Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 50 - Expressing Symptoms
Once you are in the pharmacy, you will need to explain how you feel in order to let the pharmacist give you the right medicines. In today’s lesson, we'll work on explaining symptoms so you can get the proper treatment and any medicine you may need.
Let's try to make a list of all the possible things you might need.
In Hebrew, "cold medicine" is, Trufa leitztanenut. Let’s break it down by syllable and hear it one more time, Trufa leitztanenut.
"A cold medicine please" in Hebrew is Trufa leitztanenut bevakasha. Let’s break it down by syllable, Trufa leitztanenut bevakasha.
The first word Trufa means, "medicine." Next, we have Leitztanenut, which means "for cold." Please note that the preposition Le, which means "for," is attached to the word Itztanenut, which means "cold." Let’s hear it once again, Itztanenut. Lastly, we have Bevakasha "please." All together, we have Trufa leitztanenut bevakasha, which literally means, "A medicine for the cold please."
Let's see how to explain your symptoms.
In Hebrew, "I have a headache" is Yesh li ke'ev rosh. Let’s break it down by syllable, Yesh li ke'ev rosh. Now, let’s hear it once again, Yesh li ke'ev rosh. The first words Yesh li mean, "I have." Let’s hear them one more time, Yesh li. Next, we have Ke'ev, which literally means, "pain." Last, we have the word Rosh, which in English means, "head." All together, we have Yesh li ke'ev rosh. Literally, this means, "I have pain of head," and in this case we translate it as "I have a headache."
A different way to say you are in pain, for example in your stomach, is Yesh li ke'ev beten. Let’s break it down by syllable, Yesh li ke'ev beten. Now, let’s hear it one more time, Yesh li ke'ev beten. This is a very straightforward sentence. Yesh li means, "I have," Ke'ev means, "pain," and finally, Beten means,"stomach." The only thing that changes is the word Beten "stomach." Let’s break it down this word, Beten. Now, let’s use entire sentence again, Yesh li ke'ev beten.
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“A cold medicine, please.” - Trufa le-tzinun bevakasha.
“I have a headache.” - Yesh li ke'ev rosh.
“I have a stomachache.” - Yesh li ke'ev beten.
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

12 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Let us know if you have any questions about this Survival Phrases lesson!

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 04:35 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi shaun,


Thanks for commenting!


צינון and הצטננות are simply synonyms - they reflect 2 ways to structure a verb in Hebrew.


Thanks again for your question and enjoy learning Hebrew with us!


Yours,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

shaun
Sunday at 10:18 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

It looks like a few different people asked the question about צִנּוּן vs הִצְטַנְּנוּת.


Can we get an answer on the differences? Is one more formal? Is one more slang/colloquial?

Hebrewpod101.com Verified
Sunday at 08:22 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Dave Novick,


Thanks for your post! Ill forward that for fixing.


Thanks,

Roi

Team Hebrewpod101.com

Dave Novick
Sunday at 11:26 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

In the first sentence, the speaker uses "הצטננות" for cold which is what is used in the lesson notes, while "צינון" is written. I believe they should match.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Friday at 09:43 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Shelley Lynn,


I'm happy to help :wink:

Keep challenging yourself, don't worry about the mistakes. You are doing an excellent job :thumbsup:


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Sunday at 08:30 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Thank you Yaara. I understand about two words having the same meaning. Yes, you are right, pull a muscle and sprain an ankle is more commonly used in English than spraining a muscle but is sometimes used. I appreciated that you wrote both. I should have written sprain my muscles to make it sound more general. How interesting that" rarely" is "sometimes far" and "frequently" is "sometimes close". The dictionary didn't give the full word, I believe, when I looked it up or I somehow missed it. I also had some spelling errors and guessed incorrectly on the verbs. Ah so I didn't need the "et" and "ha" in that sentence and then the sentence would be more general. Thank you again as I search my way through the language.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 11:22 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Shelley Lynn,


The two terms are simply two different ways to say the same thing. I can't really say how this happened, but sometimes it does. You can use either one.

"Rarely I need medicine for a cold, but frequently, I sprain my muscle and need to visit a physical therapist".

Did you mean "sprain my ankle" or "pull my muscle"?

.לעתים אני צריכה את התרופה לצינון, אבל לעתים אני נוקעת את הקרסול שלי [/מותחת את השריר] וצריכה לבקר פיזיותרפיסט

By the way, "אני צריכה את התרופה" means "I need *the* medicine". לעתים means "sometimes"; If you want to say "rarely" you can say לעתים רחוקות, and "frequently" will be לעתים קרובות.

Very good job!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Monday at 07:41 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

עיתים אני צריכה את התרפה לציון אבל לעתים אני נקוע את השריר שלי וצריכה לבקר פיזיותרפיסט Rarely I need medicine for a cold, but frequently, I sprain my muscle and need to visit a physical therapist.

Shelley Lynn
Monday at 12:59 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Thank you Yaara and team for trying to improve this marvelous site. What is the difference between the two words for "cold" that are used?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 05:05 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Shelley Lynn,


Thank you for posting.

You are right, The Romanization for “was” in the sentence "the medicine tasted bad" in the notes and in the expansion does not correspond to the tense of the Hebrew ”was”. It says "לתרופה הייתה טעם רע", when it should be "לתרופה היה טעם רע". Also, the romanization is "la-trufa haya taam mar", and it should be "la-trufa haya taam ra".

About the word "cold" - the speaker is using the word "hitz'tanenut", while in the written materials (except for the transcript part) it says "tzinun". both are correct, they are just different forms of the same word.

Thank you for letting us know, we've fixed those.


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com