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Vocabulary

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๐Ÿ˜„ ๐Ÿ˜ž ๐Ÿ˜ณ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜’ ๐Ÿ˜Ž ๐Ÿ˜  ๐Ÿ˜† ๐Ÿ˜… ๐Ÿ˜œ ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ˜ญ ๐Ÿ˜‡ ๐Ÿ˜ด ๐Ÿ˜ฎ ๐Ÿ˜ˆ โค๏ธ๏ธ ๐Ÿ‘

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:30 PM
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Did you like this lesson?

Hebrewpod101.com Verified
Monday at 10:01 PM
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Hi Jeannet,


Thanks for commenting.


Actually, in most cases "ืœื’ืžื•ืจ" and "ืœืกื™ื™ื" are interchangeable. There are some examples where one of which is used in particularly for a term, such as "ืœืกื™ื™ื ืชื•ืืจ" (to finish a uni degree) but even then "ืœื’ืžื•ืจ" would not sound too bad...


In your examples you can use both.


Yours,

Roi

Team Hebrewpod101.com

Jeannet Benschop
Monday at 06:04 AM
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Shalom! A question about the translation of the verb 'to finish'. In this lesson 'lesayem' is used for finishing homework. In another lesson it is used for finishing coffee. I am trying to figure the difference with the verb 'ligmor'. I guess 'ligmor' indicates that something has been completed, like a task, a certain project, a journey, the building of a home, and things like that. Can you confirm if this is correct? And I guess that 'lesayem' refers to f.e. the work of that day, although you may not have completed the whole project?

Which word is best for 'to finish the food' (on the plate), and which word for 'all the food (in the house) has been finished'?

Thanks!

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Friday at 07:42 PM
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Hi Jeannet,


Thank you for your reply.


If you have any further doubts, please let us know :wink:


Cristiane

Team HebrewPod101.com

Jeannet Benschop
Thursday at 02:19 AM
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Thank you Roi, for your explanation! Shalom! Jeannet

Hebrewpod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:38 AM
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Hi Jeannet Benschop,


Actually, the "rule" that you've learnt is nor really correct... there are many different cases for different uses...


Your sentence is actually one that we must understand from context, as ืœื‘ืงืจ has indeed two meanings and the sentence is correct for both of them.


Note that usually one can ืœื‘ืงืจ ื‘ (levaker be) as in ืœื‘ืงืจ ื‘ืžื•ื–ื™ืื•ืŸ.


Yours,

Roi

Team Hebrewpod101.com

Jeannet Benschop
Thursday at 01:26 PM
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Shalom!


I have learned that โ€˜levaker le โ€ฆโ€™ means to visit, and that โ€˜levaker etโ€™ means to criticize.

Would you mind to explain why in this sentence: 'ani mevaker et ha-horim sheli' it says it means 'to visit'?


Thanks for your time!

Jeannet

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 08:54 PM
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Shalom Shelley,


Thank you for your message.


We're glad your doubt was solved.


Feel free to let us know if you have any questions.:wink:


Cristiane

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley
Sunday at 08:42 AM
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I think I understand. The change is always done that way and not just when you are being descriptive for feminine descriptive word phrases. I'll keep my eyes open for them. Thank you.

Hebrewpod101.com Verified
Friday at 11:34 AM
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Hi Shelley,


ืžื›ื•ื ื™ืช ืžืฉืคื—ืชื™ืช = Mechonit mishpachtit (family car)


ื™ืœื“ื” ื™ืจื•ืฉืœืžื™ืช = Yalda yerushalmit (a girl from Jerusalem)


Sorry if it wansw' clear before...

Yours,

Roi

Team Hebrewpod101.com

Jeannet Benschop
Thursday at 10:06 AM
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Shalom!

A question about this sentence: ani mevaker et ha-horim sheli.

I have learned that 'levaker le ...' means to visit, and that 'levaker et' means to criticize.

A bit confused now!

Thanks,

Jeannet