Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sherah: Hello and welcome to HebrewPod101.com. This is Lower Beginner Series Season 1, Lesson 17 - Not Another Romantic Comedy in Israel! I’m your host, Sherah!
Amir: And I’m Amir.
Sherah: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use three verbs in a sentence.
Amir: The conversation takes place in the kibbutz dining hall in the evening.
Sherah: It’s between Anna and Ofir.
Amir: The speakers are friends so they’ll be using informal Hebrew.
Sherah: Let’s listen to the conversation.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sherah: Going to see a movie in Israel is not a big deal, like it is in other countries where they dub movies into the native language like in Germany and France.
Amir: Right, movies are shown in the original language with subtitles.
Sherah: So you don’t have to know perfect Hebrew to enjoy the movies.
Amir: Unless you want to see a kids movie, then there will be a choice of seeing it in Hebrew or English.
Sherah: Theaters in Israel are usually connected to a shopping mall and are very similar to movie theatres in America.
Amir: We usually have the same kinds of food too, like popcorn and nachos.
Sherah: The one big difference is that they usually have an intermission during the movie.
Amir: Well, that way you don’t have to miss any of the movie to go to the bathroom or get more snacks.
Sherah: That does make it easier.
Amir: Lately there have been big movie houses popping up in Israel.
Sherah: Ah, those are fun. There are usually restaurants there, so you can go out for dinner and a movie all in one place. Let’s move on to the vocabulary for this lesson.
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
herah: Let’s take a closer look at some of the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word we want to talk about is מחר meaning “tomorrow”.
Amir: Right, that’s pretty straightforward. But if you want to talk about the “day after tomorrow” you use a special form of this word.
Sherah: Right, that would be a double noun. Double nouns in Hebrew have a special ‘-ayim’ ending.
Amir: Yes and since the day after tomorrow is technically “two tomorrows”, we use this ending with מחר and it becomes מחרתיים.
Sherah: Listeners, please repeat these two words after Amir.
Amir: מחר {pause} מחרתיים {pause}.
Sherah: The next word that we want to talk about is פעם or “time”.
Amir: This word doesn’t refer to time, like time of the clock.
Sherah: No, it’s more like “one time” or “this time”.
Amir: Speaking of “this time” when you add -ה to the beginning of פעם to make it הפעם it then means “this time”.
Sherah: And if you add the double ending ‘-ayim’ to פעם, it means twice פעמיים. Amir is going to say these three terms and you can repeat after him.
Amir: פעם {pause} הפעם {pause} and פעמיים {pause}
Sherah: Great, let’s move on to the Grammar section.

Lesson focus

Sherah: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use three verbs in a sentence in succession.
Amir: We’ve already covered using two verbs in a sentence in lesson three.
Sherah: Using three verbs in succession isn’t something you will do often, but there are some occasions when you will need to know what to do.
Amir: Like in the dialogue when Ofir asked Anna את רוצה ללכת לראות סרט ביחד? “Do you want to go see a movie together?”
Sherah: As you see in the sample sentence, the first verb is conjugated and the verbs that follow are in the infinitive form.
Amir: Right, this is the general pattern that we use in Hebrew.
Sherah: In English, we would sometimes do it this way and sometimes not. Let’s hear some examples.
Amir: The first example is הבן שלי אוהב ללכת לרוץ איתי
Sherah: “My son loves to go running with me.” In this example, the English is a little different. Here, the first verb we used is אוהב (‘ohev’), meaning “loves” and it is conjugated in the masculine singular form in the present tense.
Amir: The two verbs that follow are ללכת (‘lalekhet’) “to go” and לרוץ (‘larutz’) “to run” and both of these are in the infinitive form. The next example is אני רוצה ללמוד לנגן בפסנתר.
Sherah: “I want to learn to play the piano.” Here the English is the same.
Amir: In this example, the first verb we used is רוצה (rotzeh), meaning “wants” and it is conjugated in the masculine singular form in the present tense.
Sherah: The two verbs that follow are ללמוד (‘lilmod’) “to study” and לנגן (‘lenagen’) “to play”, “to play (an instrument)” actually and both of these are in the infinitive form.
Amir: The last example is - אנחנו צריכים ללכת לשמוע את הקונצרט שלך. “We need to come listen to your concert.”
Sherah: In this last example, the first verb we used is צריכים (‘tz’rikhim’), meaning “need” and it is conjugated in the masculine plural form in the present tense.
Amir: Again, the two verbs that follow are ללכת (‘lalekhet’) “to go” and לשמוע (‘lishmo’a’) “to listen” and both of these are in the infinitive form.
Sherah: That’s all there is to it. It’s quite simple. Because we still have some time in this lesson, we want to talk about conjugating the verb לרצות in Hebrew, which means “to want”.
Amir: לרצות is an irregular verb in Hebrew because it has a weak letter in the root, so it’s conjugated a little differently.
Sherah: Right, as we’ve talked about before, when verbs have weak letters in their roots, those letters sometimes change to other letters or even drop off completely.
Amir: That’s what happens with לרצות. You don’t even see the third letter of the root in the infinitive. The root is ‘resh - tzadik - yud’. Sometimes ‘heh’ is considered the third letter because it’s used so often instead of ‘yud’.
Sherah: In the present tense, the ‘yud’ is replaced by ‘heh’ for the singular conjugations and dropped in the plural conjugations. Here are example sentences with each of the four conjugations of לרצות
Amir: First is the masculine singular - אני רוצה עוגה.
Sherah: The verb is רוצה and the ‘heh’ carries an ‘e’ vowel to show that it’s masculine. Next is feminine singular.
Amir: היא רוצה שמלה.
Sherah: “She wants a dress.” The verb there was רוצה and there the ‘heh’ carries and ‘ah’ vowel to show that it’s feminine. Next is the masculine plural.
Amir: הם רוצים אמבטיה. “They want a bath.”
Sherah: The verb there was רוצים and the third root letter was dropped completely and then the ים- ending was added. The same happens with feminine plural, only the ‘-ot’ ending is added instead of ‘-im’.
Amir: הן רוצות לחם.
Sherah: “They want some bread.”

Outro

Well, that’s it for this lesson.
Amir: Now that you’ve listened to this lesson, please visit HebrewPod101.com and tell us what you want.
Sherah: Make sure you check the lesson notes, and we’ll see you next time.
Amir: Thanks everyone, להתראות
Sherah: Bye!

16 Comments

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HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners!

Which movie would you like to watch with subtitles in Hebrew?

HebrewPod101.com
Saturday at 12:57 AM
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Hi קמילה,


Thanks for posting!


Yes, "ואלס עם באשיר" isn't the easiest film... there are many nice Israeli comedies actually, a few very loved classics you can try are "מבצע סבתא", "גבעת חלפון אינה עונה and "תעלת בלאומילך".

Additionally, there are "סיפור גדול" and "מלחמת תשעים הדקות" that I more recent and I can personally recommend 😄


Note the missing preposition on your phrase - should be "על איזו קומדיה אתם ממליצים".


Enjoy!

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

קמילה
Sunday at 05:04 AM
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חבל, לא ראיתי הרבה סרטים מישראל... פעם ראיתי סרט בשם “ולץ עם בשיר“, הוא היה מעניין מאוד אבל גם ממש עצוב, בסוף שלו הרגשתי על הפנים. אולי אני צריכה לראות רק קומדיות. איזו קומדיה אתם ממליצים? 😉

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:50 PM
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Hi Rick,


We’re glad to be of help :smile:


Sincerely,

Team HebrewPod101.com

Rick
Saturday at 05:54 AM
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Thanks so much, Jae!

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 01:40 PM
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Hi Rick,


We're sorry for the inconvenience. We've just fixed the issue with the transcription. Please check it again.


Thank you for your patience,

Jae

Team HebrewPod101.com

Rick
Tuesday at 04:51 AM
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Hi Lenny! I noticed that the PDF lesson transcript for this lesson appears to have been mixed up - it has the correct cover page but the transcript for a previous lesson??

shelley Lynn
Sunday at 08:56 PM
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Thank you, Lenny, most helpful.

hebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 10:17 AM
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Shalom Shelley Lynn,


Thank you for your comment.

I"m glad to be able to help.

...חוץ מ in Hebrew means "besides" where as אלא means "but" in the sense of:

זה לא שחור אלא כחול כהה ( it is not black BUT dark blue)

זה לא היום אלא מחר ( it is not today BUT tomorrow)

etc...

When you like to exclude something in Hebrew you should use ...חוץ מ.


Happy Hebrew learning,


Lenny

Team HebrewPod101.com

shelley Lynn
Saturday at 12:05 AM
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Thank you, Lenny, for all your excellent comments. I can see that the verb you used tsofim is specific to watching films and being a spectator as opposed to using the verb habeet that I used which means to look at. I used a conjunction that means except at the end of the sentence and you used a conjunction that means besides. Would you clarify why that is preferable?

hebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 03:35 PM
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Shalom shelley Lynn,


Thank you for your comment.

Movies = masculine noun in Hebrew. סרט (singular) סרטים (plural)

besides = ...חוץ מ


We love to see many movies in the evening. Mostly we watch films on comedy. but we love almost everything except violence. =

אנחנו אוהבים לראות הרבה סרטים בערב . לרוב אנחנו צופים בקומדיות אבל אנחנו אוהבים כמעט הכול חוץ מסרטים עם אלימות


Happy Hebrew learning,


Lenny

Team HebrewPod101.com