Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Jenny: Hi everyone, I’m Jenny.
Lenny: And I’m Lenny!
Jenny: And welcome to Culture Class: Essential Hebrew Vocabulary, Lesson 14! In this lesson you'll learn five essential words related to geography and nature. These are five common geographical features in Hebrew. Hand picked. You can find a complete list of vocabulary at HebrewPod101.com

Lesson focus

Jenny: Lenny, what’s our first word?
Lenny: הר
Jenny: mountain
Lenny: (slow) הר (regular) הר
Jenny: Listeners, please repeat:
Lenny: הר
[pause - 5 sec.]
Jenny: In Israel, there are mountains in both the northern and in the southern parts of the country. In the winter, some snow accumulates on Mount Hermon, and lots of Israelis travel there to have fun and ski.
Jenny: Now let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Lenny: (normal) הר חרמון הינו ההר הגבוה ביותר בישראל.
Jenny: Mount Hermon is the highest mountain in Israel.
Lenny: (slow) הר חרמון הינו ההר הגבוה ביותר בישראל.
Jenny: Okay, what’s the next word?
Lenny: ים
Jenny: Sea
Lenny: (slow) ים (regular) ים
Jenny: Listeners, please repeat:
Lenny: ים
[pause - 5 sec.]
Jenny: Israel is located on the Mediterranean Sea, which is between the continents of Asia, Africa and Europe. The Mediterranean is a popular tourist destination.
Jenny: Now let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Lenny: (normal) אסור ומסוכן להכנס לים אם אין מציל.
Jenny: It is forbidden and dangerous to enter the sea if there is no lifeguard.
Lenny: (slow) אסור ומסוכן להכנס לים אם אין מציל.
Jenny: Okay, what’s the next word?
Lenny: מכתש
Jenny: Crater
Lenny: (slow) מכתש (regular) מכתש
Jenny: Listeners, please repeat:
Lenny: מכתש
[pause - 5 sec.]
Jenny: An erosion crater is a geological phenomenon resulting from outlet drift forces, mainly the flow of sediment, on layers of rocks. In Israel, such craters are located in the southern part of the country known as the Negev. These craters are called the Ramon Crater, the large crater and the small crater.
Jenny: Now let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Lenny: (normal) מכתש הינו תופעת טבע ונוף ייחודית.
Jenny: A crater is a unique natural phenomenon and landscape.
Lenny: (slow) מכתש הינו תופעת טבע ונוף ייחודית.
Jenny: Okay, what’s the next word?
Lenny: דיונה
Jenny: Dune
Lenny: (slow) דיונה (regular) דיונה
Jenny: Listeners, please repeat:
Lenny: דיונה
[pause - 5 sec.]
Jenny: A sand dune is a hill formed by erosion when sand is swept by the wind until it accumulates in a large hill. In Israel, sand dunes cover about 1,600 square kilometers, with 1,300 located in the northwestern Negev and the rest in the southern coastal plain.
Jenny: Now let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Lenny: (normal) דיונות גדולות מאוד נמצאות במדבר סהרה.
Jenny: Very large dunes are located in the Sahara Desert.
Lenny: (slow) דיונות גדולות מאוד נמצאות במדבר סהרה.
Jenny: Okay, what’s the last word?
Lenny: נחל
Jenny: stream
Lenny: (slow) נחל (regular) נחל
Jenny: Listeners, please repeat:
Lenny: נחל
[pause - 5 sec.]
Jenny: In Israel, there are many streams, and the biggest and widest one of them is called the great Faran Stream.
Jenny: Now let's hear a sample sentence using this word.
Lenny: (normal) לפעמים לנחל יש מפל מיים.
Jenny: Sometimes a stream has a waterfall.
Lenny: (slow) לפעמים לנחל יש מפל מיים.
QUIZ
Jenny: Okay listeners, are you ready to be quizzed on the words you just learned? Lenny will give you the Hebrew – please say the English meaning out loud! Are you ready?
Lenny: הר
[pause]Jenny: Mountain
Lenny: ים
[pause]Jenny: Sea
Lenny: מכתש
[pause]Jenny: Crater
Lenny: דיונה
[pause]Jenny: Dune
Lenny: נחל
[pause]Jenny: Stream

Outro

Jenny: There you have it – five geographical features commonly found in Israel! We have more vocab lists available at HebrewPod101.com, so please be sure to check them out. Thanks, everyone, see you next time!
Lenny: להתראות

14 Comments

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HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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What is the most interesting geographical feature in Israel for you?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:23 PM
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Hi Tom,

Thanks a lot! I loved American TV shows as a kid, and also today, so I guess that's why ?

"Intermittent"! I'm glad to have learnt a new word.

Geographically, the Paran is in the south of Israel, in the Negev desert, close to the Jordanian border.


The Yarkon in Tel Aviv is usually used for recreation; rowing and a little fishing. it used to be polluted but it has been undergoing a process of purification.


Cheers,

Idit

Tom
Friday at 10:20 PM
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Toda raba, Idit!


By the way, your English is exceptionally good. In watching some of the videos I would not guess you are not American.


We would call the Paran an intermittent stream. I still don't know where it is. On a map I see that Tel Aviv has the Yarkon River - is it used for recreation? Fishing? Swimming? Or is it polluted?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Friday at 07:03 PM
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Hi Tom,

The Paran stream exists, but it is inactive most of the year - except during winter. Much like a dormant volcano is still called a volcano, an inactive stream is still called a stream. In Hebrew we call an inactive stream נַחַל אַכְזָב.

that means a stream that only has water running in it during winter.


hope this helps!


Idit

Team Hebrewpod101.com.

Tom
Friday at 12:48 PM
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If the Faran River does not exist, perhaps another one should be listed?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 09:23 PM
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Hi Shelley,


You said it! learning a new language, especially if it's very different from your native language, is really hard... But you know that already :sweat_smile:


Good luck to us both :wink:


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley
Tuesday at 06:28 AM
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lol-Thank you, Yara-I know where the Arava is or at least what it is. Are you still in Japan learning Japanese? ( your Hebrew.com profile) How is that coming? Not easy learning a language!

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 02:09 AM
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Hi Shelley,


That's a very good question, and as a matter of fact, I don't think this river exists... There is a Faran river (sometimes pronounced Paran, I'm not sure which one is correct) in south Israel, in the Arava.

By the way, I had to look that up, so we both learned something today :smile:


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley
Friday at 06:15 AM
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Wow-so many answers! Thank you thank you. You were very clear and I understand most of it. But where is the great Faron river found? Near what city? I never heard of it before.

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Friday at 03:14 AM
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Hi Shelley,


I'll try to answer everything :smile:

“et” appears only before "ha", so it will never appear before a proper noun (that never gets "ha"). I understand the confusion though because it's slightly different in English ("*the* river Farron" as apposed to נחל פרון). If you would write “where are rivers found?”, you wouldn't need "et" either, because "rivers" will not have "ha" either.

Yes, you did the “it” part right in the second sentence, but you could have just wrote הוא (instead of הינו), that would have made the sentence more natural - הינו is considered rather formal.

The Hebrew translation of the expression "to what - " will not always be the same - it will change according to the meaning. The word "lama" means only "why", but I suppose you meant "le-ma", which is a combination of the preposition ל (to/for) and the question word מה ("what"). This expression can only be used to ask "for what", like in "למה זה משמש" - le-ma ze meshamesh, "what is it used for". You're right, Hebrew is indeed more specific and requires the use of “to which”.

I would say the most natural phrasing of your sentence would be:

?איפה נמצא נחל פרון הגדול? לאיזו עיר הוא קרוב


I hope I answered all your questions :sweat_smile:


Sincerely,

Yaara

Team HebrewPod101.com

Shelley
Saturday at 09:10 PM
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Thank you, Yaara, I debated about the "et", but since it is a specific river I think I needed to put it in. If I wrote "where are rivers found?" then I would not need to include it? So I did the "it" part right in the second sentence, but I could have just left it out of the sentence instead of putting "the form for she" there? In English we can say to what, but it seems that Hebrew is more specific and I need to use to which. "to which" sounds more formal in English. Does "to which" also mean "to what?" is there any use of "lama" in Hebrew?

How would you write the first sentence in Hebrew to make it mean the same way I had it in the English? so many questions and there will be so many answers!