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Lesson Transcript

Hi everyone.
Welcome to The Ultimate Hebrew Pronunciation Guide.
In this lesson, you'll learn the final 4 consonant sounds in Hebrew.
צ
כ/ח
כּ"
Nearly all of these consonant sounds do not appear in English, so they'll likely be new to you.
Be sure to practice them because these are unique sounds of Hebrew that learners often get wrong!
Are you ready?
Then let's get started!
The first consonant sound is...
רע ""bad""
רוטב ""sauce""
רופא ""doctor"""
This sounds a bit like a growling sound. Lightly contact the back part of the tongue with the fleshy part which hangs down from the back of the mouth, called the 'uvula'. You may have to push the root of the tongue backwards until you feel a slight pressure. Create a turbulent sound by resisting the airflow through this passage. It should sound a bit like you're gargling. Listen to (host name).
ר, ר (slowly)
ר, ר (slowly)
The next consonant sound is...
צבע ""color""
צב ""turtle""
מוצץ ""pacifier"""
"This consonant sound is like a combination of a T and an S sound.
It starts off as a t sound, but ends with an s sound.
You can pronounce this sound by saying 'cats' or 'tsunami'."
צ, צ (slowly)
צ, צ (slowly)
The next consonant sound is...
כ/ח
"כ/ח
אוכל ""food""
מלוכלך ""filthy""
שמחה ""happiness""
בדיחה ""joke"" "
This is very similar to the CH sound in the words 'bach' or 'loch ness', except it's pronounced even further back in the mouth. Push the back part of the tongue futher into the back of the mouth until you contact the uvula. Allow a small stream of turbulent air to seep through the opening. It sounds as though you are clearing your throat. Listen to (host name).
כ/ח, כ/ח (slowly)
כ/ח, כ/ח (slowly)
The final consonant sound for this lesson is...
"כּ
כל ""all"""
Like the K in the word 'kite'.
כּ, כּ (slowly)
כּ, כּ (slowly)
Well done! You just learned all 4 of the remaining consonant sounds in Hebrew.
צ
כ/ח
כּ"
We've covered every single sound that appears in the Hebrew language. You can now properly pronounce anything in Hebrew! Isn't that great?
How difficult were they to learn? Please comment and share your thoughts.
In the next lesson, you'll learn about diphthongs in Hebrew.
See you in the next Ultimate Hebrew Pronunciation Guide lesson!

46 Comments

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HebrewPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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We've covered every single sound that appears in the Hebrew language. How difficult were they to learn?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:03 PM
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Hi Maria,


Thanks for posting and sharing your questions! I'll try to answer them:


In the past, the sound "R" in Hebrew used to be a lot more "rolling" but nowadays it is mostly pronounced flat and short.

The full spelling of the letter "י" is "יוֹד" ("Yod"), but it is true that Hebrew speakers often pronounce it "Yud" - it is a common mistake. I wouldn't say it's a matter of accent, maybe it's a matter of education...


I'm not sure what you mean by "when "nu" is at the end of a Hebrew word" could you maybe clarify by giving an example?... or do you mean like in the word "אנחנו" ("we", anakhnu)? This should always be "nu" and I'm not familiar with a "no" pronunciation in such cases...

I hope that helps :)


Best,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Maria
Tuesday at 08:03 AM
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Random question! Is the letter "Yod" pronounced as "Yod" or "Yud"? I hear some Hebrew speakers say "Yod" and others say "Yud." Is it just different Hebrew accents? Also, when "nu" is at the end of a Hebrew word, some say "nu" while other say "no." Is it just accent-based?


Thank you!

Maria
Tuesday at 08:03 AM
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Hello! I have a question.


Is it necessary, while pronouncing the "r" in Hebrew, to make the rolling sound? The one that sounds like the french "r"? Or is it enough to make the "r" sounds like the closing of the throat? I hear some Hebrew speakers pronouncing the "r" with a rolling sound, but I also hear others who pronounce it like the closing of the throat. I was also wondering if these two ways of pronouncing it is actually based on different Hebrew accents? Just like English can be pronounced differently based on your accent.

י

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 03:54 PM
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Hi Stuart,


Thanks for posting your question!


This is a very hard question, as this is a very individual process... For some, it is not a large challenge at all, while others maintain an accent even after being entirely fluent...

Things that can help are having a good ear, speaking more than one language, and of course, training the pronunciation. A great way to do it is by listening carefully to a local speaker and trying to imitate the sound and melody of the phrases. Doing it in front of a mirror is also recommended 😄


I hope that helps :)


Best,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Stuart
Sunday at 12:09 PM
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Hey there - luckily I only need to focus on learning the two guttural sounds. How long does it typically take for an English native speaker to pick up the guttural R and guttural X sounds?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 09:27 PM
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Hi Ken,


Thanks for posting!


Very interesting, thanks for sharing this 👍


Happy you enjoyed the lesson! Please let us know in case you have any questions.


Best,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Ken
Saturday at 08:32 AM
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Interesting video. So it seems that the actually sound needed to pronounce a "resh" or "r" sound in Hebrew is an Arabic "GHim", a glutteral G sound, also called "ghimel" & "ghayin". While the modern "Gh" has become to imitate the European 'G' as in girl. Now I can understand the reason why so many words sound unlike the way they appear in text. Thanks for the video it was very helpful. zot Torah hezeh tov meod, todah rabah.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 08:40 PM
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Hi Lila Shamar, Isabel and Monica P.,


Thanks for commenting! I'll try to answer your questions -


@Lila Shamar & Monica P: regarding the k/kh sounds - in Hebrew, there are two letters that indicate the 'k' sound - ק and כֹּ (khaf with a dagesh point), while the letter "כ" (without the dagesh point) sounds like "ch" in "Bach" (often romanized as "kh"). This is all


@Isabel - yes, the Hebrew 'resh' is a little tricky for many learners. Try to think of it as a short Spanish R, which is produced by trembling the tongue. It is recommended to practice this in front of a mirror, maybe it'll help 😄😄


Happy to assist, and enjoy learning Hebrew!

Best,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Monica P.
Friday at 01:05 AM
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Wondering why the kaf sound is different that the K in English.

Isabel
Monday at 12:23 AM
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The hardest was the “r”sound