Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 23 - Riding The Bus 2
In the previous lesson, we covered how to get a bus ticket. Now that you have your ticket, get ready to jump on your bus and start the tour. But wait a moment, before you get on the bus you need to confirm if it's going to your destination. We can accomplish this by asking, Slicha, lean haotobus haze nosea? "Excuse me, where is this bus going to?" You have Slicha, which you know very well by now. Then you have Lean, which means, "to where." Next, you have Haotobus, which is "the bus." Then we have Haze, which is the preposition "this." Last, we have Nosea, which literally means, "drive" in English, but in this connotation it means "go." Let’s break down this sentence and hear it one more time, Slicha, lean haotobus haze nosea? Another way of asking if the bus is going past somewhere is to ask, Slicha, derech eifo haotobus haze nosea?
Here, we have just replaced Lean "to where" with the words Derech eifo "thorough which way."
Let's imagine now that you are in Tel Aviv and you have to go to Shuk hakarmel "The Karmel market," a very famous market in Tel Aviv. What would you ask the bus driver? Another way of asking if the bus stops is by saying, Slicha, haotobus haze otzer beshuk hakarmel? "Excuse me, does this bus stop at the Karmel market?" In this sentence, the structure is a little different. After the Slicha, we start with the Haotobus, which means, "the bus." Then we have Haze, which means "this." Next, we have the verb Otzer, which in English means, "to stop." Last, we have the name of the place where we want to stop, which in this example is Shuk hakarmel. Please note that the preposition Be, which in English means "in/at" is attached to the place name. Thus, Beshuk hakarmel means, "At the Karmel market." Let’s break it down by syllable and hear it one more time, Slicha, haotobus haze otzer beshuk hakarmel?
Asking the driver if he stops somewhere is, Slicha, ata otzer beshuk hakarmel? Again, all that changes is that we replace Haotobus haze ("this bus") with Ata meaning "you (in this situation, the driver)." "Excuse me, do you stop at The Karmel market?"
Imagine that you are visiting a city for the first time, you have no idea of the distances between your favorite destinations, and you need to ask the bus driver how long the bus takes. Kama zman ze le (your destination)? "How long does it take to...?"
Kama in Hebrew is "How much." Then we have the word Zman, which in English means, "time."When the word Zman follows the word Kama, together it becomes Kama zman, which in English we can translate as "How much time," or "How long." Then you have Ze, which means, "it" or "this," which you have seen in the previous lessons. Next, we have the preposition Le, which in English means, "to" or "for" attached to your destination. Finally, all you have to do is add the place you want to go! It's as simple as that! Let’s break down this words and hear them one more time, Kama zman ze le ?
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“Excuse me, where is this bus going to?” - Slicha, lean haotobus haze nosea?
“Excuse me, thorough which way is this bus going?” - Slicha, derech eifo haotobus haze nosea?
“Excuse me, does this bus stop at the Karmel market?” - Slicha, haotobus haze otzer beshuk hakarmel?
“How long does it take to get to...?” - Cama zman ze le…?
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

18 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Does anyone have a bus adventure story to share with us?

Shelley
Sunday at 05:48 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Shalom team," thorough" and "through" have different meanings in English. Please use "through" in your translation of the second line of the dialogue and in the grammar notes. The grammar notes also uses "to stop" which implies the infinitive instead of " stop". Please remove "to", 13 lines down from top in 2nd large paragraph. The Hebrew is conjugated and not in the infinitive form. Thank you.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 10:15 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Juliana Michelle,


Thank you for posting!

זה לוקח כל היום להגיע מאליפלט לאילת. זו נסיעה ארוכה מאוד

(It takes the whole day to travel from Elifelet to Eilat. It is a very long drive).

Good job :smile:


Sincerely,

Yaara,

Team HebrewPod101.com

Juliana Michelle
Friday at 05:55 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

זה לוקח כול היום לטייל מאליפלת לאילת. זה זמן מאוד נוסע. (It takes the whole day to travel from Elifelet to Eilat. It is a very long drive).

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 09:29 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Shelley Lynn,


The difference is actually very easy to explain, since it is in fact the same word. the verb has only one form in all of the tenses, I through they. The only anomaly occurs in the infinitive form of the verb - Linsoa/Lisoa.

I hope this explanation helped you!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Tuesday at 12:23 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Yaara. Those two verbs may mean the same but they have different letters and so are pronounced differently as you said and I can use them interchangeably as you also said. Would you please conjugate both for me side by side in the present tense, I through they. Thanks for your help.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:05 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Shelley Lynn,


I am not sure I understand your request - what are the verbs you are referring to? If you are talking about Linsoa/Lisoa - I am sorry, I did not make myself clear enough. these two are merely different ways to pronounce the same verb, which can mean either "to go" or "to travel".

Is this what you were talking about? please let me know if you have any other questions!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Thursday at 10:42 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Ahh-so glad that "Day of the year" is not an error! I understand how the abbreviation came about Those two verbs are so similar! Would you mind showing the four forms of both verbs in present tense? Thank you. Yaara.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 01:49 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Shelley Lynn,


The verbs "lisoa" and "linsoa" are the same verb - it can be pronounced in two different ways. It is used like the verb "ride", so it can be used for buses, trains, cars and any other vehicle. It can also mean "to go" or "to travel" as in "going on a trip"; you can say אני נוסעת לעבודה ברכבת (I ride the train to work), and you can also use it in אני נוסעת לטיול (I am going on a trip).

About the word "Anniversary": It is literally translated as "day of the year", יום שנה; however, in Engish it usually refers to a marriage anniversary. In Hebrew, you have to specify the kind of the anniversary: a marriage anniversary would be יום שנה לנישואים, or in short - יום נישואים.


I hope you found this helpful!

sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley Lynn
Thursday at 10:31 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Thanks Lenny, I can see that the translation of "Who has" can be" that is" and it still works in the sentence. I am not familiar with the verb l'soah. Is that used only for buses? Trains? Cars? Isn't lnsoah used for cars?

I see I need to leave out the hey in front of friend and finally, I like your use of anniversary. I'm fairly sure that the flashcards have it as day of the year. Is that incorrect? Please correct if it is. I am a little surprised that you have been in operation for 6 years and there are still so many errors. Why? it's really hard to unlearn if you have learned it incorrectly.

hebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:20 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Shalom Shelley Lynn,


Thank you for posting.

In Hebrew The verb for "riding" a bus is לסוע

The verb לרכב is used for things you actually physically sit on and ride such as a bike, bicycle, horse etc.

Anniversary = יום נישואין in Hebrew.

. אני אסע באוטובוס לשוק בירושלים לקנות מנורה וצלחת סדר בשביל חברה שלי שיש לה יום נישואין


Happy Hebrew learning,


Lenny

Team HebrewPod101.com