Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sherah: Hi everyone, and welcome back to HebrewPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 8 - Talking About Your Childhood in Hebrew. Sherah here.
Amir: שלום I'm Amir.
Sherah: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the verb "to be" as a helping or auxiliary verb to discuss the past. The conversation takes place at Ella's apartment.
Amir: It's between Ella and Daniel.
Sherah: The speakers are friends, so they will use informal Hebrew. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

דניאל: יש לכן עוד סיפורים מהילדות של אלה?
גברת אלון: אלה, תספרי לו על החברים הדמיוניים שלך.
אלה: טוב, לא הספיק לי לשחק עם חבר דמיוני אחד, אז שיחקתי עם שמונה.
דניאל: שמונה? למה כל כך הרבה? היה לך משעמם בבית?
גברת אלון: היה לה חבר דמיוני לכל מצב רוח אפשרי. ולכולם היה שם.
אלה: כן, וכולם היו באים איתנו לכל מקום, עד שאימא שכחה אחד בחנות. הייתי כל כך עצובה, שבכיתי כל הדרך הביתה.
דניאל: חזרתם כדי לקחת אותו?
אלה: לא, אימא אמרה לי שהוא גדול ולכן הוא יכול לקחת אוטובוס.
דניאל: והתשובה הזאת סיפקה אותך?
אלה: כן, ולפיכך החלטתי שגם אני גדולה מספיק כדי לקחת אוטובוס ולמצוא אותו.
דניאל: ועשית את זה?
אלה: ניסיתי. השכנה שלנו ראתה אותי והחזירה אותי הביתה. אין לי מושג איך הייתי עולה על האוטובוס, כי לא היה לי כסף.
Sherah: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Daniel: Do you have any more stories from Ella's childhood?
Mrs. Alon: Ella, tell him about your imaginary friends.
Ella: Well, it wasn't enough for me to play with one imaginary friend, so I played with eight.
Daniel: Eight? Why so many? Was it boring at home?
Mrs. Alon: She had an imaginary friend for every possible mood. And they all had names.
Ella: Yes, and they would all come with us everywhere, until mom forgot one in a store. I was so sad, I cried all the way home.
Daniel: Did you return to get him?
Ella: No, Mom told me he was big and therefore he can take a bus.
Daniel: And that answer satisfied you?
Ella: Yes, and so I decided that I was big enough to take a bus and find him.
Daniel: And did you do that?
Ella: I tried. Our neighbor saw me and took me back home. I have no idea how I would have gotten on the bus because I didn't have money.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sherah: Amir, are there preschool kindergartens in Israel?
Amir: Of course.
Sherah: Can you tell us more about them?
Amir: Sure. Israeli preschool kindergartens usually have between 20 to 35 children. The classroom is usually one large room, which is divided into topic areas like a library, an arts-and-crafts area, a building-block area, a "kitchen" area, and so on. Every kindergarten also has a yard with some playground facilities, and many have small junk-yards with old kitchenware, and broken electrical appliances.
Sherah: What is the educational program in these kinds of kindergartens?
Amir: The educational program in preschool includes many different topics, like family, nature, Israeli holidays, food, and many more. The parents always get weekly updates of the topics learned, so that they too can be involved in the educational program. Most kindergartens have active and involved parents committees.
Sherah: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Sherah: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Amir: ילדות [natural native speed]
Sherah: childhood
Amir: ילדות[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: ילדות [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: דמיוני [natural native speed]
Sherah: imaginary
Amir: דמיוני[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: דמיוני [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: מצב רוח [natural native speed]
Sherah: mood
Amir: מצב רוח[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: מצב רוח [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: לשכוח [natural native speed]
Sherah: to forget
Amir: לשכוח[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: לשכוח [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: לבכות [natural native speed]
Sherah: to cry
Amir: לבכות[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: לבכות [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: כל הדרך [natural native speed]
Sherah: all the way
Amir: כל הדרך[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: כל הדרך [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: לכן [natural native speed]
Sherah: so, therefore
Amir: לכן[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: לכן [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: לספק [natural native speed]
Sherah: to satisfy
Amir: לספק[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: לספק [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: לפיכך [natural native speed]
Sherah: for this reason
Amir: לפיכך[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: לפיכך [natural native speed]
Sherah: And last..
Amir: להחזיר [natural native speed]
Sherah: to return
Amir: להחזיר[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: להחזיר [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Sherah: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Amir: מצב רוח
Sherah: which means “mood”
Amir: מצב רוח consists of two words: מצב, meaning “state” or “situation”, and רוח (ruaħ), meaning “wind” or “spirit”.
Sherah: So, it literally means “state of spirit”.
Amir: The phrase מצב רוח (matzav ruaħ) is used pretty much in the same way as the word “mood” in English.
Sherah: And like the word “mood”, matzav ruaħ can also be made into an adjective מצוברח (metzuvraħ), meaning “moody” - in bad mood. Amir, can you give us an example using this word?
Amir: Sure. For example, you can say.. היא הגיעה היום לעבודה במצב רוח נהדר.
Sherah: ..which means “She arrived to work today in a great mood.” Okay, what's the next word?
Amir: לספק
Sherah: which means “to satisfy” or “to fulfill”, but it also means “to provide” or “to supply”.
Amir: The root letters of this verb are Samekh Peh Kuf: ס.פ.ק, and the verb stem is Pi'el.
Sherah: You can also create a noun from this verb.
Amir: Right. לספק is a verb, “to satisfy” and סיפוק (sipuk) means “satisfaction”.
Sherah: Can you give us an example using this word?
Amir: For example.. עבודה חקלאית היא קשה מאוד, אבל גם מספקת.
Sherah: .. which means “Agricultural work is very hard, but also satisfying.” Okay, what's the last word?
Amir: דמיוני
Sherah: ...which means “imaginary”
Amir: The adjective דמיוני (dimyoni) comes from the noun דמיון (dimyon) - “imagination”.
Sherah: Like many other Hebrew adjectives, it consists of a noun plus the sound “i” at the end, represented by the letter י (Yod).
Amir: You can use the word דמיוני (dimyoni) to describe things that are not real, that are made-up by imagination. It can be a place, a person, an object and so on.
Sherah: Can you give us an example using this word?
Amir: Sure. For example, you can say.. אני לא מאמין לו, זה נשמע כמו סיפור דמיוני.
Sherah: .. which means “I don't believe him, it sounds like an imaginary story.” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Sherah: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the verb “to be” as a helping or auxiliary verb to discuss the past. The verb “to be” in Hebrew is irregular like it is in other languages. Ok, Amir, let’s conjugate it in the past tense. “I was” will be...
Amir: הייתי
Sherah: you, singular, masculine
Amir: היית
Sherah: you, singular, feminine
Amir: היית
Sherah: he
Amir: היה
Sherah: she
Amir: הייתה
Sherah: we
Amir: היינו
Sherah: you, plural, masculine
Amir: הייתם
Sherah: you, plural, feminine
Amir: הייתן
Sherah: They
Amir: היו
Sherah: Verbs in the past tense in Hebrew are set up so that you don't always need to use the subject: it can be understood from the verb itself.
Amir: So, when the action is done by the speaker or by the listener - that is, first or second person - you can omit the subject. For example, איפה היית אתמול?
Sherah: This means “Where were you yesterday?”
Amir: The sentence includes three words: איפה (efo), “where”; היית (hayita), “were”; and אתמול (etmol), “yesterday”.
Sherah: Since the word for “were” is already conjugated to include “you”, single masculine, the word for “you” - אתה (ata) - is omitted.
Amir: The same applies for “to be” in past tense , first person. For example..אתמול הייתי בים.
Sherah: “Yesterday I was at the beach.” In this sentence we omitted the word for “I” - אני (ani), as the word for “was” is already conjugated to include “I”.
Amir: So, if you want to stress the subject you can use it, but it's not necessary.
Sherah: Ok, I think that’s clear. Our next grammar point is the verb “to be” plus adjective. In our dialog we have a sentence...
Amir: הייתי כל כך עצובה, שבכיתי כל הדרך הביתה.
Sherah: which means “I was so sad, I cried all the way home.” As you can see, Ella is not using the word אני (ani), “I”. The word “was” implies it.
Amir: We can also see Ella using a structure of “to be” + adjective - הייתי עצובה (hayiti atzuva), “I was sad”.
Sherah: Hebrew adjectives have to agree with their subject in gender and number, but they don’t change according to tense or person.
Amir: So the adjective עצובה (atzuva) meaning “sad” which is singular feminine, will stay the same whenever Ella is saying it about herself - in past, present or future tense.
Sherah: This also goes for objects. If you want to say that the food was delicious, you will use the adjective טעים (ta’im).
Amir: You can use the object in your sentence, for example, salad, or simply refer to it as זה (ze), “that”, masculine. זה היה טעים מאוד
Sherah: “That was very delicious.” Amir, can you give us more examples?
Amir: Sure. היא הייתה רגועה.
Sherah: “She was calm.” This sentence is using the structure “to be” + adjective, to talk about a female in the third person.
Amir: הם היו נחמדים אליי.
Sherah: “They were nice to me.” This sentence is using the structure “to be” + adjective, to talk about a third person-plural subject - “they”. Listeners, as always, please check the lesson notes for more examples and explanation.

Outro

Sherah: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Amir: להתראות

33 Comments

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HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Let us know if you have any questions.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 08:50 PM
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Hi Jack feder,


Thank you for your comment!


The formulation of "היה לו משעמם" might seem a little awkward for English speakers, but this is actually the most common way to say this in Hebrew. Another common way is to use the verb "להשתעמם" (to be/ get bored), in the "hitpa'el" form that is considered passive and active simultaneously. Using this verb in the past tense, we could say "הוא השתעמם בבית", which would be a good translation as well.

This subject is a little complicated, so have no worries if it is not yet 100% clear :)


In any case, please feel free to contact us if you have any further questions!


Best,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Jack feder
Thursday at 12:00 AM
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In this lesson we see the phrase היה לך משעמם translated as were you bored at home. Shouldn’t that be היה משועמם בבית. This passive form seems more correct. Even simpler היה משעמם בבית

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:17 PM
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Hi Yitzchak,


Thanks for posting your question. 😄


There are two reasons for the usage of "היו" here. First, it implies better that this is a hypothetical situation. Writing "וכולם באו איתנו" gives the sentence a more "true" feeling.

Second, using "הייתי + פועל" (for example: "הייתי הולך") is a good way of describing routine, habitual actions. Writing "הם באו איתנו לכל מקום" would be read as if these "friends" really went everywhere with the family, while "היו באים איתנו" sounds less committing...


So, you could say either "כתבתי מכתבים" (translates as "I wrote letters") or "הייתי כותב מכתבים" (translates as "I used to write letters" - or something similar)


Does it make sense? Please let us know in case further clarification is needed here 👍


Yours,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Yitzchak
Wednesday at 09:48 AM
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She says in the dialogue 'היו באים איתנו'. what's the difference between that and 'הם באו איתנו'? Is it that the former means "they would come with us", while the latter means "they came with us"?

Are there instances where it would be appropriate to add a first-person or second-person subject while describing the past? For example, for some reason I thought that if I wanted to say "I was writing" (as opposed to "I wrote") I would say אני היה כותב (as opposed to כתבתי).

HebrewPod101.com
Sunday at 07:44 PM
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Hi Edward,


Thank you for posting.


You can also try downloading the audio file and listening to it with an audio player on your device.


If you experience any other technical issues, please send us an email at contactus@HebrewPod101.com


Thank you for using HebrewPod101.com!


We hope you’re enjoying our lessons!


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team HebrewPod101.com

Edward Av Assisi
Tuesday at 09:35 PM
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Hello,

I have troubles playing the audio files (on Safari). I refreshed this page and tried to log in on Chrome but still the same problem.

I scrolled forward a few lessons - the same issue!


Any help?

Thanks.

Jeannet Benschop
Thursday at 06:24 AM
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Thanks Roi! At least the rules are clear now :)

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 02:40 AM
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Hi Jeannet,


Thanks for posting.


Nowadays many people are misusing these rules correctly, and I'm sure that if you would listen carefully you would be able to find error like these at almost every Hebrew speaker... The recording on the website are also presenting this mixup in their incontestability, unfortunately, but this count as an 'acceptable' mistake mostly.


Yours,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Jeannet Benschop
Wednesday at 12:18 AM
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Thank you Roi, but the way I understand it is that 'lekol' should be pronounced as 'lekhol', because the lamed precedes the kaf. I also thought I had heard 'lekhol' in other cases, but not sure though.


>>Thanks for commenting and for mentioning these issues to us.


The word "all (kulam) is pronounced in various ways, as you mentions. the 'correct' is indeed kuLAM, but the pronounciation as KUlam is often heard even by native speakers.


The changing of כ from k to kh accurs in many words due to its position. when כ appears first in a word, it'll always be pronounced K, same with ב - it'll always be B and never V.


More information can be found here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagesh


Happy to help!

Yours,

Roi


Jeannet Benschop

THURSDAY AT 5:45 PM

6 כן, וכולם היו באים איתנו לכל מקום

I am confused about the sounds. For example in this sentence it is 'lekol' while in other cases the kaf changes to the kh sound if

there is a consonant preceding the kaf. But here it remains the hard k.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:39 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Jeannet,


Thanks for commenting and for mentioning these issues to us.


The word "all (kulam) is pronounced in various ways, as you mentions. the 'correct' is indeed kuLAM, but the pronounciation as KUlam is often heard even by native speakers.


The changing of כ from k to kh accurs in many words due to its position. when כ appears first in a word, it'll always be pronounced K, same with ב - it'll always be B and never V.


More information can be found here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagesh


Happy to help!

Yours,

Roi