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Lesson Transcript

Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 41 - Foreign Exchange
Exchanging money in Israel is quite convenient. One can exchange money at airports, banks, or withdraw money from an ATM. Rates applied when withdrawing money from an ATM are likely to be quite good. However, when using an ATM, it is advisable to make one large withdrawal as both the local bank and your home bank may charge fees. So first things first, let's find a location that will exchange money.
First, let's review some previous phrases and patterns we've already covered.
In Hebrew, "Is there an ATM near here?" is Yesh po kaspomat basviva? Let’s break it down by syllable, Yesh po kaspomat basviva? Now, let’s hear it once again, Yesh po kaspomat basviva?
Now to ask for a bank, we can just replace the word for ATM with the word for bank and the phrase works just fine. "Is there a bank near here?" is Yesh po bank basviva? Let’s break it down by syllable, Yesh po bank basviva? The only things that change are the thing you are looking for. In this case, Bank which you might have guessed, in English means "Bank." Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time, Bank. To recap, we have Bank. All together, we have Yesh po bank basviva?
For times when there is neither a bank nor an ATM, you can ask, "Where can I exchange currency?" In Hebrew, this is Eifo efshar leachlif kesef? Let’s break it down by syllable, Eifo efshar leachlif kesef? Now, let’s hear it once again, Eifo efshar leachlif kesef? The first word Eifo means, "where." Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time, Eifo. Then we have Efshar, which in English is "can." Then you have Leachlif ("to exchange"). Last, we have the word Kesef, which in English means, "money." To recap here, we have Eifo efshar leachlif kesef? Literally, this means, "Where can I change money?"
Exchanging currency is pretty straightforward. (You need to fill out some forms and then present the amount you want exchanged.) One extremely useful phrase is "Smaller denominations please." It's usually beneficial to have smaller amounts of currency on you for paying for the bus fare, taxi fare, and so on.
In Hebrew, "Smaller denominations please" is Shtarot ktanim bevakasha. Let’s break it down by syllable, Shtarot ktanim bevakasha. Now, Let’s hear it once again, Shtarot ktanim bevakasha. The first word Shtarot means, "paper money." Next, we have Ktanim, which means, "small." Finally, you have Bevakasha "please." All together, we have Shtarot ktanim bevakasha. In English, this means, "In small denomination please."
Finally, you can also use the phrase "Break this please" to indicate you would like smaller amounts of the currency. In Hebrew, "Break this please" is Tifrot li et ze bevakasha. Let’s break it down by syllable, Tifrot li et ze bevakasha. Now, let’s hear it once again, Tifrot li et ze bevakasha. The first word Tifrot means, "to break." Let’s hear it one more time, Tifrot. Next, we have Li, which means, "to me." Then we have the words Et ze, which in English means, "this." Last, we have the word Bevakasha "please." All together, we have Tifrot li et ze bevakasha. Literally, this means, "Can you change them?"
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“Is there an ATM near here?” - Yesh po kaspomat basviva?
“Where can I exchange currency?” - Eifo efshar leachlif kesef?
“Smaller denominations please.” - Shtarot ktanim bevakasha.
“Break this please.” - Tifrot li et ze bevakasha.
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

7 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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How much cost an orange in your country?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 01:34 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


I am very happy to help, especially to such a hard-working student :smile:

Keep up the good work!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Tuesday at 09:43 PM
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Thank you for your help and for your encouragement, Yaara.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 12:01 AM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Great job!


?כמה עולה תפוז (ala - עלה is past; ole - עולה is present)

.זה עולה פחות משקל (than - מ)

.יש לי רק שטרות

.תפרוט לי את זה בבקשה


Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Sunday at 06:05 AM
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כמה עלה תפוז ?. זה עלה פחות שקל. How much does an orange cost? It costs less than a shekel. יש לי רק שטרות

I have only bills. Break this for me please. תפרוט לי את זה בבקשה

hebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 11:58 PM
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Shalom Pedro,


Thank you for your comment.

I guess that by "מנדרים" you mean "מנדרינות"... (mandarin)

:smile:

Other then that perfect sentences well done!


Happy Hebrew learning,


Lenny

Team HebrewPod101.com

Pedro
Wednesday at 08:00 AM
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שלום חברים

אני לא קונה תפוזים אני קונה מנדרים

אני קונה 2.25 קילו של מנדרים עם 6 דולרים בדרך


תודה


פדרו