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Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 31 - Directions
In today’s lesson, we'll introduce you to directions that will help you find the place you are looking for. Previously we introduced, "Is there a place near here?" and "Where is there a something?" But while we can now ask, we haven't addressed understanding the answer? In this lesson, we're going to work on understanding what someone tells us. We'll go over basic directions. First, we have "Go straight."
But first we have to remember that in Hebrew there are different ways to say things depending on the gender of the speaker and listener. Thus, for a male in Hebrew, "Go straight" is Lech yashar. Let’s break it down by syllable, Lech yashar. Now, Let’s hear it once again, Lech yashar.
First, we have Lech, which means, "you go," and the word Yashar, which means, "straight," follows Lech yashar. Literally, this means "Go straight."
For a female, in Hebrew, "Go straight" is Lechi yashar. Let’s break it down by syllable, Lechi yashar. Now, Let’s hear it once again, Lechi yashar.
First, we have Lechi, which means, "you go," and the word Yashar, which means, "straight," follows. Literally, this means "Go straight."
Let's look at the next expression to help us turn. Let's cover "Turn right," which in Hebrew for a man is Tifne yemina. Let’s break it down by syllable, Tifne yemina. Now, Let’s hear it once again, Tifne yemina. The first word Tifne comes from the verb Lifnot, meaning, "to turn." We follow this with Yemina "right." All together, we have Tifne yemina.
For a woman, this is Tifni yemina. Let’s break it down by syllable, Tifni yemina. Now, Let’s hear it once again, Tifni yemina. The first word Tifni comes from the verb Lifnot, meaning, "to turn." We follow this with Yemina "right." All together, we have Tifni yemina.
Now let's work on "Turn left." In Hebrew for a man, "Turn left" is Tifne smola. Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time, Tifne smola.
For a woman, "Turn left" is Tifni smola. Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time, Tifni smola.
Let's try now with "Turn right at the traffic light," which in Hebrew for a man is Tifne yemina baramzor.After Tifne yemina ("Turn right"), which we have just seen, you have Baramzor ("at the traffic light"). Let’s break it down and hear it one more time, Tifne yemina baramzor. First, you have Ba attached to the noun that follows it, which in English is "at the." Then you have Ramzor ("traffic light"). Let’s use entire sentence now, Tifne yemina baramzor.
For a woman, "Turn right at the traffic light" is Tifni yemina baramzor. After Tifni yemina "Turn right," which we have just seen, you have Baramzor "at the traffic light." Let’s breat it down and hear it one more time, Tifni yemina baramzor. First, you have Ba attached to the noun that follows it, which in English is "at the." Then you have Ramzor "traffic light." Let’s use entire sentence now, Tifni yemina baramzor.
"It's on the right" in Hebrew is Ze miyemin. Let’s break it down by syllable, Ze miyemin. Now, let’s hear it once again, Ze miyemin. The first word Ze means, "It is." Finally, we have the word Miyemin, which combined form the proposition Mi "on" in English attached to the noun that follows it, and the word Yemin "right." So all together, we have Ze miyemin.
"It's on the left" in Hebrew is Ze mismol. The only difference is the word Smol in place of Yemin. Let’s break it down by syllable, Smol. Now, let’s hear it once again, Ze mismol.
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“Go straight.”(for a male) - Lech yashar.
“Go straight.”(for a female) - Lechi yashar.
“Turn right.”(for a male) - Tifne yemina.
“Turn right.”(for a female) - Tifni yemina.
“Turn left.”(for a male) - Tifne smola.
“Turn left.”(for a female) - Tifni smola.
“Turn right at the light.”(for a male) - Tifne yemina baramzor.
“Turn right at the light.”(for a female) - Tifni yemina baramzor.
“It's on the right.” - Ze miyemin.
“It's on the left.” - Ze mismol.
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

16 Comments

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HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Is it on the left side or the right side?

Hebrewpod101.com Verified
Friday at 02:30 AM
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Hi Anny Loera,


Thanks for the feedback!


Happy learning :)


Roi

Team Hebrewpod101.com

Anny Loera
Tuesday at 08:48 AM
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great lesson

Hebrewpod101.com Verified
Sunday at 10:54 PM
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Hi Mike,


Yes you are right! there are a lot of roundabouts in Israel...!

Glad you enjoy learning Hebrew and I hope that the lessons are helpful :)


The Hebrew translation for roundabout is "כיכר" or "כיכר תנועה".


Glad to help!

yours,

Roi

Team Hebrewpod101.com

Mike
Friday at 06:46 AM
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I have driven a rental car in Israel twice in the past few months (I'm an American). I'm enjoying learning Hebrew. This is important....what is the Hebrew word for "roundabout". I did get lost a few times and found myself at gas stations and this word roundabout would have been helpful. There are lots of roundabouts in Israel!

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 01:12 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


I'm glad I could help :smile:


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Tuesday at 09:16 PM
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Thank you again, Yaara. Very Helpful.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:42 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Good questions. First of all, the word kvish refers to an asphalt road for cars. I changed it in your sentence because it sounds better in Hebrew, but it wasn't a mistake.

You understand correctly - you can say from the right or left (without side) using the “m”, but if you want to say ”side” you use “b” - betsad.


Thank you for your comments!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Saturday at 11:33 PM
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Thank you Yaara, Most helpful. I noticed that you changed cvish to rehov is that because cvish is more of a dirt path where you usually find nature instead of supermarkets? If I understand correctly, you can say from the right or left( without side) using the "m" but if you want to say" side" you use "b" tsad ok. got it. I like how you used " along "which probably can also be translated as" for the length of". I don't remember seeing it used that way. It's new for me. Thank you.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 05:43 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Thank you for posting.

"The post office is on the right side on the way home. The supermarket is on the left side of the street. Turn right at the light then go straight for two streets.

.הדואר הוא מימין בדרך הביתה. הסופרמרקט הוא בצד שמאל של הרחוב. תפני ימינה ברמזור ואז לכי ישר לאורך שני רחובות

You can use “b” when talking of the side - you can say בצד ימין, "on the right side" (side=צד), but not "b’yamin".

"for two blocks" - there is no word for "blocks" in Hebrew. For directions you will usually use "streets" or "turns".

You could say לאורך שני בניינים = (literally:) "along two buildings".


Hope this answer was helpful!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Friday at 10:44 PM
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הדואר הוא מימין בדרך הביתה הספרמרקט חוא משמול של הכביש תפני ימינה ברמזור אז לכי ישר בשביל שתי רחובות The post office is on the right side on the way home. The supermarket is on the left side of the street. Turn right at the light then go straight for two streets. Is it incorrect to say in the right side using "b"? ie b'yamin? Also, how would I say for two blocks. Thank you in advance.