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Lesson Transcript

Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 53 - Renting A Car
In today’s lesson, we'll introduce you to a phrase that will help you get to the places you need to be! In some places, trains and subways are the way to travel, but it's very useful to know how to rent a car, scooter, or bicycle.
In Hebrew, for a male speaker, "I would like to rent a car" is Ani rotze liskor mechonit. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ani rotze liskor mechonit. Now, let’s hear it once again, Ani rotze liskor mechonit. The first words, which we already covered in some previous lessons, Ani rotze means, "I would like." Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time, Ani rotze. Next, we have liskor , which in English is "to rent." To recap here, we have Ani rotze liskor . Literally, this means, "I would like to rent." Last is Mechonit, which is the Hebrew word for "car." All together, we have Ani rotze liskor mechonit. Literally, this means, "I would like to rent a car."
For a women speaker, "I would like to rent a car" is Ani rotza liskor mechonit. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ani rotza liskor mechonit. Now, let’s hear it once again, Ani rotza liskor mechonit. The first words, which we already covered in some previous lessons, Ani rotza means, "I would like." Let's break down this word and hear it one more time, Ani rotza. Next, we have Liskor, which in English is "to rent." To recap here, we have Ani rotza liskor. Literally, this means, "I would like to rent." Last is Mechonit, which is the Hebrew word for "car." All together, we have Ani rotza liskor mechonit. Literally, this means, "I would like to rent a car."
Now we'll look at the words for other vehicles to open up your transportation options. In Hebrew, the word for scooter is Tustus. Let’s break it down by syllable, Tustus. The phrase "I would like to rent a scooter" for a male speaker, is Ani rotze liskor tustus.
For a female speaker, this is Ani rotza liskor tustus.
"Motorbike" in Hebrew is Ofnoa. The phrase "I would like to rent a motorbike" for a male speaker, is Ani rotze liskor ofnoa.
For a female, this is Ani rotza liskor ofnoa.
If you're renting something, it's also important to know when you must return it! Therefore, we're giving you a phrase you can use to make sure you return it on time.
In Hebrew, "Until when can I return the car?" is Ad matai Afshar lehachzir et hamechonit? Let’s break it down by syllable, Ad matai efshar lehachzir et hamechonit? Now, let’s hear it once again, Ad matai efshar lehachzir et hamechonit? The first two words Ad matai mean, "Until when." Let’s break down this words and hear them one more time, Ad matai. Next, we have Efshar, which in English is "can." Then we have Lehachzir, which means, "return." Then we have the preposition Et, which means, "the." All together, we have Ad matai efshar lehachzir et...? Literally, this means, "Until when can I return the...?" Finally, we have the word for the thing that we want to return, which in this case is the Mechonit "car." So all together, we have Ad matai efshar lehachzir et Hamechonit? Please note that we attach the preposition Ha to the noun Mechonit.
Finally, you may want to return it at a different location. In Hebrew "Can I return at (location)?" is Efshar lehachzir be(location)? Let's imagine you want to return it in Tel Aviv. We should have Efshar lehachzir betel aviv? Let’s break it down by syllable, Efshar lehachzir betel aviv? Now, let’s hear it once again, Efshar lehachzir betel aviv? The first word Efshar means, "can I." Then we have Lehachzir, which in English is "return." Then we have the preposition Be meaning, "at" before and attached to the location we want. To recap here, we have Efshar lehachzir be. Literally, this means, "can I return at?" Finally, we have the location Tel Aviv "Tel Aviv." All together, we have Efshar lehachzir betel aviv?
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“I would like to rent a car.”(for male speaker) - Ani rotze liskor mechonit.
“I would like to rent a car.”(for female speaker) - Ani rotza liskor mechonit.
“I would like to rent a scooter/moped.”(for male speaker) - Ani rotze liskor tustus.
“I would like to rent a scooter/moped.”(for female speaker) - Ani rotza liskor tustus.
“I would like to rent a motorbike.”(for male speaker) - Ani rotze liskor ofnoa.
“I would like to rent a motorbike.”(for female speaker) - Ani rotza liskor ofnoa.
“Until when can I return the car?” - Ad matai efshar lehachzir et hamechonit?
“Can I return at Tel Aviv?” - Efshar liskor betel aviv?
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

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HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 06:30 PM
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Hi listeners, in this lesson you've learnt how to rent a car, a scooter and a motorbike in Hebrew, could you please share with us where you would like to get to and by what?

HebrewPod101.com
Monday at 02:26 AM
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Hi kris,


Thanks for posting and for bringing this issue to our attention


You are correct, "motorcycle" is written "אוֹפַנּוֹעַ" in Hebrew, and should be pronounced "ofano'a". Saying "ofno'a" instead of "ofano'a" is a very common error in Hebrew, but it is still defined as incorrect... I'm forwarding this issue.


Best,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

kris
Tuesday at 06:40 PM
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Shalom,


re: the translation of motorcycle: shouldn't it be ofanoa. That's what I thought it was and the niqud in the pdf agrees with that.

The speaker and the romanization say ofnoa?


Toda


Kris

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 08:30 PM
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Hi Tom,


Thanks for commenting!


To say "Until when can I return the car?" we could translate directly as "עד מתי אני יכול להחזיר את המכונית?" (ad matai ani yakhol lehachzir et hamechonit?)


Your suggestion is also perfectly valid - "When is the car due to be returned?" (מתי יש להחזיר את המכונית?)


Hope that helps :)

Yours,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Tom
Saturday at 11:31 AM
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Until when can I return the car? in English has the sense that after that date, I cannot return the car (it is now mine, permanently). Does it have that sense in Hebrew? I think we would say "When is the car due to be returned?" unless we have 10 days to return it, and after that it is ours.

Lana
Wednesday at 12:02 PM
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In this phrase: עד מתי אפשר להחזיר את המכונית


we have את and ה. Why do we need both of them in the sentence? I thought ה meant something like "this"

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 10:35 AM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Yes, you are right. We are continually growing and trying to improve, so thank you for pointing out the mistakes so we can fix them.

The Hebrew verb system is indeed very complicated, so if you weren't exhausted - that would mean you are probably doing something wrong :wink:

Keep up the good work!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Monday at 12:29 AM
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Thank you Yaara, I believe I got the colors and numbers in agreement in my sentence which is always hard for me and made all my errors on the last sentence! Thank you for your help. Your explanation was clear and the exhausting part is that your lesson raises questions in my mind. The lesson without the errors would be far less confusing. I do not understand why there are still errors and you have been in operation for six years. Why aren't the lessons doublechecked? Does the internet change the lessons through transmission? This site has tremendous value, but would be better and less confusing without the errors. The students make enough on their own.

The verbs are complicated. I'll have to reread your explanation again and try to absorb all your wonderful information.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 06:41 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


I almost forgot the fun part :wink:

.שלום, אנחנו רוצים לשכור מכונית צהובה, שלושה טוסטוסים, שני אופנועים שחורים, וארבעה אופניים ירוקים

?עד מתי אפשר להחזיר אותם בגליל, אולי מחרתיים

the day after tomorrow = מחרתיים (proper pronunciation: mochoratayim; common pronunciation: machratayim).

Well done!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 06:36 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Thank you for posting.

You are right, the line by line audio does not correspond to the speaker. it should be "liskor", לִשְֹכּוֹר, and not "lehaskir". The difference between the two is that the first one - liskor - means to rent from someone, and the second, lehaskir, means to rent something of yours to someone else.

Also, In the second to last line the speaker is saying ”return” - "until when can I return the car". You are right, the notes are not correspondent to the audio: the written sentence is ”until when can I rent the car”. Both forms are fine.

You are also right about the vocabulary - "להחזיר" should be written in the infinitive verb, "to return", and not "return".

The difference between lachzor - לחזור and leachzir - להחזיר, is that the first one (lachzor) means to go back, to return somewhere - when a person returns somewhere. the second, lehachzir, means to give back, to return something (or someone - but someone else). Examples:

:לחזור

הוא החליט לחזור הביתה - he decided to come back (/to return) home

הגיע הזמן לחזור לעבודה - it's time to go back (/to return) to work


:להחזיר

היא לא רצתה להחזיר את הכסף - she didn't want to give the money back

הוא הלך להחזיר את הילדים מבית הספר - he went to bring the kids back from school


And finally, the Hebrew word for bicycle is ofanayim - אופניים (plural, masculine).

I hope this explanation wasn't too exhausting :sweat_smile:


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Thursday at 06:05 AM
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שלןם אנחנו רוצים לשכור מכונית צהובה, שלושה טוסטוסים, שני אופנועות שחורים, וארבעה אופנים ירוקים. עד מתי אפשר להחזיר את זה בגליל אולי היום אחרי מחר?

Hello, we would like to rent a yellow car, three scooters, two black motorcycles and four green bicycles. Until when is it possible to return these to Galilee, perhaps the day after tomorrow?