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Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 47 - I'm A Vegetarian
Today’s lesson is not only for all of the vegetarians out there, but it's also for anyone with an adversity to a particular food! There are many reasons a person won't eat a particular food, and there may be instances when communicating this is necessary. Today, we'll go over some phrases to make sure you don't get any unwanted surprises on the plate.
As we have seen already, In Hebrew, there are different ways to say things depending on the gender of the speaker and listener. In Hebrew, for a male speaker, "I am vegetarian" is Ani tzimchoni. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ani tzimchoni. Now, let’s hear it once again, Ani tzimchoni. The first word Ani means, "I am." Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time, Ani. Next, we have Tzimchoni, which in English is "vegetarian." To recap here, we have Ani tzimchoni. Literally, this means, "am vegetarian."
For a female speaker, "I am vegetarian" is Ani tzimchonit. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ani tzimchonit. Now, let’s hear it once again, Ani tzimchonit. The first word Ani means, "I am." Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time, Ani. Next, we have Tzimchonit, which in English is "vegetarian." To recap here, we have Ani tzimchonit. Literally, this means, "am vegetarian."
Another way you can communicate that you don't eat a particular food is by saying just that!
In Hebrew, for a male speaker, "I don't eat meat" is Ani lo ochel basar. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ani lo ochel basar. Now, let’s hear it once again, Ani lo ochel basar. The first word Ani means, "I." Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time, Ani. Next, we have Lo, which in English is "no." Then we have the verb Ochel, which means, "eat." Let’s break it down this word and hear it one more time, Ochel. Last, we have the word Basar, which in English means, "meat." Let’s break it down this word and hear it one more time, Basar. All together, we have Ani lo ochel basar. Literally, this means, "I don't eat meat."
For a female speaker, in Hebrew, "I don't eat meat" is Ani lo ochelet basar. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ani lo ochelet basar. Now, let’s hear it once again, Ani lo ochelet basar.
The first word Ani means, "I." Let’s break it down this word and hear it one more time, Ani. Next, we have Lo, which in English is "no." Then we have the verb Ochelet, which means, "eat." Let’s break it down this word and hear it one more time, Ochelet. Last, we have the word Basar, which in English means "meat." Let’s break it down this word and hear it one more time, Basar. All together, we have Ani lo ochelet basar. Literally, this means, "I don't eat meat."
We can use this sentence pattern for other kinds of food by simply changing just one word! So let's look at some other possibilities. Let's try "cheese," which in Hebrew is Gvina. Let’s break it down by syllable, Gvina. Now, let’s hear it one more time, Gvina. Now let's try the phrase with this word. "I don't eat cheese" in Hebrew, for a male speaker, is Ani lo ochel gvina. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ani lo ochel gvina. Now, let’s hear it one more time, Ani lo ochel gvina.
For a woman speaker, this is Ani lo ochelet gvina. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ani lo ochelet gvina. Now, let’s hear it one more time, Ani lo ochelet gvina.
If you want to make sure some food doesn't have an ingredient you can't or don't want to eat, you should simply ask about it. For example, if you want to make sure a meal doesn't have meat, you should ask, Yesh beze basar? The first word Yesh means, "have." Then you have Beze, which means, "in this." Finally, we have Basar, which we already know means, "meat." Let’s break it down and hear it one more time, Yesh beze basar?
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“I am vegetarian.”(male speaker) - Ani tzimchoni.
“I am vegetarian.”(female speaker) - Ani tzimchonit.
“I don't eat meat.”(male speaker) - Ani lo ochel basar.
“I don't eat meat.”(female speaker) - Ani lo ochelet basar.
“I don't eat cheese.”(male speaker) - Ani lo ochel gvina.
“I don't eat cheese.”(female speaker) - Ani lo ochelet gvina.
“Does this have meat?” - Yesh beze basar?
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

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HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hello HebrewPod101.com listeners!

Are any of you a vegetarian?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 11:41 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Glad to be of help!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Sunday at 08:49 PM
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Thanks again, Yaara.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 11:55 AM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Yes, The sentence should be in a present tense because it is a general sentence. Think of it as a translation of this sentence: "Sometimes I am vegetarian, when I can't find kosher meat and chicken". If you want to use the future tense it will make the sentence more specific (something like: Sometimes I will be vegetarian, when I will not be able to find kosher meat and chicken), and you will have to use the future tense for the whole sentence:

.לפעמים אני אהיה צמחונית, כשלא אוכל למצוא בשר ועוף כשרים

(I) will be able: אוכל - uchal.

Please let me know if you have any more questions.


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Monday at 01:38 AM
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Thank you Yaara, great to know why Hebrew speakers use "oaf" instead of tarnegolet. I was trying to use the future in the second half of the sentence because, the action did not happen yet.. I put the aleph on yichol for will be able to. So from your explanation, I can do it in present tense because it is a general sentence and not specific? I also see some spelling errors. Thanking you in advance.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 04:03 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Thank you for posting. You are right, on page 4 of the notes, the sentence הוא צמחוני כבר שלוש שנים should be translated as "he has been a vegetarian for three years" and not "I have been a vegetarian for three years". It's fixed now.

As for your sentences:

Sometimes I am vegetarian, when I will not be able to find kosher meat and chicken.

.לפעמים אני צמחונית, כשאני לא יכולה למצוא בשר ועוף כשרים

You wrote it in the present tense, which is correct. You could use another tense, but then you will have to use it for the whole sentence. I changed תרנגולת to עוף because Hebrew speakers use the word תרנגולת for the animal and the word עוף for the food (like the difference between "cow" and "meat" in English).

Well done!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Sunday at 12:01 AM
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Sometimes I am vegetarian when I will not be able to find kosher meat and chicken.

לפעמים אני צמחונית כשאני לא איכלה למצוע את בשר וטרנגולת כשרים Can I also write the 2nd half of this sentence using the present tense? Sometimes I am vegetarian when I can't find kosher meat and chicken?

Shelley Lynn
Saturday at 11:38 PM
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Hello team,

In the first sentence of the expansion and the notes, the subject doesn't agree with the translation, that is a change to I and he is needed.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Friday at 12:00 PM
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:wink::mrgreen:

Which is your favourite non-vegetarian/vegetarian dish?


Cheers,

Neha/HebrewPod101.com

Ailiaheva
Thursday at 04:53 PM
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Yes. Cool that there are others. Thank you.

B. Schall
Tuesday at 03:30 AM
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I am not vegetarian, because I do not chew my cud, nor do I have cloven hooves.