Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 43 - Renting A Mobile Phone
In this lesson, we will cover renting a cell phone, an indispensable tool for the modern day traveler! In Israel, you can rent a phone at many locations, including the airport. It may be more convenient just to pick one up there. There are many reasons to pick up a cell phone. With the number of public phones decreasing due to the lack of use, renting a cell phone is becoming an indispensable part of one's travels.
If you're coming from the States, cell phones won't work because US phones are on a different frequency than European GSM.
In order to rent a phone, you will need to leave a deposit.
In Hebrew, there are different ways to say things depending on the gender of the speaker and listener.
In Hebrew, "I would like to rent a cell phone" if you are a man is Ani rotze liskor pelefon. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ani rotze liskor pelefon. The first words Ani rotze mean, "I would like." Let’s break them down by syllable and hear them one more time, Ani rotze. Next, we have liskor, which in Hebrew is "to rent." To recap here, we have Ani rotze liskor. Literally, this means, "I would like to rent." Let's look at the next word Pelefon, which literally means, "cell phone." Let’s break it down by syllable and hear it one more time, Pelefon. All together, we have Ani rotze liskor pelefon. Literally, this means, "I would like to rent a mobile phone."
If you are a woman, this is Ani rotza liskor pelefon. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ani rotza liskor pelefon. The first words Ani rotza mean, "I would like." Let’s break them down by syllable and hear them one more time, Ani rotza. Next, we have liskor, which in Hebrew is "to rent." To recap here, we have Ani rotza liskor. Literally, this means, "I would like to rent." Let's look at the next word Pelefon, which literally means, "cell phone." Let’s break it down by syllable and hear it one more time, Pelefon. All together, we have Ani rotza liskor pelefon. Literally, this means, "I would like to rent a mobile phone."
Currently, there may be instances when you need to rent more than one phone. For instance, you may want a phone for each member of the family. In this case, you would add the number of phones you want and change the noun ending to plural:
For a male speaker, "I would like to rent two phones" is Ani rotze liskor shnei pelefonim.
For a female speaker, "I would like to rent two phones" is Ani rotza liskor shnei pelefonim.
For a male speaker,"I would like to rent three phones" is Ani rotze liskor shlosha pelefonim.
For a female speaker,"I would like to rent three phones" is Ani rotza liskor shlosha pelefonim.
Two important questions related to your plan are, "Are incoming calls free?" and "How much are calls to the U.S.?" "Are incoming calls free?" is Sichot nichnasot ze chinam? Let’s break it down by syllable, Sichot nichnasot ze chinam? Now, let’s hear it once again, Sichot nichnasot ze chinam? Sichot is a plural noun and it means, "calls." Nichnasot is a plural, feminine adjective meaning, "incoming." Next, we have Ze, which is a preposition meaning, "this." Finally, we have Chinam, which is the Hebrew adverb for "free."
"How much is a minute to the U.S?" is Kama ola daka le'amerika? Let’s break it down by syllable, Kama ola daka le'amerika? Now, let’s hear it once again, Kama ola daka le'amerika? The word for "United States" is Amerika. Let’s break down this word and here it one more time, Amerika. To ask about another country or destination, simply substitute the word for the U.S.
In the case of England, the phrase would be Kama ola daka le'angliya?
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“I would like to rent a cell phone.”(male speaker) - Ani rotze liskor pelefon.
“I would like to rent a cell phone.”(female speaker) - Ani rotza liskor pelefon
“I would like to rent two phones.”(male speaker) - Ani rotze liskor shnei pelefonim.
“I would like to rent two phones.”(female speaker) - Ani rotza liskor shnei pelefonim.
“I would like to rent three phones.”(male speaker) - Ani rotze liskor shlosha pelefonim.
“I would like to rent three phones.”(female speaker) - Ani rotza liskor shlosha pelefonim.
“How much are calls to the U.S.?” - Kama ola daka le'amerika?
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

17 Comments

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HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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What kind of mobile phone would you like to rent?

Dave Novick
Sunday at 11:10 PM
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While the written dialogue uses לשכור for "to rent", the associated audio is using להשכיר. I believe these should be consistent.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Friday at 09:50 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Exactly :smile:

I'm glad I could help!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Sunday at 09:45 PM
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Thank you, Yaara, I can leave out the "ha" before pink to match my translation and make the sentence more general.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 01:05 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


I will be sure to let Lenny know :smile:

"What is the cost of a minute to Brazil, please? Are incoming calls free? I would like to rent two pink phones please."

.כמה עולה דקה לברזיל, בבקשה? שיחות נכנסות זה חינם? אני רוצה לשכור שני פלאפונים ורודים, בבקשה

Great job!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Monday at 10:33 AM
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כמה עולה דקה לברזיל בבקשה ? שיחות נכנסות זה חינם? אני רוצה לשכור שני פלאפונים הורודים בבקשה What is the cost of a minute to Brazi, pleasel? Are incoming calls free? I would like to rent two pink phones please.

Shelley Lynn
Monday at 02:32 AM
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Thank you Yaara, I am less confused now and I like seeing the sentence written in Hebrew. Where is Lenny? We love you, but do miss her. Please let her know.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 02:23 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Thank you for posting.

You are right, the spoken lesson for the verb “to rent” does not correspond to the written lesson. As Lenny commented below, the written lesson is correct and the spoken is incorrect. Thank you for your understanding.

As for the question “Are incoming calls free?" - the Hebrew sentence is:

?שיחות נכנסות זה חינם - sichot nichnasot ze chinam?

chinam = free of charge (that is - "free" only in the sense of "does not cost money").

I hope this is helpful!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Thursday at 08:52 PM
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Hello team, from the comments you must now realize that the spoken lesson for the verb "to rent" does not correspond to the written lesson. Is there a way to correct that? From Lenny's comment below, I have deduced that the written lesson is correct for these particular sentence applications and that the spoken is incorrect for this application. Please confirm if this is so.

Also. It would be helpful to see the sentence in Hebrew that is in the notes: "Are incoming calls free?' Perhaps you could add that to the notes without too much difficulty? Would you please write it in Hebrew for me in the comments section? Thank you.

hebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 11:11 PM
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Shalom Pedro,


Thank you for your comment.

להשכיר lehaskir is used when you are renting TO someone.

And

לשכור kiskhor is used when you are renting FROM someone.

אני משכיר את הדירה שלי ( meaning, I am the owner and receiving rent fee)

אני שוכר את הדירה שלי (meaning, I am renting from the owner and paying rent fee)


Happy Hebrew learning.


Lenny

Team HebrewPod101.com

Pedro
Thursday at 03:23 PM
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Shalom xaverim


In this lesson we have two versions of to rent. Lehaskir and Liscor, the first is spoken the second is written which is correct or are they both correct?


Any help appreciated, Toda


Pedro