Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sherah: Hi everyone, and welcome back to HebrewPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 12 - Opening a Bank Account in Israel. Sherah here.
Amir: שלום I'm Amir. In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use the verb יכול.
Sherah: The conversation takes place at the bank.
Amir: It's between Ella and a banker.
Sherah: The speakers are strangers in a customer service context, so they’ll use informal Hebrew. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

אלה: שלום, אני רוצה לפתוח חשבון בנק.
בנקאי: אין בעיה. איזה סוג חשבון את רוצה לפתוח?
אלה: אני לא בטוחה. אילו סוגים יש?
בנקאי: יש עובר ושב ויש חשבון חיסכון.
אלה: אה... לא חיסכון. אני צריכה חשבון שאפשר לעשות בו פעולות רגילות, ואני צריכה גם כרטיס אשראי.
בנקאי: אז כן, את צריכה חשבון עובר ושב. אני צריך את תעודת הזהות שלך כדי לפתוח לך חשבון.
אלה: אני אצטרך גם צ'קים. אפשר להזמין אותם?
בנקאי: לצערי, תצטרכי לחכות שלושה חודשים עד שתוכלי להזמין צ'קים.
אלה: באמת? תתקשר אליי כדי להזכיר לי?
בנקאי: (צוחק) אני לא חושב שאני אוכל. מה את רוצה להפקיד בחשבון שלך היום?
אלה: יש לי צ'ק מהעבודה שאני רוצה להפקיד.
בנקאי: יופי, אני אסיים את ההפקדה ואזמין את הכרטיס שלך, ואז את יכולה ללכת.
Sherah: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Ella: Hello, I want to open a bank account.
banker: No problem. What type of bank account do you want to open?
Ella: I'm not sure. What kinds are there?
banker: There are checking accounts and savings accounts.
Ella: Ah... not savings. I need an account where I can make ordinary transactions, and I also need a credit card.
banker: So yes, you need a checking account. I need your ID card in order to open an account for you.
Ella: I’ll also need checks. Is it possible to order them?
banker: Unfortunately, you'll need to wait three months until you will be able to order checks.
Ella: Really? Will you call me to remind me?
banker: (laughs) I don't think I’ll be able to do that. Now, what do you want to deposit into your account today?
Ella: I have my work check I want to deposit.
banker: Great, I’ll finish with the deposit and order your card, and then you can go.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sherah: Ella opened a bank account in this lesson’s dialogue. Is that an easy process in Israel?
Amir: Well, Israeli banks are a little different than Western banks.
Sherah: How so?
Amir: Banks are always on alert for terrorist activities, so you may be asked more questions about your transactions, especially if they involve large amounts of money.
Sherah: Do Israeli banks charge fees?
Amir: Yes, there are fees for most transactions, including those performed at the bank or online.
Sherah: That’s unusual! Are credit cards easy to get in Israel?
Amir: Actually, credit cards can be confusing for non-Israelis. Banks offer deferred debit cards to most people.
Sherah: What are those?
Amir: These are cards that have a direct link to a bank account and the transaction amount is debited from the bank account once a month.
Sherah: What are those called in Hebrew?
Amir: כרטיס אשרא. It literally means “credit card.”
Sherah: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Sherah: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Amir: סוג [natural native speed]
Sherah: type
Amir: סוג[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: סוג [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: עובר ושב [natural native speed]
Sherah: checking
Amir: עובר ושב[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: עובר ושב [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: חיסכון [natural native speed]
Sherah: saving
Amir: חיסכון[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: חיסכון [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: כרטיס אשראי [natural native speed]
Sherah: credit card
Amir: כרטיס אשראי[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: כרטיס אשראי [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: תעודת זהות [natural native speed]
Sherah: ID
Amir: תעודת זהות[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: תעודת זהות [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: לצערי [natural native speed]
Sherah: unfortunately
Amir: לצערי[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: לצערי [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: צ'ק [natural native speed]
Sherah: check
Amir: צ'ק[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: צ'ק [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: להזכיר [natural native speed]
Sherah: to remind
Amir: להזכיר[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: להזכיר [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: להפקיד [natural native speed]
Sherah: to deposit
Amir: להפקיד[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: להפקיד [natural native speed]
Sherah: And last..
Amir: הפקדה [natural native speed]
Sherah: deposit
Amir: הפקדה[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: הפקדה [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Sherah: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Amir: עובר ושב
Sherah: meaning "checking." What can you tell us about this, Amir?
Amir: עובר ושב literally means “passing and returning.” It’s also the name of the most common type of bank account.
Sherah: That’s why we defined it as “checking.”
Amir: This type of account allows for withdrawals and deposits.
Sherah: Is there anything else we should know about this type of account?
Amir: The account is called חשבון עובר ושב, but is usually referred to as עובר ושב or by its acronym - עו"ש
Sherah: Can you give us an example using this word?
Amir: Sure. For example, you can say.. יש לי אלף שקל בחשבון עובר-ושב.
Sherah: ..which means "I have a thousand Shekel in a checking account." Okay, what's the next word?
Amir: חיסכון
Sherah: meaning "savings." What can you tell us about this?
Amir: חיסכון is a noun that means “savings.”
Sherah: In English it can mean two things - protecting a limited resource like water, and also the act of keeping money.
Amir: Hebrew is the same. It can mean both of those things in Hebrew.
Sherah: Are there special phrases for it as “saving” money, such as a savings plan?
Amir: Of course! “Savings plan” is תכנית חיסכון, for example, and קופת חיסכון is “piggy bank.”
Sherah: Can you give us an example using this word?
Amir: Sure. For example, you can say.. היא הסבירה את החשיבות של חיסכון במים.
Sherah: .. which means "She explained the importance of saving water." Okay, what's the next word?
Amir: לצערי
Sherah: meaning "unfortunately." What can you tell us about this?
Amir: לצער is made up of the preposition ל meaning "to" or "for," the noun צער meaning "sorrow" and the suffix י, which refers to belonging - "my.”
Sherah: So it literally means “to my sorrow.” The way it’s used, though, is similar to “unfortunately” or “regretfully.”
Amir: Yes. You can conjugate it to refer to someone else’s misfortune too, such as לצערו, which is the third person, singular masculine.
Sherah: When is this used?
Amir: It’s mainly used to decline an offer or to show dissatisfaction.
Sherah: Can you give us an example using this word?
Amir: Sure. For example, you can say.. לצערי, אנחנו לא יכולים לעזור לך בעניין הזה.
Sherah: .. which means "Unfortunately, we can't help you with this matter." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Sherah: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use the irregular verb "to be able to" in the future. First of all, let’s talk about “to be able to” in Hebrew.
Amir: Okay. יכול does mean “can” or “able,” but like in English, it can also mean “may” or “permitted.”
Sherah: But for this lesson, we’ll stick just to the “can” and “able” definitions, right?
Amir: That’s right. יכול is an irregular verb as it has no infinitive form. If we want to say something like “I want to be able to fly,” we have to use the adjective for “can” instead מסוגל
Sherah: Oh, that’s interesting. Are there any other points to look out for? How else is it irregular?
Amir: It doesn’t have an imperative form, and some of the past forms are unusual.
Sherah: How unusual?
Amir: יכול is a verb that has an “o” sound as the second syllable instead of an “a” sound. Verbs like this have past tense forms for “he” and “she” that are the same as their present tense forms.
Sherah: That sounds like it could be confusing...
Amir: It can be, so many Hebrew speakers add “was” before the verb to make it more obvious that it’s past tense. So, it becomes היה יכול or הייתה יכולה.
Sherah: How about in the future tense?
Amir: This is another way that יכול is irregular. Unlike other verbs of the Pa’al stem, the future forms start with an “oo” sound.
Sherah: Is there an example of this from the dialogue?
Amir: לצערי, תצטרכי לחכות שלושה חודשים עד שתוכלי להזמין צ'קים
Sherah: “Unfortunately you’ll need to wait three months until you’ll be able to order checks.”
Amir: תוכלי , is the future tense of יכול in second person, feminine singular.
Sherah: In the lesson notes there is a table that goes through all of the different conjugations.
Amir: Yes, all of the different יכול forms are explained there, so please take a look.
Sherah: Let’s end the lesson with another couple of examples of this in action.
Amir: Okay. This example is spoken by a female - נפלתי ואני לא יכולה לקום.
Sherah: “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up.”
Amir: אני אוכל לשלם לך רק בחודש הבא.
Sherah: “I’ll only be able to pay you next month.”

Outro

Sherah: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Amir: להתראות

29 Comments

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HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Let us know if you have any questions.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:16 AM
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Hi Shelley Levey,


Thanks for posting!


It might be that you used the wrong type of apostrophe (´ instead of '), or that an error of some other kind occurred...

We will look into it 👍


Thanks,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Levey
Monday at 07:54 PM
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My answer for check - צ’ק was marked incorrect. Why?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Friday at 07:02 PM
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Hi Jeannet,


Thanks for commenting and for your question.


The most common is actually "יכלה להיות" (=could have been (feminine)).

The combination "יְכוֹלָה הָיְתָה" can work only with "להיות" after it - " המסיבה יְכוֹלָה הָיְתָה להיות הצלחה גדולה אם לא... " (=the party could be a big sucsess unless...), but in everyday speech we would simply say "יכלה להיות" (or 'yakhal lihiot' ( "he could have been" in masculine) or simply "yakhol lihiot" (יכול להיות = can be...)).


I hope it's clear,


Yours,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Jeannet Benschop
Tuesday at 12:30 AM
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Shalom!

Just wonder if יָכְלָה yachla (she / it could) is also used besides יְכוֹלָה הָיְתָה (haita ye'khola)?

Which one is more common?

Hebrewpod101.com Verified
Monday at 09:40 PM
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Hi Ollie,


We would usually say "צריך" - as in "אני צריך לנקות את הבית", the word "עליי" is a little old-fashioned..


1. fixing - - אני מטעין את מדיח הכלים עם כל סוגי הצלחות מלבד המיוחדות

2. Rephrasing and fixing - העיר כונתה בעבר “ברוקי” אבל השם שונה בגלל האסון שקרה שם

3. Again, you are translating directly from English, ("show up" - להופיע) - but note that many times (maybe even mosty) it simply doesn't work this way. Try to make an effort and use valid Hebrew phrases that are used on the lessons.


I will forward your suggestion about the comment editing - I'm not sure it's possible but it might be a good idea if it is :)


Yours,

Roi

Team Hebrewpod101.com

Shelley
Sunday at 02:44 AM
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Thank you as always for your assistance.

Ollie
Saturday at 06:28 PM
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3. We need to show up at work when we have a rostered shift

עלינו להופיע בעבודה כשיש לנו משמרת מקושטת

Hebrewpod101.com Verified
Saturday at 05:59 AM
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Hi Shelley,


Thanks for the feedback :)


Yes, "It is your responsibility to..." can be a soft translation for "עלייך".


Yours,

Roi

Team Hebrewpod101.com

Ollie
Sunday at 10:06 AM
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Yes, I've noticed that Idit is getting in on the action and it is a pleasure to have her along for the ride :) Two heads are always better than one. ??

- Can I say "עליי לנקות את הבית" I should clean the house? or is "אני חייב לנקות את הבית" more natural? Trying to use the עליך sense in more ways than one; seeking variety here, same as Shelley.


1. I'm stacking the dishwasher with all kinds plates except for the the special ones

אני טעון את מדיח הכלים עם כל סוגי צלחות מלבד המיוחדות

2. The town was once known as "Brookie" but was renamed due to a disaster that happened there

העיר כונתה "ברוקי" פעם אבל זו כונתה מחדש בגלל האסון שקרה לשם

Shelley
Saturday at 11:51 PM
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Shalom Roi,

Idit is helping you with the comment section. Nice to have both of you, but we are all glad that you are still with us. Thank you for those examples. Ali'ch at the beginning of a sentence is almost like saying, It is your responsibility to walk the dog, but maybe a little less harsh? Thank you again.