Dialogue

Vocabulary

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๐Ÿ˜„ ๐Ÿ˜ž ๐Ÿ˜ณ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜’ ๐Ÿ˜Ž ๐Ÿ˜  ๐Ÿ˜† ๐Ÿ˜… ๐Ÿ˜œ ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ˜ญ ๐Ÿ˜‡ ๐Ÿ˜ด ๐Ÿ˜ฎ ๐Ÿ˜ˆ โค๏ธ๏ธ ๐Ÿ‘

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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Did you get it right?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 10:08 PM
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Hi Yitzchak,


Thanks for posting your question!


The word "ืžื–ืžืŸ" is best translated as "long ago" (would be used to describe events that happened years, decades and centuries ago). "ืœื ืžื–ืžืŸ" is the opposite. It can be translated as "not so long ago".


I hope that helps :)


Yours,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Yitzchak
Thursday at 04:14 AM
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Thank you.


Another question: doesn't 'ืžื–ืžืŸ' mean "a while ago"? And if so, why do they translate 'ืœื ืžื–ืžืŸ' as "a while ago? Shouldn't it be "not a while ago"?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:53 PM
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Hi Yitzchak,


Thanks for posting!


You are correct, lunch is "ืืจื•ื—ืช ืฆื”ืจื™ื™ื". However, when we already ask here "where did she eat..." it is already clear from the context that by saying "ืฆื”ืจื™ื™ื" the speaker means "lunch".

Strangely, this is possible while talking about lunch, but never when talking about dinner or breakfast. I don't know the reason for that ๐Ÿ˜…


I hope that helps :)


Best,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Yitzchak
Tuesday at 10:07 AM
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I thought lunch was ืืจื•ื—ืช ืฆื”ืจื™ื™ื. Is ืฆื”ืจื™ื™ื just a shorter and more common way of referring to lunch? Does the same apply to the other meals as well? Like, would one say ื‘ื•ืงืจ or ืขืจื‘?


ืชื•ื“ื”

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 08:51 PM
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Hi Matt,


Thanks for posting! Small variations in pronunciation are common in Hebrew, and they are usually accepted and understood as long as the intention of the speaker is still clear.

In this case, we see that the word is written with nikkud as ืฆึธืขึดื™ืฃ (tsa'if), so this would be the correct version.


The alteration of "tsa'if" into "tse'if" is probably caused by the "difficulty" of the diphthong "A+I", and is smoothened by the "E" vowel. While this isn't "correct" according to the Hebrew rules, such alterations happen when talking in a high speed and as the language develops, some of them even fixate as they were the "better" variants for some reason...


I hope that explanation helps ๐Ÿ˜„


Sincerely,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Matt
Tuesday at 02:31 AM
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The woman pronounces the word for scarf "tseif", but the man pronounces it "tsaif". Is there any significance to this difference? Is one of them mispronouncing the word, or are both correct?

Hebrewpod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:06 AM
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Hi Jeannet Benschop,


Thanks for commenting and for your corrections.


Both tsohoraim and tsaharaim are used and are acceptable in daily language. The academy supports "tsohoraim" though.


You are correct about 'mitkasheret', we will fix it.


Yours,

Roi

Team Hebrewpod101.com

Jeannet Benschop
Sunday at 04:41 AM
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I have learned ' tsohoraim' for lunch, but in this lesson it says ' tsaharaim'. Which is the better one? Thanks!

Jeannet Benschop
Sunday at 04:37 AM
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1st sentence of dialogue: isha mirkasheret le`mis-ada.

'mirkasheret' should be 'mitkasheret'

Shalom!

Shelley
Monday at 09:15 AM
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Thank you, Roi, 1. Oops-didn't see I already added "alot" when I reread. 2. Understand 3. If phrase is not a smichut then each word needs a "Hay" for "the". Got it. Thanks again.