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Lesson Transcript

Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 27 - Riding The Rails 3
In the previous lesson, we covered how to ask for and buy a train ticket. Once you have established the destination, it is time to select the type of seat you want. Normally in Israel, you can choose between Machlaka rishona "first class" and machlaka shniya "second class." Let’s break them down by syllable, Machlaka rishona. Now, Let’s hear them again, Machlaka rishona.
The first word Machlaka means, "class, department." The second word Reshona ("first") is a numeral adjective we use in concordance with the feminine noun.
Then, we have Machlaka shniya. Let’s break it down by syllable, Machlaka shniya. After Machlaka this time, you have Shniya in place of Rishona, a feminine numeral adjective.
Let's now imagine you want to buy a first class ticket. This time the destination will be Be'er sheva. "A first class ticket to Be'er sheva, please," in Hebrew is Kartis echad lemachlaka rishona lebe'er sheva, bevakasha.
The structure is the same as you have just seen in the previous lesson. We just add Machlaka rishona "first class". Let’s break down this word, Kartis echad lemachlaka rishona lebe'er sheva, bevakasha. Now, Let’s hear the whole phrase, Kartis echad lemachlaka rishona lebe'er sheva, bevakasha.
In your trips to Israel, it could happen that you will take the train and then you will go back to the city in which you're staying. If you wish to buy a round trip ticket, how could you accomplish this in Hebrew? "I would like a round-trip to Be'er sheva, please." Kartis haloch vashov lebe'er sheva bevakasha. Let’s break it down by syllable and hear it one more time, Kartis haloch vashov lebe'er sheva bevakasha. This structure is similar to the previous one. We have only exchanged Machlaka rishona "first class" with the word Haloch vashov "go &return", or in this case, "A round trip ticket."
To convey the English definition "round trip" in Hebrew, we say Haloch vashov. This is made up of the combination of the two verbs Haloch, "to go" and Vashov "to return." Let’s break down this words and hear them one more time, Haloch vashov.
Finally, if you just need a simple one-way ticket, you can accomplish it by asking, "I would like a one-way ticket to Be'er sheva, please." In Hebrew, this is Kartis kivun echad lebe'er sheva, bevakasha.
As you can see, we use the exact same structure of the previous phrase but add Kivun echad in place of Haloch vashov. Kivun echad means, "one way." Let’s break down this words and hear the entire sentence once again, Kivun echad
“A first class ticket to Be’er sheva, please.” - Kartis echad lemachlaka rishona lebe’er sheva, bevakasha.
“I would like a round-trip ticket to Be’er sheva, please.” - Kartis haloch vashov lebe’er sheva bevakasha.
“I would like a one-way ticket to Be’er sheva, please.” - Kartis kivun echad lebe’er sheva, bevakasha.
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

18 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Have you ever tried the Intercity train?

Shelley
Sunday at 08:47 AM
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Shalom Roi and Idit, In the expansion sentence under first in the vocabulary-She finished first in the race. Is it correct to have " et H" in that sentence before the word race? Can you substitute "b" in front of race?


Also the expansion sentences under direction are both for the female listener in the audio. Please change parenthesis to say male speaker) or change the audio of one sentence to be for a male listener. Thank you.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 10:17 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


You’re welcome :smile:


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Saturday at 08:48 PM
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lol to your Ding Ding Ding! Thanks again!

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Friday at 11:33 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


You are right, Lemida is a noun (in Hebrew: שם עֶצֶם, or just שם), and the N stands for Nekeva - female, in this case "feminine". And about the Tav at the end of the word - another right answer, ding-ding-ding!

Keep up the good work :smile:


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Tuesday at 05:25 AM
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love your wish to me! Thanks, Yaara. I looked up learning " lmedah" in morphix and it says shem with a nun after it. does that mean noun? I thought the "nun" meant feminine, perhaps without the "shem"?

I understand that the ending tav means "of", the learning of Hebrew. Thanks again.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 08:21 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


תודה על האיחולים (Thank you for the wishes)

or

תודה על שאיחלת לי יום יפה (Thank you for wishing me a nice day)

In Hebrew there are two kinds of wishes: wishes you have for yourself, that usually remain a secret (wishing to be a singer, wishing for a pool in the back yard) and things you wish other people (good health, happy holidays, a nice day). The first kind is Mish'ala - משאלה (plural: mish'alot). The second kind is Ichul - איחול (plural: Ichulim). The first one is a noun, but the second one can also be a verb: to wish = לאחל. For example:

I - איחלתי (Ichalti - past), מאחל/ת (Me'achel/et - present), אאחל (a'achel - future).

So now I will wish you happy Hebrew learning!

!עכשיו אני אאחל לך למידת עברית שמחה


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Monday at 03:37 AM
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Thank you for wishes for a nice day. תודה למשאלות ליום יפה

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 12:41 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,

I am glad I could help. Learning a new language takes a lot of patience and practice, and I'm sure your Hebrew will keep improving - don't be afraid to make mistakes, it's a part of the process!

!יום יפה גם לך


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Tuesday at 02:26 AM
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Love your explanation, Yaara! Hope you have patience with me while I try to remember and incorporate this. I may do it wrong many more times till I get it right from memory. I did write it down. שהיה לך יום יפהHave a nice day.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:41 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


First of all, I should make an important clarification: When translating everyday phrases, we can't be too literal because the translated sentence may come out nonsensical; so I use the equivalent phrase, which gives the same feel even though it is not a word-for-word translation; This means that the word "rotza" is right for this sentence, but it cannot replace the word "like" in any other situation. I understand it can be very confusing.

I understand why "rotza" seems direct to you, and indeed, modern Hebrew is a very direct language.

You can definitely put Rotzah in the future tense and say "I will want to buy". the only difference is that your suggestion is very formal and polite, so it is very rarely used.


Please let me know if you have any more questions!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com