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Lesson Transcript

Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 44 - Admissions
There is so much to do and see in Israel, and there are times when access to some must-see places requires an admission ticket. So today, we're going to work on getting you through the gates as we'll look at buying tickets. In Hebrew, "ticket" is Kartis. Let’s break it down by syllable, Kartis. Now, let’s hear it one more time, Kartis.
In Hebrew, "one ticket please" is Kartis echad bevakasha. Let’s break it down by syllable, Kartis echad bevakasha. Now, let’s hear it once again, Kartis echad bevakasha. The first word Kartis means, "ticket." Let’s hear it one more time, Kartis. Next, we have Echad, which in Hebrew is "one." To recap here, we have Kartis echad. Literally, this means "a ticket." Let's look at the next word, which you know very well, Bevakasha, and it means, "please." So all together, we have Kartis echad bevakasha. Literally, this means, "A ticket please."
We will work on getting tickets for the rest of the party now. Let's recap numbers from one to ten.
Please note that counting things in Hebrew can be a bit tricky as objects in Hebrew have gender.
First, we will list the masculine form of the numbers, and then the feminine form.
Male/Female
0- efes
1- echad/achat
2- shnayim/shtayim
3- shlosha/shalosh
4- arba'ah/arba
6 - shisha/shesh
5- chamisha/chamesh
7- shiv'ah/sheva
8- shmona/shmone
9- tish'ah/tesha'
10- asara/eser
"Three tickets, please" in Hebrew is Shlosha kartisim bevakasha. Let’s break it down by syllable, Shlosha kartisim bevakasha. Now, let’s hear it once again, Shlosha kartisim bevakasha. The first word Shlosha means, "three." Let’s hear it one more time, Shlosha. Next, we have Kartisim, which is plural for "ticket." To recap here, we have Slosha kartisim. Literally, this means, "three tickets." Let's look at the next word, which you've just seen, Bevakasha, and it means, "please." So all together, we have Shlosha kartisim bevakasha. Literally, this means, "Three tickets, please."
"Five tickets, please" in Hebrew is Chamisha kartisim bevakasha.
Very often, you may be asked to show your ticket not only at the entrance, so keep these admissions with you until you leave the place you are visiting. They will ask you, Efshar lirot kartis bevakasha? This means, "Can I see your ticket, please?" The first word is Efshar "can I." Let’s hear it one more time, Efshar. Then you have the verb Lirot "to see." Next, you have Kartis "ticket." Last, we have the word Bevakasha "please." Let’s break it down by syllable and hear it one more time, Efshar lirot kartis bevakasha? So all together we have, Efshar lirot kartis bevakasha? This literally means, "Can I see your ticket, please."
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“One ticket, please.” - Kartis echad, bevakasha.
“Three tickets, please.” - Shlosha kartisim, bevakasha.
“Five tickets, please.” - Chamisha kartisim, bevakasha.
“Can I see your ticket, please?” - Efshar lirot et ha-kartis shelcha, bevakasha?
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

10 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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What must-see places will you go when you arrive in Israel?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Friday at 11:51 AM
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Hi Dave Novick,


Thank you for pointing that out.

We will fix it soon.


Sincerely,

Ofelia

Team HebrewPod101.com

Dave Novick
Sunday at 11:08 PM
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Unfortunately, the second Hebrew sentence in the dialogue plays an English translation when you click on the speaker to play it. I've noticed this on a number of dialogues.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 08:45 AM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Thank you for leaving a reply to Yaara!:smile:


Have a nice day!

Ofelia

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Monday at 02:21 AM
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Yaara,thank you-it was a poetic or rather wistful sentence. Wish I was there.

As usual I have trouble with the verbs. hmmm-I got the" et "right.

Am I thinking in Hebrew and hearing English? Could the error have fixed itself? What a mystery-I can't find it either? Was it in a similar reading? lol

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 02:54 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Thank you for posting. You are right about the notes - number six is missing, masculine and feminine. It is:

6 - shisha/shesh and we added it.

About the line by line audio - where is Number two (3 tickets please) in English instead of Hebrew? I am sorry, I didn't find it...

As for your lovely sentence:

I would like to walk slowly in the old city and to see the people and to smell the air.

.ארצה ללכת לאט בעיר העתיקה, לראות את האנשים ולהריח את האויר

As you can see, the sentence was almost perfect - you were right about the "et", and the order is perfect. This is probably the common phrasing, but you could also start the sentence with ”in the old city" - that would be good too.

Again, good job!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Thursday at 10:10 PM
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I would like to walk slowly in the old city and to see the people and to smell the air.

ארצה לחולך לאט בעיר העתיקה ולרות את האנשים ולרוח את האויר. Thanks for your help. I'm guessing on the infinitives and the " ets". and verbs in general. I'm thinking that the more common phrasing would be to start the sentence with " in the old city', I would like...?

Shelley Lynn
Thursday at 09:36 PM
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Hello team, In the notes, it would be helpful to see the numbers written in Hebrew. Also number six is missing. masculine and feminine. The line by line audio is usually in Hebrew. Number two, 3 tickets please, is currently in English.

I am enjoying this series. It is very practical and thus, useful.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 10:48 PM
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Shalom Mark,


Thank you so much for the support!

We truly appreciate it,


Keep up the good work,


Lenny

Team HebrewPod101.com

Mark
Sunday at 05:36 AM
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Another good lesson! Thank you guys!