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Lesson Transcript

Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 45 - Do You Have An English Guide?
In this lesson, we will introduce you to a crucial phrase for travelers who are interested in learning more about the tourist attractions they're going to visit. Learning about the history and the cultural significance of places you visit can be just as rewarding as seeing them.Today, we'll cover "Do you have an English information guide?"
In Hebrew, "Do you have an English information guide?" is Yesh lachem alon meyda beanglit? Let’s break it down by syllable, Yesh lachem alon meyda beanglit? Now, let’s hear it once again, Yesh lachem alon meyda beanglit? As we have seen in previous lessons, the first word Yesh means, "have." Let’s hear it one more time, Yesh. Next, we have Lachem, which in English means, "to you." Let’s break it down by syllable, Lachem. Let's look at the next words. We have Alon meyda, which in English is "information guide." Let’s break it down by syllable, Alon meyda. Now, let’s hear it one more time, Alon meyda. Last, we have the word Beanglit, which in English means, "in English." All together, we have Yesh lachem alon meyda beanglit? Literally, this means, "Do you have a guide in English?"
Of course, if you want to practice Hebrew and buy a Hebrew guide, you can simply accomplish this by asking, Yesh lachem alon meyda?
To ask for a different language, we can just replace the word for "English" with any other word for a language and it works just fine. Let's try "French." In Hebrew, "Do you have a French information guide?" is Yesh lachem alon meyda betzarfatit? The only thing that changes is the thing you are looking for. In this case, it's Betzarfatit. Let’s break it down this word and hear it one more time, Betzarfatit.
Let's try now with a Japanese guide! It's common for information guides even to be in Japanese because a huge number of Japanese tourists visit Israel every year and at every time of the year. "Do you have a Japanese information guide?" is Yesh lachem alon meyda beyapanit? "In Japanese" in Hebrew is Beyapanit. Let’s break it down this word and hear it one more time, Beyapanit. All together, we have Yesh lachem alon meyda beyapanit? Piece of cake!
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“Do you have an English information guide?” - Yesh lachem alon meyda be-anglit?
“Do you have a French information guide?” - Yesh lachem alon meyda be-tzarfatit?
“Do you have a Japanese information guide?” - Yesh lachem alon meyda be-yapanit?
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

13 Comments

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HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Getting the English and Hebrew version is also a great way to compare and contrast and learn a bit more about Hebrew.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 06:40 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


I’m glad I could help!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Tuesday at 10:25 PM
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Oh I looked again. Sorry, my previous comment was incorrect. You made two sentences and "Hiyu is the verb "was" Yes, it's very clear now how you did it and the meaning is also clear. Thank you for your time.

Shelley Lynn
Tuesday at 10:19 PM
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A lot of repetition to make the sentence clear. In English , we just refer to the preceeding noun or person and would not repeat the subject pronoun, like "Hiyu". Thank you for your help explaining this detail.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 10:11 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


You can use the word Shneihem, but the sentence will have to change. Shneihem means "the two of them", so the sentence will look like this:

לקבל את שניהם בעברית ובאנגלית

Which means "to get them both / both of them in Hebrew and English". It isn't clear who are "them", or what language they're in - both languages? one in Hebrew and one in English? this is not a clear sentence. If you want to use the word Shneihem, you need to clarify what you are talking about, and make sure that what you say applies to the both of them. For example:

.היה מועיל לקבל את עלוני המידע. שניהם היו בעברית וגם באנגלית

"It was useful to get the pamphlets. Both of them were in Hebrew and English".

I hope this answer was helpful!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Saturday at 08:27 PM
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Thank you, Yaara. Your translation is very clear. Could I say to receive the two of them using "sneihem?"

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Friday at 09:49 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Thank you, that is a good way to put it - "'gam' repeated gives equal status to both the Hebrew and English".

If you want to say that there were two pamphlets, you will say:

"...לקבל את שני עלוני המידע, בעברית ובאנגלית..."

But that is a whole different story :smile:

Keep up the good work!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Sunday at 09:09 PM
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Thank you for the clarification, Yaara. I'm beginning to understand the smichut better and the use of "ha" I understand now that gam repeated gives equal status to both the Hebrew and English. The use of both of them implies two separate pamplets, one in English and one in Hebrew as opposed to a combined pamphlet of both Hebrew and English. This may not be as acceptable in Hebrew as it is in English or I may need to phrase it differently to be understood. The question didn't specify if it was a combined pamphlet or two separate brochures.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 12:17 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


The infinitive of the verb ”to agree” is להסכים - le'haskim. This verb belongs to the Hif'il form, that gets a Mem in the present tense. The ”ha” has to follow after the word ”et”, but in the Smichut construct it is added to the second word. As I explained in a comment in lesson 54, Smichut is a construct that combines two nouns to create a third noun, for example:

מזג (temper) + אוויר (air) = מזג אוויר (weather), or in this case: עלון (brochure) + מידע (information) - עלון מידע (information sheet / written guide).

The use of "shnehem" is wrong here because it literally means ”both of them”, so it will mean "receiving the information guide both of them in Hebrew and English", which is pretty much nonsense. I understand your comment about it being youthful to repeat "also" twice, but in this particular sentence you want to emphasize the fact that there are two languages. However, you can definitely say it once - בעברית *וגם* באנגלית. You repeat the word "gam" only when you want to stretch the fact that there are a few options that are equal, because otherwise it may sound like the first one is the main one and the others are the "other options". I hope this answer was helpful.


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Monday at 02:06 AM
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Thank you, Yaara-So many changes! Would you please write the infinitive" to agree"? I see it takes the mem in the present tense. It appears to be ok not to have the"h" follow directly after the word"et". Is the use of" both of them", snahem, incorrect for Hebrew in this sentence? in English, it is considered inexperienced or rather youthfull to repeat also twice, Gam. I do see that Hebrew speakers repeat it in this manner.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 03:14 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Thank you for posting.

Good job on the sentence you wrote, it is very long and complicated.

I agree that receiving the information guide both in Hebrew and English is very helpful.

.אני מסכימה שלקבל את עלון המידע גם בעברית וגם באנגלית זה מועיל מאוד

The Hebrew equivalent of "guide" (person) is מדריך - madrich. This word, like it's English equivalent, can mean both a written guide and a human guide. You are right, the lesson refers to a guide pamphlet.

Keep up the good work!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com