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๐Ÿ˜„ ๐Ÿ˜ž ๐Ÿ˜ณ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜’ ๐Ÿ˜Ž ๐Ÿ˜  ๐Ÿ˜† ๐Ÿ˜… ๐Ÿ˜œ ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ˜ญ ๐Ÿ˜‡ ๐Ÿ˜ด ๐Ÿ˜ฎ ๐Ÿ˜ˆ โค๏ธ๏ธ ๐Ÿ‘

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Hi HebrewPod101.com Listeners! Welcome to the Pronunciation Series!

What vowels do you find the most difficult to pronounce?

Feel free to ask for help anytime!

HebrewPod101.com
Thursday at 04:26 AM
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Hi Thereasa,


Thanks for posting and for the great feedback!


We're happy to have you with us and hope you'll benefit a lot from our lessons โค๏ธ๏ธโค๏ธ๏ธ


Let us know in case you have any questions - we're here to assist :)


Yours,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Thereasa
Wednesday at 04:18 AM
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๐Ÿ˜„I loved this lesson it made learning vowels much easier. So thankful for hebrewpod!

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 10:08 PM
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Hi emirhan,


I understand your frustration. As someone who specializes in Hebrew and who loves it deeply, I also feel that it is losing a lot of its depth with time; But this is a process that all languages go through. Just imagine a 14-year old English boy trying to read a Shakespearean text. However, you should understand that biblical Hebrew and modern Hebrew are barely the same language (some important Hebrew linguists claim that they are two entirely different languages). We must remember that Hebrew has gone through many metamorphoses due to its speakers' complicated situation throughout the ages.

However, regarding the long or short vowel sounds - this is not the case. The word "Shalom" (ืฉืœื•ื) is pronounced "sha-lom". There is no long "o" sound in Hebrew.

When the written Hebrew was originally founded, it was made up of only consonants, no vowels. Over time, vowels were added to make it easier to read, and the Nikkud was invented only in the 2nd century. Even then, because it was losing its status as a spoken language, there were already differences of opinion regarding the use of the Nikkud because there were already differences in the pronunciation of different words. One of the accents - which is called the 'sephardic' accent - had fewer vowels, and that is the accent of modern Hebrew. This means that there was no deterioration of the language, or sudden drop in richness as you implied, but rather there was an adoption of one of the existing accents which became the main stream.

I hope this has made things a bit clearer, and did not discourage you from learning both modern and ancient Hebrew!


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

emirhan
Sunday at 01:48 AM
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Hmm, so you use ancient writings of the words but read them in a new modern way? I just do not like it when people from new generations change key rules of the language they have inherited from their ancestors, making it hard for people like me to access the ancient language. You would probably know how i feel if you had to learn Arabic, as no matter which type of Arabic it is that you learn, there seems to always be some people you won't be able to communicate well with using the Arabic you have learned, there are just many divergions. I have to learn 2 seperate things in order to both have access to historical Arabic documents AND be able to speak with arabs. And the changes applied to the original language seem to be like exchanging 10 gold coins for 10 copper. I apologise for my aggressive tone in my previous comment, but my view remains same about the modern Hebrew. And it is amazing how you seemingly avoided replying back the same way i talked. The thing about business people, they can do almost whatever it takes to keep a fake smile on their faces.


Interestingly, though seemingly supportive of my perception of Hebrew, the so transliterated Hebrew word "shalom" is supposingly written like "ืฉืœื•ื". There is a waaw there, which is most likely used as a mere prolonging of a sound, at least in ancient Hebrew that is. So are you telling me that, in modern Hebrew, this word is pronounced like sha-lum and not sha-luum?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 03:49 PM
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Hi emirhan,


Thank you for posting.

ืกึปืก is indeed equal to ืกื•ืก in sound, even though it will not be the correct niqqud for this word (it should be ืกื•ึผืก). In Hebrew there are no prolonging letters, as there are no prolonged sounds. It is true that ancient Hebrew had longer and shorter vowel sounds (hence the few different niqqud signs for every vowel sound), but modern Hebrew does not have them anymore; For example, the words ื›ึผึธืœ and ืงื•ึนืœ have different niqqud signs that used to mean short and long vowel sounds (respectively), but in modern Hebrew, these two words sounds exactly the same. As a matter of fact, these days we don't even know how these sounds were pronounced, since the differences have disappeared hundreds of years ago. If by "broken modern version of the language" you mean non-biblical Hebrew than yes, we teach modern Hebrew as it is spoken today; biblical Hebrew is not used anymore (except for liturgical uses, of course), and is not a spoken language. I hope you will enjoy modern Hebrew as well :wink:


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

emirhan
Thursday at 02:05 AM
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Hey! Are you trying to teach wrong? I am in deep doubt that ืกึปืก is equal to ืกื•ืก in sound. And the reason of my doubt is that i think in Hebrew, just as in Arabic, the "ื ื™ ื•" can be used as sound prolonging letters, just as "ุง ูŠ ูˆ" can be used to prolong certain sounds. So the pronunciations i would expect are respectively sus. and suuus. Maybe it is the broken modern version of the language that lets you pronounce them the same way. I still haven't found a scholarly teaching source for Hebrew, or at least i don't think this is one.

hebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 11:27 PM
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Shalom alex,


Thank you do much for posting.

Great having you here!

Please let us know if you have any questions,


Happy Hebrew learning,


Lenny

Team HebrewPod101.com

alex
Saturday at 07:22 PM
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ah ae ee aye oh you???

hebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 10:06 AM
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Shalom Steven Greenberg,


Thank you very much for your comment and feedback.

It is wonderful having you here.

Your opinion is important to us and we will definitely take it into our consideration.


Happy Hebrew learning,


Lenny

Team HebrewPod101.com

Steven Greenberg
Sunday at 03:47 PM
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:disappointed: at least show the vowels. I hope this is not indicative of other lessons. And although these vowels are similar to English vowels, they are spoken differently - that should be illustrated by many examples of native spoken Hebrew with comments on the length and fullness of each vowel.