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Lesson Transcript

Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 34 - How Do You Say This In Hebrew?
For today, we're going to need a word, as we're going to cover "How do you say (something) in Hebrew?" So let's get started right away!
The Israelis are famous for their olive oil, so let's assume that you want to buy some but have no idea what to call it in Hebrew! What do you do now? Of course, you ask with Survival Phrases!
In Hebrew, "How do you say olive oil in Hebrew?" is Hech omrim olive oil beivrit? Let’s break it down by syllable, Hech omrim olive oil beivrit? Now, let’s hear it once again, Hech omrim olive oil beivrit? The first word Hech means, "how." Let’s break it down this word and hear it one more time, Hech. This is followed by Omrim, which is the present plural form of the verb Lomar "to say." Next, we have the word you say in your own language, so in this case "olive oil," and finally you have Beivrit "in Hebrew." Please note that the proposition Be "in" is attached to the noun Ivrit "Hebrew." Let’s break it down by syllable and hear it one more time, Beivrit.
So all together, we have Hech omrim olive oil beivrit? Literally, this means, "How you say olive oil in Hebrew?"
Not to leave you hanging, "olive oil" in Hebrew is Shemen zait.
You can also use this expression without using any English. To accomplish this, you can use the expression "How do you call this in Hebrew?" In Hebrew, "this" is Ze. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ze. Now, let’s hear it once again, Ze. So, in Hebrew, "How do you call this in Hebrew?" is Hech korim leze beivrit? Let’s break it down by syllable, Hech korim leze beivrit? Now, let’s hear it once again, Hech korim leze beivrit? The structure is the same as the previous sentence except that in place of "olive oil," we have the demonstrative adjective Ze "this" with the proposition Le "to," which is attached to it, and we have changed the verb to Korim, which is the plural present form of the verb Likro "called." All together, we have Hech korim leze beivrit? This is a phrase you can use while pointing at something.
In Hebrew, Ze means both "this" and "that." Thus, "How do you call that in Hebrew?" is also Hech korim leze beivrit? Exactly the same as "How do you call this in Hebrew?"
But wait, it's your Israeli friend's birthday and you want to wish him/her a happy birthday but you don't know how to say it. Let's try to ask, Hech metargemim happy birthday leivrit? "How do you translate happy birthday in Hebrew?" Let’s break it down by syllable, Hech metargemim happy birthday leivrit? Now, let’s hear it again, Hech metargemim happy birthday leivrit? The first word is Hech and it means, "how." Let’s break it down by syllable, Hech. Then you have Metargemim, which is the present form plural of the verb Letargem "to translate." Let’s break it down by syllable and hear it one more time, Metargemim. Then the word or expression you wish someone to translate. Finally, you have Leivrit, which you have previously seen means "to Hebrew." So all together, we have Hech metargemim happy birthday leivrit?
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“How do you say olive oil in Hebrew?” - Hech omrim olive oil beivrit?
“How do you call this/that in Hebrew?” - Hech korim leze beivrit? / Hech korim leze beivrit?
“How do you translate happy birthday in Hebrew?” - Hech metargemim happy birthday leivrit?
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

29 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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This is a phrase you'll use for the rest of your Hebrew-learning life!

What other words would you like to learn in Hebrew?

Carol
Tuesday at 01:15 PM
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Shalom,

I see the three ways that you expressed asking for how to say something in Hebrew. When someone says ech tagidu_____(Apple or whatever word they are trying to say) (don’t know how tagidu is spelled in Hebrew), it does not sound like it came from the infinitive l’omar or Korim or l’etargem. What would the infinitive?


Thanks,

Carol

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:47 PM
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Hi Mireille Marie Antoinette DuBois,


Thank you so much for posting this great comment!


Haha this is so great! Mazal Tov for your birthday! ❤️️❤️️❤️️


We're so happy to hear that you enjoy learning Hebrew so much! Please let us know in case you have any questions or any wishes so that we can make sure it stays this way 😁😁😄😄


Warm wishes,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Mireille Marie Antoinette DuBois
Wednesday at 03:22 AM
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I love you all so much. It's like you knew it's my birthday and planned this lesson just for me. Bediha! Lomed Ivrit is one of the great joys of my life!

HebrewPod101.com
Thursday at 11:53 PM
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Hi kris,


Thank you very much for posting your questions


The correct preposition in Hebrew for both "לקרוא" and "translate" is "ל", and therefore the correct way to ask "how does one call that?" will be: "איך קוראים לזה בעברית?" ("Eykh kor'im le-zeh be-Ivrit?), and "how to translate ... into Hebrew" will be "איך מתרגמים ... לעברית?" ("Eykh metargemim ... le-Ivrit?).


That said, actually, the most natural way to ask that question will be simply: "how do you say ... in Hebrew" - and the preposition here IS finally "ב" - "Eykh omrim ... be-Ivrit?" (איך אומרים ... בעברית).


Happy to assist :)


Best,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

kris
Wednesday at 03:14 AM
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Shalom,


Would "Hech korim ET ZE beivrit" and "Hech metargemim happy birthday BEivrit" be wrong?


Toda


Kris

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:39 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Love is always appropriate :wink: And on a more serious note: in Hebrew, the word Love is used only when talking about, well, love. The word Happy is the right equivalent only in the case of the sentence we spoke of,

”I would love to” = "...אני אשמח ל". To be precise, these two words are not really equivalent - these two sentences are.

About the word "rather": the word "L’madai" actually means "quite", or "enough", or "fairly". The source of the translation mistake was that למדי can mean "rather", but only in the sense of "rather nice", "rather warm", as in "warm enough / quite warm".

About your last - and important! - question:

Have a nice day = שיהיה לך יום נחמד, or more common: שיהיה לך יום יפה

Your sentence was almost perfect, the only problem was present tense: יש לך יום נחמד means "you have a nice day" - as in "now". שיהיה means something like "let there be".


!שיהיה לך יום נחמד


Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:21 PM
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Shalom Pedro!


I am glad I could help :smile:

Again, you are right - the word אשמח comes from the word שמח! As I wrote in my answer, it literally means "I will be happy (to)...". The right pronunciation is ESMAKH, and since you speak Spanish, you have a better chance to pronounce it correctly :wink:


Keep up the good work!

Sincerely,

יערה

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Saturday at 11:49 PM
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Thank you Pedro for all the information. Have a nice day! Yaara, how would I say that in Hebrew? Would I use the command form of " to be" ! יש לך יום נחמד

Pedro
Thursday at 10:58 AM
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Shalom Shelley


Eteacher is a different entity out of Israel. Some of their courses are accredited by The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.


Lehitraot


Pedro

Shelley Lynn
Wednesday at 10:17 PM
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Thank you for your help Yaara, on " I would love to"- I see that I used the word love and you used the word happy. When is the word love-appropriate? I understand that the use of happy is an expression and not appropriate to use love in my sentence, but I did think they were equivalent. So any more light you can shed on this would be appreciated.

Interesting about the word rather- the word I used, I got from morphix which doesn't explain the nuances. What does L'madi actually mean?