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Lesson Transcript

Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 25 - Riding The Rails 1
In this lesson, we are going to cover how to get on the train.
As you have learned in the previous lessons, in Israel you can buy tickets from the bus driver. However, for the train you buy the tickets from the machines located at the station. Just in case you get too confused and have to ask the station attendant, we have prepared this lesson for you!
Now let's see how to get our train ticket. As you can remember from the previous lessons covering how to get a bus ticket, we can accomplish this by asking, "Excuse me, a train ticket please." Slicha, kartis larakevet bevakasha.
Therefore, you have Slicha "Excuse me", then Kartis "a ticket", then Larakevet, which literally means, "to the train." Last, we have the word Bevakasha, which you should already know by now. So, Let’s break down this words and hear them once more, Slicha, kartis larakevet bevakasha. Let’s repeat the entire sentence now, Slicha, kartis larakevet bevakasha.
Our location for this lesson will be Haifa. Let's imagine you need to go from Tel Aviv to Haifa and you need to ask what line you have to take to get there. You can accomplish this by asking, "Excuse me, what line do I need to take for Haifa?" Slicha, eize kav megia lecheifa?
Let's see this sentence word by word. First, you have the usual Slicha followed by Eize kav, which is Hebrew for "What line." This is made up by Eize "what/which", followed by the word Kav "line". Let’s break down this words and hear them one more time, Eize kav. Next, we have Megia,which in English means, "arrive." Finally, you have the place name, which in this case is Cheifa. In English though, it's called "Haifa." Please note that to the word Cheifa we attached the proposition Le, which in English means, "to." Let’s do everything one more time, Slicha, eize kav megia lecheifa?
A possible answer to your question could be Hakav ha'adom megia lecheifa "The red line goes to Haifa." This sentence is structured very similar to English. Hakav is the word for "the line."After this, we have Ha'adom, which means, "the red." Then, we have Megia, which we saw in the previous example, means "arrive." Finally, we have the place name, which in this case is Cheifa, and in English we say, "Haifa."Please note again, as we saw in the previous example, that to the word Cheifa we attached the proposition Le, which in English means, "to." Let’s repeat all of that one more time, Hakav ha'adom megia lecheifa.
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“Excuse me, a train ticket please.” - Slicha, kartis larakevet, bevakasha.
“What line do I need to take for Haifa?” - Slicha, eize kav megia lecheifa?
“The red line goes to Haifa.” - Hakav ha’adom megia lecheifa.
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

15 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Where would you go by train in Israel?

HebrewPod101.com
Saturday at 11:26 PM
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Hi Renato,


Thank you very much for your positive feedback.


Let us know if you have any questions.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team HebrewPod101.com

Renato Morello
Saturday at 12:40 AM
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I would like to congratulate the gentleman who is the teacher not only for this audio lesson, but for all lessons. He is really good. 👏👏

Hebrewpod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:43 AM
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Hi Jessica,


Thanks for your comment!


Good answer! Be'er sheva is a nice city and has a train connection :)


Yours,

Roi

Team Hebrewpod101.com

Jessica
Friday at 02:48 AM
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הייתי הולכת לבאר שבע


I would go to Beer'sheva.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 07:48 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


You are very welcome! keep enjoying Hebrew :wink:


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Thursday at 10:51 AM
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Thank you again, Yaara.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 02:16 PM
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Hi Shelley Lynn,


Thank you for posting. As I wrote in an answer to your question in a different lesson, the verb linsoa/lisoa can mean either "to ride", "to go" or "to travel":

אני נוסעת לאירופה - I'm traveling to europe

אני נוסעת לעבודה ברכבת - I'm riding the train to work

אני נוסעת לטיול - I'm going on a trip


Please let us know if you have any more questions!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Thursday at 11:13 PM
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Thank you for your encouragement. I am happy I got the tense correctly on the word prefer. "Rather than" is translated as "from that" . When would you use the verb to travel? l'soah must mean to ride. In English we interchange them, but it doesn't appear that you do that in Hebrew. Thanking you in advance.

hebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:30 PM
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Shalom Shelley Lynn,


Thank you for your comment.

Well done!

?אני חושבת שאעדיף לסוע ברכבת מאשר באוטובוס. איזה קו מגיע לתל אביב מחיפה


Happy Hebrew learning,


Lenny

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Saturday at 10:51 AM
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I think that I would prefer to travel by train rather than by bus אני חושבת שאהעדיף לנסע ברכבת אז באוטובוס איזה קו Which line arrives to Tel Aviv from Haifa? מגיע לטל אביב מחיפה