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Lesson Transcript

Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 12 - Restaurant Part 2
In the last lesson, we learned how to get a table at a restaurant, but my dear listeners please know that because of the popularity of Israeli food, it can be difficult to get a seat especially on the weekends. The best thing to do without a doubt is to make a reservation for the time you want to go and eat. In today's lesson, we'll cover making a reservation in a restaurant.
Normally, if you are a male and you make a phone call in order to make a reservation for the evening, you would say Ani rotze leazmin shulhan lehaerev, bevakasha. Literally, Ani means, "I." We follow this with Rotze, which in English means, "I want." Let’s break it down by syllable, Rotze.
Leazmin is the infinitive form of the verb "to book" and literally means, "to order." Let’s break it down by syllable, Leazmin. We follow it with Shulhan, meaning, "a table." Let’s break it down by syllable, Shulhan. Next, we have Lehaerev, which is the equivalent of "for the evening." Finally, we have Bevakasha, which in English means, "please." Let’s recap the phrtase one more time, Ani rotze leazmin shulhan lehaerev, bevakasha.
If you are a female, you would say Ani rotza leazmin shulhan lehaerev bevakasha? Literally, Ani means, "I." We follow this with Rotza, which in English means, "I want." Let’s break it down by syllable, Rotza.
Leazmin is the infinitive form of the verb "to book" and literally means, "to order." Let’s break it down by syllable, Leazmin. We follow it with Shulhan, meaning, "a table." Let’s break it down by syllable, Shulhan. Next, we have Lehaerev, which is the equivalent of "for the evening. Finally, we have Bevakasha, which in English means, "please." Let’s recap the phrase one more time, Ani rotza leazmin shulhan lehaerev bevakasha?
Normally, they'll ask you how many people are in your party and the time of the reservation. In Hebrew, "For how many people?" is Lekama anashim? Let’s break it down by syllable, Lekama anashim?
Now let's imagine you are a party of two. In Hebrew, you would use Shnei anashim, which in English means, "two people."
Finally, let's see how they will ask you the time of your reservation. Le'eizo sha'a? "At what time do you want to make a reservation?" Le'eize sha'a literally means, "At what time." Let’s break this words and hear them one more time, Le'eize sha'a.
Now let's answer the question! Let's imagine you want to reserve a table at eight o'clock. Leshmone, bevakasha. "At eight o'clock, please." Leshmone means, "At eight." Let’s break this words and hear them one more time, Leshmone. Bevakasha means (as we know by now), "please." Let’s repeat the all phrase one more time, Leshmone, bevakasha.
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“Can I make a reservation for this evening?” (male speaker) - Ani rotse le'hazmin shulkhan le'ha'erev be'va'kasha.
“Can I make a reservation for this evening?” (female speaker) - ani rotsa le'hazmin shulkhan le'ha'erev be'va'kasha.
“For how many people?” - Le'hama anashim?
“For two.” - Shnei anashim.
“At what time do you want to reserve?” - Le'eizo sha'a?
“At eight o'clock, please.” - Li-shmo'ne be'va'kasha.
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

32 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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What time do you usually have dinner?

HebrewPod101.com
Tuesday at 03:55 AM
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Hi Joshua K, Shelley and Hans G,


Thanks for your comments!


@Josh & Shelley - thanks for letting me know. I'm trying to avoid these errors but sometimes the text shifts only after posting the comment... 😒 Anyway, please let me know if any further clarification is needed and I'll be happy to rewrite it 👍


@Hans G - Good work, your phrase is well written. You only have one error - to specify a time in Hebrew, we use "ב" not "ל", so the correct phrase should be: "אנחנו אוכלים בשמונה בערב 😉"


Keep up the good work and enjoy earning Hebrew with us!


Yours,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com



Hans G
Monday at 02:08 AM
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אנחנו אוכלים לשמונה בערב 😉

Joshua K
Wednesday at 10:53 AM
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Hi Roi,


Great thanks for the explanation, that makes sense. ?

-Josh


Shelley, yeah I think software has trouble compensating for two languages that are typed in opposite directions. I've noticed similar things on YouTube comment sections. Thanks. -Josh

Shelley
Wednesday at 05:01 AM
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Dear Roi, I believe your machine reversed the ends of your sentences to Josh. K. It's a mystery how anything gets transmitted electronically. Josh, Hope you figured it out.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 04:30 AM
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Hi Joshua K,


Thanks for commenting!


I'll try to clarify:


The meaning of שתיים is 2 in the feminine form, therefore inflated 'שני בנים (two boys).

The meaning of שניים is 2 in the masculine form' therefore inflated 'שתי בנות' (two girls).


שנייה has two meanings - exactly as the English 'second' - it refers to the period of time, and to someone being second in the feminine form. the masculine of this case would be שני.


I hope that helps :)

Yours,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Joshua K
Sunday at 09:49 AM
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Hello, I've noticed that there are a few different uses of the word "two" in Hebrew, but I'm not really sure what the differences are.

For example:

שתיים (Simply the number 2)

שניים (I know this means "two years" but it seems like I've seen it used as just "two" before, unless I'm mistaken)

שנייה (I'm pretty sure this is used as "second")

שני אנשים (From the example sentence in this lesson) Before this lesson I thought that שני was the masculine form of "second" and שנייה was the feminine form. I thought for "two people" you would say שתיים אנשים So I guess I have a couple things confused somewhere, just wanted to make sure I have it all straight. Thank you!!


-Josh

Hebrewpod101.com Verified
Monday at 07:19 PM
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Hi vincenzo,


Thanks for your comment.


The most common way is to use "I want". Another common option is "Efshar" which means "is it possible" or something similar, can be used as "אפשר בבקשה להזמין" ("Efshar bevakasha lehazmin... (a room/ a table/ etc.)


I hope it's clearer now,


Yours

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

vincenzo
Sunday at 03:25 AM
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the english traslation is "can I" however the hebrew litterally is "I want". My question is: how do you say in hebrew "can I make a reservation?".

Todah raba.

vincenzo

Jay
Thursday at 08:15 AM
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In the lesson, the sentence "Ani rotze le'hazmin shulkahn..." is translated as "Can I make a reservation...", but doesn't this really mean "I want to make a reservation..." or "I would like to make a reservation..."?


Wouldn't the sentence in Hebrew start with "Ani yachol le'hazmin..." (can I make...) or "Efshal le'hazmin" (is it possible to make...)? Could you use either of these if you are trying to find out if there are table available?


It very confusing when trying to learn a new language when the examples are translated to something that doesn't mean exactly what is being said. Someone might think "rotze" means "can".

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 10:58 AM
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Hello Ron,


Thank you for your feedback.

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and find the materials useful for your studies.


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Cheers,

Lena

Team HebrewPod101.com