Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Sherah: Hi everyone, and welcome back to HebrewPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 7 - It Takes a Long Time to Fly to Israel! Sherah here.
Amir: שלום I'm Amir.
Sherah: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use Hitpa'el verbs. The conversation takes place at the train station.
Amir: It's between Daniel and Mrs. Alon.
Sherah: The speakers are acquaintances, so they will use informal Hebrew. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

דניאל: ברוכה הבאה, גברת אלון. התאוששת מהטיסה שלך?
גברת אלון: לא לגמרי. הטיסה הייתה די ארוכה.
דניאל: כן, זה שתים-עשרה שעות, נכון? אני לא יודע איך את מתמודדת עם שעות מטורפות כאלה.
גברת אלון: אני כבר לא צעירה, אבל אני עדיין לא מתה, דניאל.
דניאל: סליחה, לא התכוונתי שזה יישמע ככה.
גברת אלון: דניאל, אני צוחקת איתך! אתה חייב ללמוד להתמודד עם חוש ההומור שלי.
דניאל: אהה... גברת אלון. אני צריך להכיר אותך יותר, כנראה.
גברת אלון: תגיד לי את האמת, דניאל, איך אלה מסתדרת עם הלימודים שלה?
דניאל: אני לא יכול לשקר לך. קשה לה, אבל היא מתמודדת.
גברת אלון: נראה לי שהיא צריכה להתעודד. זאת הסיבה שבאתי.
דניאל: זאת תהיה הפתעה נחמדה בשבילה.
גברת אלון: אני מקווה.
Sherah: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Daniel: Welcome, Mrs. Alon. Have you recovered from your flight?
Mrs. Alon: Not entirely. The flight was pretty long.
Daniel: Yes, it's twelve hours, right? I don't know how you deal with those crazy hours.
Mrs. Alon: I'm not young anymore, but I'm not dead yet, Daniel.
Daniel: Sorry, I didn't mean for it to sound that way.
Mrs. Alon: Daniel, I'm joking with you! You have to learn to deal with my sense of humor.
Daniel: Ah... Mrs. Alon. I should get to know you better, apparently.
Mrs. Alon: Tell me the truth, Daniel, how is Ella managing with her studies?
Daniel: I can't lie to you. It's hard for her, but she's managing.
Mrs. Alon: It seems to me she needs to be encouraged. That's why I came.
Daniel: It will be a nice surprise for her.
Mrs. Alon: I hope so.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Sherah: According to the World Health Organization, the life expectancy in Israel for men is 80, and for women - 84.
Amir: Israeli citizens who reach retirement age, from 60 to 67, are entitled to receive an old-age pension.
Sherah: Senior citizens also get a certificate that offers a variety of benefits on public transportation, parks, concerts, plays, and other services.
Amir: Every city in Israel has senior citizens clubs that offer a range of activities and events such as drama clubs, folk dancing, exercise, arts and crafts, and so on.
Sherah: Many Israeli universities and other educational institutes also have educational opportunities for senior citizens in fields like art, music, history, literature, philosophy and many more. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Sherah: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Amir: להתאושש [natural native speed]
Sherah: to recover
Amir: להתאושש[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: להתאושש [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: די [natural native speed]
Sherah: pretty
Amir: די[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: די [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: מטורף [natural native speed]
Sherah: crazy
Amir: מטורף[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: מטורף [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: להתמודד [natural native speed]
Sherah: to deal
Amir: להתמודד[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: להתמודד [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: להתכוון [natural native speed]
Sherah: to mean
Amir: להתכוון[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: להתכוון [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: להישמע [natural native speed]
Sherah: to be heard
Amir: להישמע[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: להישמע [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: לשקר [natural native speed]
Sherah: to lie
Amir: לשקר[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: לשקר [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: להתעודד [natural native speed]
Sherah: to be encouraged
Amir: להתעודד[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: להתעודד [natural native speed]
Sherah: Next we have..
Amir: סיבה [natural native speed]
Sherah: reason
Amir: סיבה[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: סיבה [natural native speed]
Sherah: And last..
Amir: לצחוק [natural native speed]
Sherah: to laugh, to joke
Amir: לצחוק[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Amir: לצחוק [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Sherah: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Amir: די
Sherah: which means “pretty” in the sense of “quite”, or “fairly”. In today's Hebrew, this adverb is not as strong as the adverb “quite” - it's more like “pretty” or even “kind-of”.
Amir: Right. Saying about someone הוא די חכם (hu dei ħakham), “He's pretty smart”, is not as strong as saying הוא חכם (hu ħakham) - “He's smart”.
Sherah: די (dei) is considered rather informal.
Amir: A more formal word would be למדי (le'madai) - it has the exact same meaning, but it comes after the adjective and not before.
Sherah: Can you give us an example using this word?
Amir: Sure. For example, you can say.. אני יכול לעזור לך, אני די טוב בזה.
Sherah: ..which means “I can help you, I'm pretty good at it.” Okay, what's the next word?
Amir: לשקר
Sherah: which means “to lie”
Amir: לשקר is derived from the noun שקר (sheker), meaning “lie”.
Sherah: The verb לשקר (le'shaker) consists of the same root letters - Shin Kuf Resh: ש.ק.ר, put into the verb stem Pi'el.
Amir: לשקר (le'shaker) is the infinitive form of the verb. If you want to find it in a dictionary, you will find it in the singular-masculine-third person-past form: שיקר (shiker).
Sherah: Similar to English, you don't have to use this verb to talk about lying - you can say לספר שקר (le'saper sheker), “to tell a lie”. Amir, can you give us an example using this word?
Amir: Sure. For example, you can say.. אל תשקר לי.
Sherah: .. which means “Don't lie to me.” Okay, what's the next word?
Amir: מטורף
Sherah: which means “crazy” or “insane”.
Amir: It comes from the noun טירוף (teruf), meaning “insanity”.
Sherah: Similar to English, this word is used mostly as a slang expression. You can use it to say that something is impractical, like in “a crazy plan”..
Amir: תכנית מטורפת (tokhnit metorefet),
Sherah: or extraordinary, like in “it was a crazy party”
Amir: זאת הייתה מסיבה מטורפת (zot haita mesiba metorefet). Listeners, we don't use this word to describe people with an actual mental illnesses.
Sherah: Another usage of this adjective is also equivalent to the English expression “crazy about”. For example… “Crazy about chocolate”
Amir: מטורף על שוקולד.
Sherah: Can you give us an example using this word?
Amir: Sure. For example, you can say.. אתה רוצה ללכת ברגל מתל אביב לחיפה? זה מטורף!
Sherah: .. which means “You want to walk from Tel Aviv to Haifa by foot? That's crazy!” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Sherah: In this lesson, you’ll learn about Hitpa'el verbs.
Amir: Hitpa’el is one of the seven Hebrew verb stems, into which the verbs’ root letters are put to create Hebrew verbs. Sherah, let’s remind our listeners of these seven Hebrew stems.
Sherah: Sure. Three of the verb stems are used for active actions, like “to dress”, “to leave”; and three of them are used for passive actions, like “to be dressed”, “to be left” and the last one - Hitpa’el - is used for active-intransitive verbs, action verbs with no direct object, like “arrive”, “sneeze”, “shower” etc.
Amir: Those are mostly reflexive verbs - verbs in which the subject both acts and is acted upon by the verb.
Sherah: Conjugating Hitpa’el verbs has a very clear pattern into which we put the root letters.
Amir: In the past tense, all conjugations will start with the sound heet: -הִת. After that, the root letters will come, and after them the ending, which will be the same as in any other Hebrew stem.
Sherah: The vowel rhyming pattern will always be ee-ah-ah-, except for “him”. For “him” it will be ee-ah-eh. Ok, Let's give some example and conjugate it in past tense...Let's take the verb להתקבל (le’hitkabel), “to get accepted”. The root letters are ק.ב.ל. So… “I got accepted” will be...
Amir: התקבלתי
Sherah: we...
Amir: התקבלנו
Sherah: you, singular, masculine
Amir: התקבלת
Sherah: you, singular, feminine
Amir: התקבלת
Sherah: you, plural, masculine
Amir: התקבלתם
Sherah: you, plural, feminine
Amir: התקבלתן
Sherah: he
Amir: התקבל
Sherah: she
Amir: התקבלה
Sherah: They, plural, masculine
Amir: התקבלו
Sherah: They, plural, feminine
Amir: התקבלו In the present tense, all conjugations will start with the sound “meet”: -מִת, followed by the root letters.
Sherah: The vowel rhyming pattern is ee-ah-eh-, except for the plurals, which is ee-ah-. Amir, let’s take the same verb להתקבל (le’hitkabel), meaning “to get accepted” and conjugate it in present tense. So, I, masculine..
Amir: מתקבל
Sherah: I, feminine
Amir: מתקבלת
Sherah: we, masculine
Amir: מתקבלים
Sherah: we, feminine
Amir: מתקבלות
Sherah: you, singular, masculine
Amir: מתקבל
Sherah: you, singular, feminine
Amir: מתקבלת
Sherah: you, plural, masculine
Amir: מתקבלים
Sherah: you, plural, feminine
Amir: מתקבלות
Sherah: he
Amir: מתקבל
Sherah: she
Amir: מתקבלת
Sherah: They, plural, masculine
Amir: מתקבלים
Sherah: They, plural, feminine
Amir: מתקבלות
Sherah: In the future tenses it’s a bit more complex. But if you are familiar with any other verb stem, it’ll be easier.
Amir: In the future tense, all conjugations of all verb stems start with the same letters. For example, “you” plural will always begin with ת [t]
Sherah: So, let’s conjugate our verb in the future tense. “I”...
Amir: אתקבל
Sherah: we...
Amir: נתקבל
Sherah: you, singular, masculine
Amir: תתקבל
Sherah: you, singular, feminine
Amir: תתקבלי
Sherah: you, plural, masculine
Amir: תתקבלו
Sherah: you, plural, feminine
Amir: תתקבלו
Sherah: he
Amir: יתקבל
Sherah: she
Amir: תתקבל
Sherah: They, plural, masculine
Amir: יתקבלו
Sherah: They, plural, feminine
Amir: יתקבלו
Sherah: Listeners, of course, there are a few exceptions, so please check the lesson notes.
Amir: Another important exception is Hitpa’el with double last letters.
Sherah: We see a lot of these in the dialog. For example..
Amir: התאושש
Sherah: “recovered”
Amir: התמודד
Sherah: “handled”
Amir: In the case of roots with double last letters, like מ.ד.ד, the pattern changes: an additional “oh” sound represented by the letter ו - vav is added after the first root letter, in all conjugations.
Sherah: In the case of roots with the letter ו (vav) in the middle of them, like ע.ו.ד, the last letter is doubled and creates the same pattern as that of a doubled-last-letters root. Listeners, please check the lesson notes for conjugation of Hitpa’el with double last letters.

Outro

Sherah: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Amir: להתראות

16 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Let us know if you have any questions.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Friday at 07:30 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Dear מלאני,


Thanks for commenting and for the kind words ❤️️ We appreciate your feedback 😄


I think adding prepositions to vocabulary verbs is an excellent idea - I know it was helpful for me as well while studying new languages - but I'm not sure about how possible it would be on our website due to technical issues... I will forward this suggestion, however, and we will see if this issue can be approached in the future.


Keep up the good work, and enjoy learning Hebrew 😇


Sincerely,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

מלאני
Thursday at 05:00 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

היי 👣

אני עדיין אוהבת ללמוד בדרך שיעורים שלכם. תודה רבה על העבודה הטובה שלכם!


חשבתי כמה פעמים על משהו שחשוב לי ושגם להקל לי ללמוד מילים חדשות. למה לא להציג את הפועלים החדשים עם מילת היחס?


למשל ”לשקר ל...” ולא רק ”לשקר”.


אני כן שמתי לב שאתם משתמשים במילת היחס במשפט לדוגמה לעתים קרובות. אבל למרת זאת אני מעדיפה ללמוד את הפועל גם ברשימה עם מילת היחס ששייכת לו.


מה אתם חושבים על כל זה?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 07:31 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Rory,


Thanks for posting your question!


Quoting from Wikipedia - sibilants are "fricative consonants of higher amplitude and pitch, made by directing a stream of air with the tongue towards the teeth."

In English, these include the sounds: z, s, zh, sh.


The Hebrew fricative consonants are the letters: ז, ש, ש, ס, צ


You can read about this more here - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sibilant


I hope that helps :)


Sincerely,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Rory
Saturday at 09:05 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

What is a sibilant consonant? can you explain it?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 05:26 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Jeannet Benschop,


Thanks for commenting.


It's working on my end, so the problem is probably already fixed.


Yours,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Jeannet Benschop
Monday at 06:16 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

The audio of the 4th line of the dialogue is not working:


B: אני כבר לא צעירה, אבל אני עדיין לא מתה, דניאל.

Shelley Goldenberg
Tuesday at 03:39 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Yes, of course. Thank you.

Hebrewpod101.com Verified
Monday at 11:09 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Shelley,


Yes, reflexive verbs aren't necessarily in Hitpa'el form, several some other structures can be used as well (ie with Pi'el: אני מפיל את עצמי על הרצפה" - I let myself fall down on the floor).


Other common Hitpael verbs:

להשתגע (to go crazy) I'm going crazy = אני משתגע

להתעצבן (to get angry) אני מתעצבן

להתעודד (to cheer (yourself) up) אני מתעודד

להתהלך (to walk around) אני מתהלך


Hope it helps,

Yours,

Roi

Team Hebrewpod101.com

Shelley Goldenberg
Sunday at 07:14 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Thank you, Roi. I was avoiding this lesson as it seemed so hard at first reading. so I did other things and then came back for a second try. So glad my translations were good. I think I used some reflexive verbs but only in the infinitive form. So are all reflexive verbs actions done by the subject on themselves or person on whom you are speaking about on theirself? It is difficult to grasp. Could you provide some other examples, please? ok I just skimmed the lesson once again. From the notes, I see that the hitpa'el verbs have three sections, one being the reflexive. Does another verb group have reflexive verbs?

Hebrewpod101.com Verified
Saturday at 09:17 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Shelley, Ann and Ollie,


Sorry for the delay.


@Shelly - Good work! your translations are very good :)


In order to use the reflexive "להתעודד", we can phrase this sentence - "בואו נלך אליו כדי לעזור לו להתעודד" The person is performing the action on himself.


@Ann - very well! a small note - on your last translation, הוא עדיין לא התאושש מתאונת הדרכים - car-accident = תאונת-דרכים, "the" car accident = תאונת הדרכים.


Ollie - A few notes and corrections -

1. Small typo - - documentary = תיעודי.

2. אחרי האירוע המצחיק שלנו, לא הצלחנו להפסיק לצחוק ממנו - one laughs "from" something.

3. ?תני לי לעזור לך עם המזוודה הכבדה שלך. כמה רחוקה המכונית שלך

4. OK.


לארע isn't really a word, לקרות is the parallel of the English "to happen", "אירע" can be used to describe a past event and is considered a higher language. Them common use of this root is אירוע = event.


Yours,

Roi

Team Hebrewpod101.com