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Lesson Transcript

Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 58 - High Frequency Adjectives
In today’s lesson, we will cover some high-frequency adjectives to help you express yourself in various situations.
In Hebrew, "It's dangerous" is Ze mesukan. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ze mesukan. Now, let’s hear it once again, Ze mesukan. The first word Ze means, "it." Let’s hear it one more time, Ze. Next, we have Mesukan, which in English is "dangerous." To recap, when describing something in Hebrew, you use the preposition Ze "it," and then the adjective.
Now let's go over some other adjectives that you can use with the pattern we just introduced. Let's try hot, as in spicy. In Hebrew, "It's hot" is Ze charif. The word for "hot" is Charif.
If you are referring to the temperature of an object instead, "It's hot" in Hebrew is Ze cham. The word for "hot" in this case is Cham. The opposite is Ze kar. Therefore, the word for "cold" in Hebrew is Kar.
Be careful! In Hebrew, we don't use the same pattern for temperature and weather. Thus, when referring to the weather you need to use a different pattern.
In Hebrew, "It's far" is Ze rachok. The word for "far" is Rachok. Let’s break it down by syllable and hear it one more time, Rachok. The opposite is "It's near." Ze karov. The word for "near" is Karov.
If you are talking about a person, we need to cover some main adjectives:
"Tall" - Gavoa
"Short" - Namuch
"Fat" - Shamen
"Thin" - Raze
If you are talking about a girl, "She's beautiful" in Hebrew is Hi yafa, On the other hand, if you were talking about a man, you would say Hu yafe.
Now let's look at the negative. In Hebrew, "It's not hot" is Ze lo charif. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ze lo charif. To build the negative form, you just need to add Lo at the middle of the pattern we have just seen.
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“It's dangerous.” - Ze mesukan.
“It's hot.” - Ze cham.
“It's cold.” - Ze kar.
“It's far.” - Ze rachok.
“It's near.” - Ze karov.
“It's not hot.” - Ze lo charif.
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

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HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 06:30 PM
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Hi listeners, in this lesson you've learnt several high frequency adjectives in Hebrew. Which one do you use most often? 

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Friday at 09:52 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


I'm glad I could help.


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Monday at 11:02 PM
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Great tip! Thanks again, Yaara.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 10:26 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


The matter of "et" and "b" is indeed confusing... You will learn more about it in the future, but in the meantime, here is one tip: when the verb belongs to the Hitpa'el form (להתקדם, להתחשב, להתלונן, להסתבך etc.), "et" will never be used.

Don't worry, it will get easier in time :sunglasses:


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Sunday at 12:28 AM
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Thank you, Yaara. a new word "bitui". I notice that a lot of Hebrew expressions use the prefix " b" in front of them. I'll have to use that more than "et".

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 05:18 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Thank you for posting!

When I go to the restaurant, then I use the phrase, “this is not hot?”

"?כשאני הולכת למסעדה, אז אני משתמשת בביטוי "זה לא חריף

The word "phrase" can be translated as פסוקית, but the word פסוקית is used in the field of linguistics, to describe a part of a sentence or a short sentence. In the sentence you translated, the word "phrase" should be translated as ביטוי - "expression" (bitui).

Good job!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Saturday at 10:28 PM
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כשאני הולכת למסעדה אז אני משתמשת את הפסוקית זה לא חריף. When I go to the restaurant, then I use the phrase, "this is not hot?"