comment is aimed to point out the poster’s privileged position.

    2- ואני עכשיו תקוע במשרד. (Ve-ani akhshav takua ba-misrad.)

    His nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “And I’m (now) stuck at the office.”
    Use this expression to indicate to the poster that things could’ve been worse for him/her.

    3- איזה פינוק! (Eize pinuk!)

    His wife, Anat, uses an expression meaning - “What a treat!”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling envious of the poster.

    4- אל תשכח שיש לנו פגישה מחר בתשע בבוקר. (Al tishkakh she-yesh lanu pgisha makhar be-tesha ba-boker.)

    His supervisor, Yigal, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t forget that we have a meeting tomorrow morning at 9.”
    This comment is a reminder of a prior arrangement.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • להאמין (leha’amin): “to believe”
  • חיים (khayim): “life”
  • להתקע (lehitaka): “to be stuck”
  • משרד (misrad): “office”
  • כרגע (karega): “right now”
  • פינוק (pinuk): “treat, indulgence”
  • פגישה (pgisha): “meeting”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Hebrew When you’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Anat returns home after a vacation, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anat’s post.

    הייתה חופשה מדהימה, אבל באמת שאין כמו הבית! (Hayta khufsha madhima, aval be’emet she-ein kmo ha-bayit!)
    “It was an amazing vacation, but really there’s no place like home!”

    1- חופשה (khufsha)

    First is an expression meaning “vacation.”
    The word for “vacation” in Hebrew comes from the same root as the word for “freedom” (חופש, khofesh). it’s easy to see the reasoning behind it: In colloquial Hebrew, the word for “freedom” is sometimes used to talk about a vacation.

    2- אין כמו בבית (ein kmo babayit)

    Then comes the phrase - “no place like home.”
    This famous saying from the book and movie “The Wizard of Oz” is often used by Hebrew speakers upon returning from a vacation as a way of self-comforting.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anat’s friends leave some comments.

    1- לא יודע לגבי זה… (Lo yode’a legabei ze̷ ;)

    Her husband, Eyal, uses an expression meaning - “I don’t know about that…”
    Use this expression to indicate that you don’t quite agree with the poster’s sentiment.

    2- ברוכים השבים! (Brukhim ha-shavim!)

    Her neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “Welcome back!”
    This is the common, traditional greeting when someone returns from a trip.

    3- זה אומר שסיימתם לגרום לי לקנא? (Ze omer she-siyamtem ligrom li lekane?)

    Her nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “Does that mean you’re done making me jealous?”
    Use this expression to make light conversation.

    4- בחזרה למשרד עם מצברים מלאים! (Bekhazara la-misrad im matzberim mele’im!)

    Her supervisor, Yigal, uses an expression meaning - “Back to the office with full energy!”
    Use this expression if you’re the poster’s boss or colleague.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • בית (bayit): “home, house”
  • לדעת (lada’at): “to know”
  • לגבי (legabey): “about, referring to”
  • ברוך השב! (barukh ha-shav!): “Welcome back!”
  • לקנא (lekane): “to be jealous”
  • מלא (male): “full”
  • מצבר (matzber): “battery (of a car)”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public commemoration day such as Purim? Purim is the commemorative holiday in which Jews celebrate being saved from persecution in the ancient Persian Empire. It is commonly celebrated with costume parties.

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Hebrew

    It’s an historic day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Eyal is at a costume party at a friend’s house, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eyal’s post.

    בסוף ענת שיכנעה אותי להתחפש. (Basof Anat shikhne’ah oti lehitkhapes.)
    “Eventually Anat convinced me to wear a costume.”

    1- שיכנע (sikhne’a)

    First is an expression meaning “to convince.”
    In Hebrew this means to persuade or convince. it’s used frequently in speech as people in Israel love making a point and voicing their opinions. In a charming way, of course.

    2- התחפש (hitkhapes)

    Then comes the phrase - “to put on a costume.”
    Naturall, this verb is used mostly around the time of Purim, but it can also be used to described the attire of spies and detectives.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eyal’s friends leave some comments.

    1- תודה שאתה אוהב את זה! (Tode she-ata ohev et ze!)

    His wife, Anat, uses an expression meaning - “Thank you for loving it!”
    Use this expression to show your appreciation of the poster’s comment, if you’re his wife.

    2- יצרת תקדים. עכשיו תצטרך להתחפש כל שנה. (Yatzarta takdim! akhshav titztarekh lehitkhapes kol shana!)

    His high school friend, Tamar, uses an expression meaning - “You’ve set a precedent! Now you’ll have to wear a costume every year!”
    Use this expression to joke with the poster.

    3- פורים שמח! (Purim same’akh!)

    His neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “Happy Purim!”
    This is the traditional wish during Purim.

    4- דווקא מתאים לך פיראט! (Davka mat-im lekha pirat!)

    His college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “Actually it suits you, being a pirate!”
    Use this expression if you are feeling frivolous and want to tease the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • בסוף (basof): “eventually (lit: in the end)”
  • להודות (lehodot): “to admit”
  • תקדים (takdim): “precedent”
  • ליצור (litsor): “to create, to make”
  • דווקא (davka): “actually”
  • להתאים (lehat-im): “to suit, to fit”
  • פורים שמח! (Purim same’akh!): “Happy Purim!”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    Pirum and other public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Hebrew

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Anat goes to her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anat’s post.

    איך זכיתי להיות מוקפת באנשים מדהימים כמוכם? תודה! (Eikh zakhiti lihiyot mukefet be-anashim madhimim kmokhem? toda!)
    “How did I get to be surrounded by such incredible people? Thank you!”

    1- מוקף (mukaf)

    First is an expression meaning “surrounded, circled.”
    This word means surrounded, usually by people, police, etc. But it has a more day-to-day use since it also means to be circled (with a pen, for example). So it doesn-t always have to be used dramatically.

    2- כמוך (kamokha)

    Then comes the phrase - “like you.”
    The way to say “like you, like me, like us, etc.” is quite simple. We take the Hebrew word for “like” - “kmo” כמו, and then we add the correct suffix to represent who we are referring to. So instead of using two words, like in English, we just need one.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anat’s friends leave some comments.

    1- יום-הולדת שמח יפיופה! החגיגות רק מתחילות! (Yom huledet same’akh yafyufa! ha-khagigot rak matkhilot!)

    Her neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “Happy birthday, you gorgeous! The celebrations are just beginning!”
    Use this congratulation if you are feeling great enthusiasm about and appreciation for the poster and their birthday.

    2- ברוכה הבאה למועדון ה-30, כיף פה! (Brukha haba’ah lemo’adon ha-shloshim! keif po!)

    Her high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “Welcome to the 30’s club; it’s fun here!”
    Use this expression to be humorous, referring to the poster’s age, which is in the thirties.

    3- עד מאה ועשרים מתוקה שלי! (Ad me’ah ve-esrim metuka sheli!)

    Her husband, Eyal, uses an expression meaning - “Live up to one hundred and twenty years, sweetheart!”
    This is a sweet wish for the poster to live long.

    4- שתמיד תהיי מאושרת! (She-tamid tihiyi meusheret!)

    Her husband’s high school friend, Tamar, uses an expression meaning - “May you always be happy!”
    Use this wish to congratulate the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • לזכות (lizkot): “to win, to get”
  • יום-הולדת (yom-huledet): “birthday”
  • יפיופה (yafyufa): “(slang) gorgeous”
  • מועדון (mo-adon): “club”
  • עד מאה ועשרים! (ad me’ah ve-esrim): “Till 120 years!”
  • תמיד (tamid): “always, forever”
  • מאושר (meushar): “happy”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Hebrew

    Impress your friends with your Hebrew New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Eyal celebrates the New Year, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eyal’s post.

    שנה טובה לכולם! שתהיה שנה של שיפור עצמי והשגת יעדים! (Shana tova le-khulam! she-tihiye shana shel shipur atzmi ve-hasagat ye’adim!)
    “Happy New Year, everyone! Let it be a year of self improvement and reaching goals!”

    1- שנה טובה (shana tova)

    First is an expression meaning “Happy New Year.”
    Originally this phrase was used only during the Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashanah. However, it is currently used during the Roman calendar’s New Year as well.

    2- השגת יעדים (hasagat ye-adim)

    Then comes the phrase - “achieving goals.”
    Like anywhere else, people in Israel use the new year as an opportunity to achieve their personal goals. That is why most gyms have discounts for new members around this time of year. In Hebrew the word יעד (ya-ad) means both “goal” and “destination”. They are both places you want to reach; although one is a physical place, and the other, an abstract one.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eyal’s friends leave some comments.

    1- שנה מדהימה ומלאה באהבה! (Shana madhima u-mele’ah be-ahava.)

    His wife, Anat, uses an expression meaning - “Amazing New Year that’ll be filled with love.”
    This is a sweet New Year’s wish for your spouse or partner.

    2- שנה טובה גבר, אולי השנה תצליח לנצח אותי בכדורגל! (Shana tova gever, ulay ha-shana tatzliakh lenatzeakh oti be-khaduregel.)

    His college friend, Noam, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year, man; maybe this year you’ll beat me in soccer.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling playful and frivolous.

    3- שנה טובה ושתמיד תמצא חניה! (Shana tova ve-she-tamid timtza khanaya!)

    His neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year and may you always find a parking spot!”
    This is a funny New Year wish.

    4- שנה טובה אחי! (Shana tova, akhi!)

    His nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year, bro!”
    This is a conventional New Year’s wish from one male to another male friend.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • לשפר (leshaper): “to improve”
  • להשיג (lehasig): “to achieve”
  • אהבה (ahava): “love”
  • למצוא (limtso): “to find”
  • חניה (khanaya): “parking space”
  • תאריך (ta’arikh): “a date (calendar)”
  • משמעות (mashma’ut): “meaning”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Hebrew

    What will you say in Hebrew about Christmas?

    Anat celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Anat’s post.

    מדליקים נר ראשון של חנוכה עם המשפחה. (Madlikim ner rishon shel khanuka im ha-mishpakha.)
    “Lighting the first candle of Hanukkah with the family.”

    1- הדליק (hidlik)

    First is an expression meaning “to light.”
    This verb means to light or set on fire. Since ancient times, light was fire and fire was light. In modern Hebrew we use this same verb for turning on an electric light, even though there is no fire involved.

    2- נר ראשון (ner rishon)

    Then comes the phrase - “first candle.”
    During the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah, which is a Christmas custom, people light candles for eight days: one on the first day, two on the second, and so on, until the eighth day. The first and last candles are usually lit in a setting with extended family present. It commemorates the rededication of the second Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, Israel.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Anat’s friends leave some comments.

    1- זה החג האהוב עלי! בעיקר בזכות הלביבות. (Ze ha-khag ha-ahuv alay! be-ikar bizkhut ha-levivot.)

    Her husband, Eyal, uses an expression meaning - “My favorite Holiday! Mainly because of the potato latkes.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling playful and are in a humorous mood. A latke is a potato pancake - traditional Hanukkah food.

    2- איפה קנית את הסופגניות? (Eifo kanit et ha-sufganyot?)

    Her neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “Where did you buy the doughnuts?”
    Ask this question if you need more information.

    3- שוב אייל והאובססיה שלו למטוגנים! (Shuv Eyal veha-obsesiya shelo li-mtuganim.)

    Her high school friend, Michal, uses an expression meaning - “Eyal and his obsession with fried food again.”
    Use this expression to comment on the previous poster’s phrase about the latkes.

    4- אייל אתה כבר לא צעיר כמו פעם, תכין את נוגדי הצרבת. (Eyal, ata kver lo tza’ir kmo pa’am. Takhin et nogdey ha-tzarevet.)

    Her nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “Eyal, you are not as young as you used to be. Prepare the antacids.”
    This is also a comment on one of the previous posters’ about the fried food. It keeps the conversation going.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • אהוב (ahuv): “favorite, loved, beloved”
  • בעיקר (be’ikar): “mainly, especially”
  • בגלל (biglal): “because”
  • לביבות (levivot): “latkes”
  • סופגניות (sufganiyot): “doughnuts”
  • מטוגנים (metuganim): “fried food”
  • צרבת (tzarevet): “heartburn”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Hebrew

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Hebrew phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Eyal celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Eyal’s post.

    חוגגים את יום הנישואין שלנו! מצפה לעוד הרבה שנים מאושרות לצידך! (Khogegim et yom ha-nisu’in shelanu! Metsape le’od harbe shanim me’usharot letzidekh!)
    “Celebrating our anniversary! Looking forward to many more happy years with you!”

    1- יום נישואין (yom nisu-’n)

    First is an expression meaning “anniversary.”
    When referring to a marriage anniversary, we use the phrase יום נישואין (yom nisuin) in Hebrew, which literally means “marriage day”. For other types of anniversaries, people use another phrase: יום השנה (yom ha-shana), which translated literally means “annual day”. However, this phrase is a bit archaic and is not commonly used.

    2- לצידך (letzidekh)

    Then comes the phrase - “beside you .”
    This expression has a deeper meaning than just being “at one’s side”. It is used for married couples, brothers in arms, family members and other profound connections. It implies a common path and an unbreakable bond among people.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Eyal’s friends leave some comments.

    1- אין כמוך יקירי! תודה על כל מה שהיה עד היום, ועל כל מה שעוד יהיה בעתיד. (Eyn kamokha yakiri! Toda al kol ma she-haya ad hayom, ve-al kol ma she-od yihiye be’atid.)

    His wife, Anat, uses an expression meaning - “You are a darling! Thank you for everything so far, and for all to come.”
    This is a heart-felt reply to your spouse’s post about your wedding anniversary.

    2- מזל טוב לזוג הצעיר! (Mazal tov lazug hatza-ir!)

    His supervisor, Yigal, uses an expression meaning - “Congrats to the young couple!”
    This is a fairly traditional congratulation.

    3- כל הכבוד לך שמצאת אישה נפלאה שמצליחה להתמודד איתך! (Kol ha-kavod she-matzata isha nifla-ah she-matzlikha lehitmoded eet’kha!)

    His nephew, Alon, uses an expression meaning - “Good that you have found an incredible woman who can tolerate you!”
    Use this expression to joke with the poster.

    4- אתם מושלמים ביחד! (Atem mushlamim beyakhad!)

    His neighbor, Orly, uses an expression meaning - “You are perfect together!”
    Use this expression if you feel very positive about the marriage.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • לחגוג (lakhgog): “to celebrate”
  • יקירי (yakiri): “darling”
  • עתיד (atid): “future”
  • להתמודד (lehitmoded): “to cope, to deal with”
  • מושלם (mushlam): “perfect”
  • לחכות (lekhakot): “to wait”
  • להצליח (lehatsli’akh): “to succeed, to manage”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Hebrew! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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    How to Start Thinking in Hebrew

    Learn 4 tools and techniques to stop translating in your head and start thinking in Hebrew

    Going through Hebrew lessons is enough to get by and learn the basics of Hebrew, but to truly become fluent you need to be able to think in Hebrew. This will allow you to have conversations with ease, read smoothly, and comprehensively understand natives. To do this, you need to go beyond just completing daily or weekly lessons.

    We naturally translate in our heads because it’s viewed as the easiest way to learn the definitions needed when learning a language. This way of learning can actually hinder your skills and fluency later on. If your brain has to make neural connections between the word you’re learning, what it means in your native tongue, and the physical object the connection will not be nearly as strong. When you bypass the original translation between Hebrew and your native language then there is a more basic and strong connection between just the Hebrew vocabulary word and the tangible object.

    start thinking in Hebrew

    In this blog post, you will learn the 4 important techniques to easily and naturally begin to speculate about the daily occurrences in your life. The best part is all of these techniques are supported and can be achieved through HebrewPod101.com.

    Create Your Free Lifetime Account and Start Learning the whole Hebrew Language from the Beginning!

    1. Surround yourself with Hebrew

    Surround Yourself

    By surrounding yourself with Hebrew constantly you will completely immerse yourself in the language. Without realizing it you’ll be learning pronunciation, sentence structures, grammar, and new vocabulary. You can play music in the background while you’re cooking or have a Hebrew radio station on while you study. Immersion is a key factor with this learning process because it is one of the easiest things to do, but very effective. Even if you are not giving the program your full attention you will be learning.

    One great feature of HebrewPod101.com is the endless podcasts that are available to you. You can even download and listen to them on the go. These podcasts are interesting and are perfect for the intention of immersion, they are easy to listen to as background noise and are interesting enough to give your full attention. Many of them contain stories that you follow as you go through the lessons which push you to keep going.

    2. Learn through observation
    learn through observation

    Learning through observation is the most natural way to learn. Observation is how we all learned our native languages as infants and it’s a wonder why we stop learning this way. If you have patience and learn through observation then Hebrew words will have their own meanings rather than meanings in reference to your native language. Ideally, you should skip the bilingual dictionary and just buy a dictionary in Hebrew.

    HebrewPod101.com also offers the materials to learn this way. We have numerous video lessons which present situational usage of each word or phrase instead of just a direct translation. This holds true for many of our videos and how we teach Hebrew.

    3. Speak out loud to yourself
    talk to yourself

    Speaking to yourself in Hebrew not only gets you in the mindset of Hebrew, but also makes you listen to how you speak. It forces you to correct any errors with pronunciation and makes it easy to spot grammar mistakes. When you speak out loud talk about what you did that day and what you plan to do the next day. Your goal is to be the most comfortable speaking out loud and to easily create sentences. Once you feel comfortable talking to yourself start consciously thinking in your head about your daily activities and what is going on around you throughout the day.

    With HebrewPod101.com you start speaking right away, not only this, but they have you repeat words and conversations after a native Hebrew speaker. This makes your pronunciation very accurate! With this help, you are on the fast path to making clear and complex sentences and then actively thinking about your day.

    4. Practice daily

    If you don’t practice daily then your progress will be greatly slowed. Many people are tempted to take the 20-30 minutes they should be practicing a day and practice 120 in one day and skip the other days. This isn’t nearly as effective because everyday you practice you are reinforcing the skills and knowledge you have learned. If you practice all in one day you don’t retain the information because the brain can realistically only focus for 30 minutes at most. If you’re studying for 120 minutes on the same subject little of the information will be absorbed. Studying everyday allows you to review material that you went over previous days and absorb a small amount of information at a time.

    It’s tough to find motivation to study everyday, but HebrewPod101.com can help. It’s easy to stay motivated with HebrewPod101.com because we give you a set learning path, with this path we show how much progress you’ve made. This makes you stick to your goals and keep going!

    Conclusion

    Following the steps and having patience is the hardest part to achieving your goals, it’s not easy learning a new language. You are essentially teaching your brain to categorize the world in a completely new way. Stick with it and you can do it just remember the 4 tools I taught you today! With them, conversations, reading, and understanding will become much easier. The most important thing to remember is to use the tools that HebrewPod101.com provides and you will be on your way to being fluent!

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    4 Reasons Why Hebrew Slang Words Will Make You Fluent

    Learn 4 honest reasons you need Hebrew slang words and why they are so vital to truly learning and mastering the language.

    Teachers may normally cringe at the thought of their students learning Hebrew slang words. After all, slang words and phrases are typically defined as being grammatically incorrect. So why would your teacher want you to spend time learning the “wrong way” to speak Hebrew? Here are 4 of the top reasons why you should study slang words and expressions when learning Hebrew or any new language.

    reasons to learn hebrew slang words

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    1. Native Speakers Use Slang Expressions in Everyday Conversation

    If you are going to study a foreign language and plan to use it to speak with native speakers, then you have to learn slang words and expressions. Otherwise, just using formal expressions and grammar may alienate you from native speakers and make it more difficult to establish a real connection. So it is best to at least learn some common slang words and expressions if you’re planning to meet or speak socially with someone.

    2. Slang Words Are Used All Throughout Hebrew Culture

    If you turn on any popular Hebrew TV show, listen to any song, or watch any movie, you are quickly going to see the value of learning Hebrew slang phrases. Just like everyday conversations between native speakers, Hebrew culture is filled with slang phrases and expressions. Without at least some knowledge of the more common slang phrases, popular culture and most conversations will be very confusing and potentially alienating.

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    3. Slang Expressions Help You Better Express Your True Thoughts and Feelings

    Only relying on formal grammar and vocabulary is very limiting, especially in social situations. Just like in your native language, using the appropriate Hebrew slang words can help you express a broader range of emotions, thoughts, and feelings.

    4. Proper Use of Slang Makes You Sound More Natural

    We’ve all met foreigners who technically used formal language perfectly but still sounded odd and well….foreign. But when you use the right slang words and expressions, you will sound more natural and like a true native speaker. If you notice, even most politicians include a sprinkling of slang expressions and words throughout their speeches to help them sound more natural and to better connect with the audience.

    The Dark Side of Slang Expressions

    Learning Hebrew slang words can indeed help you sound more natural, better understand the people and culture, and make integration much easier. However, there is a dark side: using the wrong slang expressions can also make you look foolish, uneducated, and potentially disrespectful.

    But how do you know which slang words or phrases to use and when?

    The truth is that you can’t learn the most modern and appropriate slang words in textbooks or formal classroom settings. By the time the information gets incorporated into a formal curriculum, it’s already outdated and no longer in use by actual Hebrew people. And while you can learn current slang expressions from Hebrew TV shows, movies, songs, and games, you may not understand the context. If that happens, you may use the right Hebrew slang words but in the wrong situation and still look like a fool or possibly even offend someone.

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    So where can you learn current slang expressions and the right context in which to use them?

    At HebrewPod101, native speaking instructors create audio and video lessons that can include slang expressions and words. Our instructors provide context and examples for all the Hebrew slang words used in any lesson to make sure students understand the right time and place to use them.

    Hebrew slang words and expressions may be grammatically incorrect but they are vital to truly understanding and immersing yourself in the culture. In fact, it will be very difficult to fully understand any movie, TV show, song, game, or even 1-on-1 conversation without knowing a few of the more common slang expressions.

    However, it is important to learn the proper context and use of even popular slang expressions or you may come across as confusing, disrespectful, or uneducated.
    At HebrewPod101, you’ll learn how to use slang phrases and words to draw the right attention and avoid these problems.

    Don’t forget to sign up for a Free Lifetime Account on HebrewPod101.com to access tons of FREE lessons and features to become fluent in Hebrew!

    How to Learn Hebrew in Your Car?

    Stuck in traffic? Losing time in your car? Have you ever felt that in all this wasted time, you could have watched the 750 episodes of One Piece, finished the last Super Mario ten times, or even better…you could have learned Hebrew? Between family, friends and work, in addition to this time-consuming commute, it can become difficult to find time to properly learn Hebrew.

    How to Learn Hebrew in Your Car? Learn language in car

    Fortunately, every problem has a solution, and what could be a better solution than turning that commute time into learning time? Stop passing the time mindlessly listening to the radio and try some of our best tips for mastering Hebrew in your car!

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    Click Here To Start Learning Hebrew Right Now!

    You can learn Hebrew in your car, hands free
    While driving, it’s important that you keep your focus on the road, so this is why our top tips won’t require you to use your hands!

    Listening to Hebrew audio content in the car is a good way to learn
    This is because it is a fun and efficient way to learn. With HebrewPod101.com podcasts, you will be able to discover Hebrew culture through topics about everyday life. Instead of the radio, listen to a Hebrew podcast adapted to your level, from Absolute Beginner to Advanced, and you will make progress sooner that you would expect!

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    You can listen to Hebrew music in the car
    Did you know that you can learn Hebrew by singing while driving? Listen to songs from anime or Hebrew idols and try to identify some words you learned.

    Challenge yourself! Use the Hebrew you’ve studied up to this point and see how much you understand! Making the jump to real-life Hebrew is a scary one, but friendly children’s songs are a great place to start!

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    You can learn alone in your car
    When you’re driving alone, you can be as loud as you want – there is nothing better for remembering your Hebrew lessons than repeating loudly, again and again. Next time you see a driver who seems to be talking alone, you will know he or she is just learning Hebrew!

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    You can learn through repetition with your passengers
    If there are passengers in the car, it can be more stimulating to learn together. You can set a role play with Hebrew dialogues. With HebrewPod101.com, you can download all the lessons transcript including the dialogues, as a PDF. Print it out and have some fun speaking in Hebrew!

    One of the passengers can answer the quiz available on each of our lessons, while another can correct that person. Listening to someone at a more advanced level of Hebrew or a better accent is positive and helps you improve.

    You can learn Hebrew offline
    Do you have a poor connection or are unable to use the Internet? It’s not a problem for learning Hebrew! Before you start your commute, use our App to download the lessons you want to study and the podcast you want to listen to in your car, and you will be able to enjoy your lessons offline. Entering a tunnel won’t be a problem anymore. What a pleasure to listen to audio content without having the host freezing every 5 seconds!

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    Click here to download the App and learn offline!

    You can learn every day at your own pace
    One of the best approaches for learning a language is little by little and often. It’s not efficient to take in a huge amount of information at one time. What you need is to study on a regular basis – a little bit of Hebrew every day. You commute several days a week, and that is all time you can take advantage of!

    You have the freedom to choose the lessons and podcasts you want to focus on, at your own rhythm. You may want to do a little revision or discover how to talk about a new topic. And if you’re wondering what to learn next, you can use the new Learning Paths, which is our customized pathway feature that gives you a step-by-step way to learn Hebrew without getting lost!

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    Click here to access Learning Paths at HebrewPod101!

    If you don’t have a car and commute by another method, these tips are still valid! Learning Hebrew is no longer limited to the classroom or your house; there are so many benefits to learning in your car or elsewhere. Reaching a conversational level will take you less time than you could ever have imagined! Don’t forget to sign up for your Free Lifetime Account and enjoy our content!

    10 Monthly Goals to become fluent in Hebrew

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    Hey Hebrew Learner!

    Shortcuts for learning and tips to remember Hebrew words are useful but it’s even also important to fix objectives to reach every month! What Is Your Language Learning Goal for the Month?
    In your journey to become fluent and conversational here are 10 monthly goals you can go after!

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    1) I’ll finish Survival Phrases series on HebrewPod101.com by listening to two lesson a day.

    2) I’ll give a 3 minute introductory speech in Hebrew to my Hebrew friends.

    3) I’ll finish reading one Hebrew book by reading 10 pages a day.

    4) I’ll pass my Hebrew test.

    5) I’ll write 10 postcards in Hebrew to my Hebrew friends.

    6) I’ll memorize 5 Hebrew songs.

    7) I’ll finish memorizing 350 words with Flashcards on HebrewPod101.com.

    8 ) I’ll fully understand one Hebrew movie by watching it every day.

    9) I’ll learn how to talk about past, present and future events.

    10) I’ll master 150 words by memorizing 5 words a day.

    No money, no credit card required, just you and the ton of lessons!

    If you follow those monthly goals, you will be sure to make some amazing progress. And remember, if you’re really interested in getting on the fast-track to fluency, sign up for a FREE lifetime account at HebrewPod101.com!