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Lesson Transcript

Jessi: Hello, and welcome to Hebrew Survival Phrases, brought to you by HebrewPod101.com. This course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Israel. You'll be surprised at how far a little Hebrew will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and there you'll find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!
Survival Phrases lesson 16 - Counting
This lesson is very straightforward as we're going to cover counting from zero through ten. Let's jump right in.
Please note that counting things in Hebrew can be a bit tricky as objects in Hebrew have gender.
First we will list the masculine form of the numbers, and then the feminine form.
0 אפס efes
1 אחד/אחת echad/achat
2 שניים/שתיים shnayim/shtayim
3 שלושה/שלוש shlosha/shalosh
4 ארבעה/ארבע arba'ah/arba
5 חמישה/חמש chamisha/chamesh
6 שישה/שש shisha/shesh
7 שבעה/שבע shiv'ah/sheva
8 שמונה/שמונה shmona/shmone
9 תשעה/תשע tish'ah/tesha'
10 עשרה/עשר asara/eser
Neutral numbers (numbers of streets, public transport lines, and numbers as you read them one by one) are set in their feminine form. Furthermore, we also use "one" or Echad/achat as the indefinite article meaning "a/an" after nouns. So we have Echad after masculine nouns, and Achat after feminine nouns. For example, "One person (a man)" is Ish echad. Let’s break down this two words and hear them one more time, Ish echad. And "One person (a woman)" is Isha achat. Let’s break down this two words and hear them one more time, Isha achat.
The number comes first, followed by the thing. To say "two people" you will say, Shnei anashim. In this case, nashim is the plural of Ish. An exception is the singular form. In the singular form, the noun that you count comes first followed by the number. Please note that in Hebrew, as you have seen, nouns have singular and plural forms and they can be feminine, or masculine or neutrer.
If there are "five people," you have Chamisha anashim.
Numbers can be very useful especially when shopping in Israel. Let's imagine you are buying some presents to bring back to your country. For example, imagine you would like to buy two bottles of Arak (Israeli alcohol) in a nice shop. "I would like to buy two bottles of Arak," for a male speaker is Ani rotze liknot shnei bakbukim shel arak bevakasha. Let’s break down this two words and hear them one more time, Ani rotze liknot shnei bakbukim shel arak bevakasha.
Ani rotze are the Hebrew words for "I would like." Next, you have the word Liknot, which means, "to buy." Then you have the number Shnei "two", followed by Bakbukim, which is plural for the object "bottle." Following next is the word Shel, which in English means, "of." Then we have the word Arak meaning "Israeli alcohol" (what that you wanted to buy). Last, is the word Bevakasha, which in English is "please."
For a female speaker, "I would like to buy two bottles of Arak." is Ani rotza liknot shnei bakbukim shel arak bevakasha. Let’s break down this two words and hear them one more time, Ani rotza liknot shnei bakbukim shel arak bevakasha. Ani rotza are the Hebrew words for "I would like." Next is the word Liknot, which means, "to buy." Then you have the number Shnei "two," followed by Bakbukim, which is plural for the object "bottle." Following it is the word Shel, which in English means, "of." Then we have the word Arak meaning "Israeli alcohol" (what that you wanted to buy). Last, is the word Bevakasha, which in English is "please."
What do you say when you want to buy a nice, traditional, necklace? For a male speaker, "I would like to buy a necklace," is Ani rotze liknot sharsheret achat. Ani rotze are the Hebrew words for "I would like." Liknot is the verb "to buy." Let’s break it word down and hear it again, Liknot. Next, we have Sharsheret "necklace." Let’s break this word down and hear it again, Sharsheret. Finally, you have achat used as an indefinite article meaning, "a/an." Let’s use entire sentence now, Ani rotze liknot sharsheret achat.
For a female speaker, "I would like to buy a necklace," is Ani rotza liknot sharsheret achat. Ani rotza are the Hebrew words for "I would like." Liknot is the verb "to buy." Let’s break it down and hear it again, Liknot. Next, we have Sharsheret "necklace." Let’s break it down and hear it one more time, Sharsheret. Finally, you have achat used as an indefinite article meaning, "a/an." Let’s use entire sentence now, Ani rotze liknot sharsheret achat.
In this case, we use Achat after the noun Sharsheret, since Sharsheret ("necklace") is in the singular form.
Eventually, you change your mind, and decide to buy Shaon, meaning a "watch" in English. If you are a male, you would say, Ani rotze liknot shaon echad. "I would like to buy a watch." Let’s break it down and hear it one more time, shaon, Ani rotze liknot shaon echad.
If you are a female, you would say, Ani rotza liknot shaon echad. "I would like to buy a watch." Let’s break it down and hear it one more time, shaon, Ani rotza liknot shaon echad.
Please note that shaon is a masculine noun, so for this reason we have changed the indefinite article Achat to Echad.
Ok, to close out today's lessons, we would like you to practice what you have just learned. I’ll provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you’re responsible for shouting it out loud. You’ll have a few seconds before I give you the answer, so Behatzlacha! which means “Good luck!” in Hebrew.
“One person.”(male counter) - Ish echad.
“One person.”(female counter) - Isha achat.
“Five people.” - Chamisha anashim.
“I would like to buy two bottles of Arak please.”(for a male speaker) - Ani rotze liknot shnei bakbukim shel arak, bevakasha.
“I would like to buy two bottles of Arak please.”(for a female speaker) - Ani rotza liknot shnei bakbukim shel arak, bevakasha.
“I would like to buy a necklace.”(for a male speaker) - Ani rotze liknot sharsheret achat.
“I would like to buy a necklace.”(for a female speaker) - Ani rotza liknot sharsheret achat.
“I would like to buy a watch.”(for a male speaker) - Ani rotze liknot shaon echad.
“I would like to buy a watch.”(for a female speaker) - Ani rotza liknot shaon echad.
Jessi: Alright! That's going to do it for today. Remember to stop by HebrewPod101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment!

26 Comments

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HebrewPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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What is the most difficult number to pronounce?

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 06:12 AM
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Shalom Betsy,


Todah rabah for your feedback! We took a note of it and will take it into consideration! Thank you!


Kind regards,

Levente (לבנטה)

Team HebrewPod101.com

Betsy
Wednesday at 09:01 PM
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Great lesson--thank you!


The practice at the end is especially helpful. However, the teacher goes too fast! I can't even state the words, much less think about what I am about to say. Is it possible to allow a bit more wait time before giving the "answer"?


Thank you!

HebrewPod101.com
Thursday at 04:35 PM
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Hi Louis Boer,


Thanks for commenting.


In Hebrew, R is never "w" and should always sound guttural as you heard it on the second R. Naturally, some people who learned Hebrew later than in their childhood might have an accent that would result in different R sounds, but this doesn't reflect the "correct" pronunciation.

Right, generally speaking, the guttural R is easier to produce after consonants than after vowels.


Yours,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Louis Boer
Tuesday at 09:58 PM
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I hear the first R in the word שרשרת pronounced as "w", shaw-sheret. Production of resh is apparently affected when followed by a sheen. By contrast, the second R in the word שרשרת is pronounced as guttural "r". Production of resh apparently more easy when followed by a tet. Correct?

HebrewPod101.com
Thursday at 03:34 AM
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Hi Cindy Yourison,


Thanks for commenting and for the positive feedback!


Yes, but the identity of the speaker isn't important. Any speaker, speaking to a male, would use 'rotze' when asking "do you want", and 'rotza' when speaking to a female.


Yours,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com


Cindy Yourison
Friday at 12:19 AM
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Thanks for the lesson.

I have a question:

If I am a female speaker, speaking to a male, would I use rotze?

And if I was a male speaker, speaking to a female, would I use rotza?

Thanks. Have a blessed day!

HebrewPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 03:49 AM
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Hi Cornelia,


Thanks for commenting!


Yes, you're correct Shnayim/Shtayim is the name of the number 2, but in Hebrew, the number 2 is inflated when describing nouns, according to the gender. Therefore, 2 girls will: shtey yeladot (and not shtayim) and 2 boys: shney yeladim.

This topic will be covered in future lessons, don't worry if it's not yet 100% understood :)


Yours,

Roi

Team HebrewPod101.com

Cornelia
Saturday at 03:55 AM
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Hi, in the beginning of the lesson you say that "two" is shnayim/shtayim, but in the examples you use "Shnei" for two bottles. Please explain... Thank you

Shelley
Wednesday at 10:22 PM
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There is a confusing typo in the grammar notes-second paragraph after the numbers-nashim should be anashim-Please add missing letter "a". Thanks.

Shelley
Tuesday at 12:14 PM
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Shalom Roi,

This lesson says that ten, Esser, is feminine, but when you get to 11, 12, and the teens, esrai is used for the second half of the feminine numbers which is the male form of ten according to this lesson and the masculine numbers use esser for the second half which is the feminine form of ten. I understand the switch because the single numbers switch and it makes the numbers shorter, but definately mixed up, but correct for Hebrew. Can't seem to remember these numbers without a chart in front of me. Is this correct?